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Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

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Does "reservation" really mean who made the reservation must check in a hotel? [closed]

I am applying tourist visas for my parents and I have make a reservation in a hotel in the UK already. I do not travel to the UK so only my parents are checking in instead. However the reservation ...
otakutyrant's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
18 views

Difference between "sight" and "scene" in the sense of "what you see/can see"

I have these 2 sentences: Roadside stalls are a common sight in the city. I stared out of the window of the train on the ever-changing scene. In both sentences, I think "sight" and "...
Phoebe's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
37 views

What is the difference an entryway, entry, entrance hall, vestibule, foyer and mudroom?

All six terms refer to areas which are directly behind the door of a home and lead to other rooms. What's the difference? Also, are entries and entryways rooms or not?
Idk29's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
23 views

What is the difference between a voucher and a gift certificate?

Is my assumption about the difference correct?:A voucher features a specific service or product that you can get for free at a specific place whereas a gift certificate features a specific monetary ...
Idk29's user avatar
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-1 votes
0 answers
29 views

Meaning of a sentence in the first hunger games book

What's the meaning of "shutters on the squat grey houses are closed"
Luna Chracha's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
39 views

Is "emblem" used with something trivial?

I always think of an "emblem" as something traditional and representing a nation and the like. So, I'm wondering if, for example, the following sentence is correct: The car is an emblem of ...
an IELTS learner's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
48 views

Can we usually use the word still in a negative sentence?

I happened to see a blog of a Japanese English teacher in a cram school and sentences below are on the blog as usages of a word still. She is still not here. She is not still here. . In this blog he ...
yatterman's user avatar
8 votes
6 answers
3k views

Can I say "Rolex watches are astronomical", "astronomical" in the sense of "expensive"?

I looked up the word "astronomical" in the dictionary and it has an example of "an astronomical price." So I'm wondering if " is astronomical" is a good alternative to &...
Phoebe's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
27 views

Is "think on your feet" used with positive or negative meanings?

I checked 2 chatbots and one says "think on your feet" is used in positive sentences and the other says it is used in negative ones. The dictionary just says "think on your feet: to ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Usage of "still" and "not yet." Are those two the same in meaning?

I am still getting used to the new system you have introduced. I am not yet used to the new system you have introduced. Do those sentences have the same meaning?
yatterman's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

Is it correct to say "I was taking a photo of my son when my daughter got in the camera's view"?

If I am watching TV and someone standing in front of me, I say "You are blocking my view of the TV". Now I am taking a photo or a video and someone jumps into the area in front of the camera....
Tom's user avatar
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-2 votes
0 answers
35 views

Please let me know which sentence I should use between ‘You are my everyday.’ and ‘You are my every day.’?

I have been translating song lyrics from Korean to English. However, I am unsure of use which sentence.
뽀뽀_kissmehard's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
503 views

Is "They have gotten the vaccine" grammatically correct?

I know it's grammatically correct to say "They have received the vaccine", but I am not sure if it's also correct to say "They have gotten the vaccine". "Have gotten" ...
Maurice's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
14 views

Is it okay to use "does it" instead of "could it" depending on the context?

I sometimes come across questions in conversations where the word "does" is used in a situation where "could" would normally be used. For example if someone asks the following ...
Steve Pemberton's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

What does 'walk out' mean in 'You go out for a walk out in a green space which helps with fitness'?

You go out for a walk out in a green space which helps with fitness – that also helps to improve your mental health, reduces loneliness, improves sleep, and can also help to reduce one’s blood ...
Mr. Wang's user avatar
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7 votes
4 answers
2k views

Do native speakers say "I'm [keen on/fond of] cloudy days"?

I'm learning some different ways to say "I like", and to my mind right now, keen on, fond of, and like are pretty much the same. However, since I almost never said keen on and fond of before,...
an IELTS learner's user avatar
5 votes
6 answers
3k views

Is this a school badge?

Is this called a school badge? According to Oxford Dictionary badge: (British English) (North American English patch) a piece of material that you sew onto clothes as part of a uniform the school ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
5 answers
99 views

Is it natural to say "you don't want me to lose face, do you?" in this situation?

