Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

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2
votes
4answers
374 views

Can I say down north as well as down south?

Here are two definitions of the word "down" form TFD.com Down a. Toward or in the south; southward: flew down to Florida. Down b. in a particular part of a country: down south. According to ...
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1answer
24 views

When do we use "redo", "do over" and "start over"?

It seems that British people often say "redo" and American people say "do over" and "start over". There are some questions about these phrases I want to ask. We say "...
2
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1answer
19 views

Can "Rinse off the apple/the apple off" or "Rinse the dirt off" be used as a short form of "Rinse the dirt off the apple"?

According to the dictionary, we can say She rinsed the dirt off the lettuce. He rinsed the soap out of the cup. And we can also say Rinse (off) the apple before you eat it. rinse (out) a cup or ...
0
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1answer
22 views

Would it be wrong to use "feeling" here instead of "doing"?

If you know that the person you're asking about is in a coma, would it be wrong to use "feeling" here instead of "doing"? A: How is Trey? Is he feeling/doing better?" B: Not ...
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4answers
2k views

Can we call "a robber" "a thief"?

According to Collins dictionary, "a thief" generally refers to anyone who steals. What is the difference between thief, robber and burglar? Anyone that steals can be called a thief. A ...
0
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0answers
24 views

What's the difference between 'much of' and 'much'?

I read in a book this sentence: You may wonder how much of a risk there is. From my previous experience, 'much of' means 'a great portion of', but in the above sentence, it seems not. I think it means ...
0
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1answer
20 views

Is it correct to say "I weeded the wheat"?

We often say "to weed + a ground", for example, “I weeded the garden/flower bed…”. Do we say “to weed + a kind of plant”, for example, “I weeded the wheat/flowers…”? This is from Google book ...
2
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2answers
38 views

Is it correct to say "don't let the door loose from the magnet"?

Look at these above pictures! The door in my room is kept from moving freely with a magnet on the wall. It is important to keep it sticking to the magnet all the time because strong winds might slam ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Why can't I say "to regain my mood"?

I was asking whether I could use the phrase in the title in the different site and there was an English native speaker that didn't understand what I was trying to say. So, I suppose the usage of this ...
1
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1answer
23 views

On opening a sentence with the (quasi-)command, "Look..."

It's quite common, especially in spoken English, to hear someone begin an explanation with the word, "Look". For example, on US cable news and the like, we often hear an exchange something ...
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1answer
13 views

the usage of "most" as in "the place that you most like to visit"

the place that you most like to visit the place that you like to visit most the place that you like to visit the most the activity that you most want to do the activity that you want to do most the ...
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0answers
16 views

Would 'sure' be natural in these examples?

I wrote three examples where I used sure. I would like to know if I have used it as I intended. 1. I painted it myself. You like it? ...Sure. Would sure be perfect here if he doesn't really like it? ...
0
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1answer
19 views

How do you ask to know whether "reaching" a doctor's service was easily accessible?

I am trying to write down a questionnaire for people (patients) on vacation, who were served by a doctor/nurse on the scene (in this example, at the hotel). I would like to ask whether the service ...
0
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2answers
40 views

What is the difference between "My sole is tickling" and "My sole is ticklish"?

According to my research, "My sole is tickling" refers to "uncomfortable feeling" or a very little pain like an ant bites you or so, while "My sole is ticklish" refers to ...
0
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1answer
51 views

Is it rude to say: "Let us make sure this does not happen again."

I was told that "Let us make sure this does not happen again." is disrespectful. My manager had this line at the end of her email to my team. A few found it disrespectful. Is that so?
1
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1answer
19 views

In what cases can we use "where" to lead a subordinate clause, when not talking about places?

We can use "Where" to lead subordinate clauses when talking about places. A place where people live Sometimes "where" can also be used for more abstract concepts. I missed the ...
2
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0answers
43 views

Is it correct to say "don't go Err like that before talking"?

One problem of my daughter is that she often says "Err Err Err" for a while (3 or 4 seconds) before saying a full sentence. Probably, she makes that sounds because she can't remember the ...
1
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0answers
20 views

Why is "for" used in "for me" in standup meetings?

In standup meetings where each attendee tells about what they did yesterday in turn, people always start with "For me", for example, "For me, yesterday I finished my task" or "...
0
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2answers
47 views

What is the name of the packaging of sterile bandages?

Some adhesive bandages come in small sterile wrappers like the one shown on the top of the image below. What word is used to name this type of packaging, either technically or colloquially? (Of course,...
0
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1answer
23 views

"Besides" vs "as well as" in context

Would you tell me why it isn't natural to use besides in the sentence below? Can you give the length of width of the box besides the height? I've asked a couple of native speakers of English and ...
3
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2answers
44 views

Is it correct and natural to ask "what is something count?" when you want to know how many something there is?

Would you tell me if it is correct and natural to ask what is something count? when you want to know how many something there is. For example: What's the pallet count and what are their sizes? By ...
0
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1answer
14 views

Can I add “both”?

I heard the person who is a doctor and a professor is called “doctor and professor” or “doctor/professor” as a title. Can I add “both” to it? (both doctor and professor)
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1answer
22 views

Tidal current is setting in the direction of Northeast

I use marine English at work. Which one is correct? Tidal current is setting to the direction of Northeast. Tidal current is setting in the direction of Northeast.
0
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1answer
29 views

Plural of “reason”

Reason: the cause of an event or situation or something that provides an excuse or explanation (From the Cambridge) A doesn’t provide an excuse or explanation for C. B doesn’t provide an excuse or ...
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3answers
42 views

"Namely", "I.e." and "That is (to say)"

According to the dictionary definitions, all these three items mean identical to me: a. namely b. i.e. c. that is (to say) They are used when one needs to give more details about something that ...
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1answer
17 views

the usage and meaning of the "red line" [closed]

I think the expression of the "red line" means "definitely critical factor or necessary stuff to achieve or make something". Am I correct? Please, give your valuable comment. Thank ...
0
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0answers
26 views

Is it correct and natural to ask "do you have length and width" when you want to know if the person knows the dimensions of something?

Would you tell me if it is correct and natural to ask do you have length and width when you want to know if the person knows the dimensions of something? For example: You said the fridge's height is ...
3
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1answer
44 views

Can 'ready' play a role of a 'predicate continuation'?

https://www.lexico.com/definition/unmade (of a bed) not having the bedclothes arranged tidily ready for sleeping in. I'm a little confused about the usage of the word 'ready' here. Does it just mean ...
1
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1answer
38 views

Is it more common to use the word "figuratively" or "metaphor" to require listeners to understand the meaning in a figurative way?

This matter bogged me down for quite a while. That is, I don't understand why the word "literally" is used a lot while "figuratively" is not common in everyday English. In stead of ...
1
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2answers
41 views

Bacherlor's in Mathematics or Bachelor of Mathematics?

What's the correct name of the degree? Bacherlor's in Mathematics or Bachelor of Mathematics? Addendum: If a document says: The University... grants the degree of: ... Which one would be correct?
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0answers
30 views

Usage of the word inside and within

Is there any difference between the usage of the word inside and within in the context of the following sentence: (i) the accused stood inside the gate to his house (ii) the accused stood within the ...
0
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1answer
22 views

When used in a title, will "Development and present practice" be understood to mean past (historical) development or just the recent?

My thesis deals with treatment of melanoma and it should explain the development and progress of various methods as well as the current practice. I spent a lot of time on trying to figure out a proper ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Is there any difference between "She lives on a far-flung land" and "She lives on a far-off land"?

The Oxford dictionary says far-off adjective /ˈfɑːr ɒf/ /ˈfɑːr ɔːf/ [only before noun] ​a long distance away far-flung adjective /ˌfɑː ˈflʌŋ/ /ˌfɑːr ˈflʌŋ/ [usually before noun] (literary) ​a ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Are "She is being rude" and "She is behaving rudely" roughly the same?

We know that "to be" verb is not normally used in any continuous tenses except when it means "to behave" To be : 6 [linking verb] to behave in a particular way He was just being ...
0
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1answer
22 views

Is it correct to say "don't pull out these bits of wool/cotton"?

My sweater is made of wool or cotton and there are some bits of wool or cotton sticking up on the sweater. What are these bits called? My children often try to pull these bits out, which may ruin my ...
8
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6answers
3k views

Is "I will do yoga for good" ambiguous because of the phrase "for good"?

"For Good" here is a noun and means 1-[noncount] : for morally good forces or influences Teachers can be a strong force for good. But, it also means 2-forever She's gone for good When I ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Use of "slush" in a sentence

Children are playing football during rain. A child falls on the wet mud as described In the following sentence The boy came slushing down on the ground. Is it common/idiomatic to use slush as a verb ...
0
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0answers
16 views

"I am delighted by or with the food" or "the food delighted me"

Can I say? "I am delighted by or with the food" or "the food delighted me" I wonder if it is correct and usual to say "I am delighted by or with the food" or " the ...
3
votes
1answer
164 views

What is the difference between "a track" and "a trail" as in "Follow the track/trail to the temple on the top of the mountain"?

It seems that more people say "Follow the trail to the temple on the top of the mountain" than "Follow the track to the temple on the top of the mountain"? Is there any difference ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Can I use "pique" (verb) to mean I am stimulated by something?

Does this sound natural? "This book has piqued me. Now, I love reading." If that doesn't work, why? What's the reason? Could you suggest another verb that works? The definition I got from ...
0
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0answers
10 views

Can I say "kudos" as an exclamation?

I've looked up in OALD that this word is a noun. The common expression of its usage according to the dictionary is Kudos to somebody for something. Can I use this word as an exclamation just like ...
3
votes
2answers
440 views

Can we say "I am having a Covid shot tomorrow"?

The verb "have" has many meanings. Some of its meanings can be used in continuous tenses, its other tenses can not be used in continuous tenses. For example, "I am having a great time&...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Is it correct to say "don't have random food and drink sold in the street"?

"random" ("not known or not identified") often refers to a person Some random guy gave me a hundred bucks. You don’t want some random dude telling you how to live your life. Can &...
0
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1answer
16 views

How to use "conclude" in a phrase?

Can "conclude" be used in the following way: a) conclude by the fact that... --> e.g. He is smart. This, one can conclude by the fact that he solved the tasks easily. b)from x one can ...
0
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1answer
11 views

Does "any" change to "some" in reported speech?

This sentence appeared in a reported speech exercise assigned to me. "Are there any oranges in the fridge?", she asked her mom. This is the exercise's key — it changed "any" to &...
3
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2answers
107 views

Are "I am not standing for your nonsense any longer" and "I am not standing your nonsense any longer" the same?

From the Merriam-Webster Learner's Dictionary: stand for (something) 3 : to allow (something) to continue to happen — usually used in negative statements I will not stand for [=put up with] any more ...
0
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2answers
37 views

false versus wrong

"I like very much coffee." This sentence is wrong. This sentence is false. Is it correct if I use either "wrong" or "false"? The meanings of them in Cambridge ...
5
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2answers
537 views

He taught me how to swim/ride

Is "how" optional in such sentences? "He taught me how to ride a bicycle/how to swim."
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0answers
31 views

On their side idiomatic

Is "on their side" idiomatic? Or do you use a similar expression or an idiom? "If my friends needed me I was always on their side."
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0answers
35 views

Human brain or brains

Should I use the singular or the plural form of brain? Would a native speaker say "human's brain" in my sentence? "She studies parasites and how some of them affect human brain."

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