My daughter didn't want to wash her hair. If she went to school with dirty hair, her teachers would notice that and judge (quietly in their head) my wife and me to be lazy parents. To convince my ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
27 views

care of or care for

Which one of the below is correct? The involvement of fathers in the care for their newborn baby is beneficial. or The involvement of fathers in the care of their newborn baby is beneficial. Most ...
tina's user avatar
  • 51
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

If we can say "roomy jackets", can we say "a roomy shirt"?

collinsdictionary.com: If you describe a piece of clothing as roomy, you mean that you like it because it is large and fits loosely: roomy jackets On hinative.com two American English speakers said &...
Loviii's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
55 views

Is it correct to say "the hem came unsewn"?

(source) The thread of my hem of my Tshirt got broken and a short part of the hem is unsewn. Is it correct to say:? the hem came undone the hem came unsewn the hem is falling apart.
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
4 answers
57 views

What does "a cat is crawling" mean?

"Crawl" has 2 meanings: 1-to move along on your hands and knees with your body close to the ground The baby crawled across the floor. 2- if an insect crawls, it moves using its legs There’s ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
30 views

How to express merging two texts with common phrases?

We have two texts in a way that each has some unique phrases and some duplicate phrases within it. I want to ask someone to merge the two texts, keep the unique phrases of both ones and merge the ...
Amirreza's user avatar
  • 167
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

Am I correct in this sentence "My interests span different genres"?

My interests span different genres What I'm trying to say is that I have a lot of interests, but I'm not sure if I use the verb "span" correctly since I read a lot of example sentences and ...
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 171
3 votes
2 answers
506 views

I am happy I could/was able to help you. - which one?

Example 1 I am happy I could help you. I remember "could" is used to talk about general ability in the past. So, why is it being used here? Is it because it is in a subordinate clause? I ...
vincentlin's user avatar
  • 2,325
1 vote
1 answer
28 views

Merely vs only in data reports

Only 12% and 17% of users played games and music on their phones in 2006, respectively. Can I use merely in place of only in the above sentence? I haven't found any examples of merely preceding data ...
an IELTS learner's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
2k views

How to use DOUBLE as a verb

Context: There are 90 boys and 40 girls in a school. Is it correct to say The number of boys more than doubles that of girls. Or The number of boys is more than double that of girls. How to use ...
tina's user avatar
  • 51
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

Role of "that" in "Where are some places in your neighborhood that people like to hang out?"

Where are some places in your neighborhood that people like to hang out? I think "that" introduces the subordinating adverb clause in the sentence above, and can be replaced with "where&...
Qiang Lu's user avatar
  • 111
2 votes
3 answers
63 views

Do native speakers say "the highest height", "the longest length", or "the deepest depth", etc?

Do native speakers say "the highest height", "the longest length", or "the deepest depth", etc? I find these expressions repetitive, but I don't know how else to express ...
Ken Adams's user avatar
  • 1,053
-1 votes
1 answer
41 views

Do you say "he makes money selling saliva" to mean he makes money out of his talking skills?

Sometimes, "to sell saliva" (literally translated) to mean to make money by just using his/her talking skills, normally with a negative meaning. It often used to refer to middlemen. Say you ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 23.8k
1 vote
1 answer
29 views

The meaning of "I don’t want to look, but let’s see"

A quote from a book Phillips awoke from anesthesia the next morning in a hospital. He recalls, “I did the proverbial ‘I don’t want to look, but let’s see’ ” and checked under his blanket to find “an ...
leminh81's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Can we use "define sth as clause..." AS "define sth as sth"?

From StoneyB on hiatus 's answer in What is the meaning of "as with" in the following sentences? The first example, defining snap as it is used in utterances like “Her eyes snapped with ...
Mr. Wang's user avatar
  • 988
1 vote
2 answers
37 views

The ring was put on in/at the wedding. - which is acceptable?

We use "in" when the subject is actively taking part in an event. For example, "The bride put on the ring in the wedding." And when the subject is just a viewer or audience, we ...
vincentlin's user avatar
  • 2,325
-1 votes
2 answers
60 views

1) Can "solid" mean "considerable/substantial"?— "solid money/success/age"— 2) Can "solid" mean "imposing/important-looking"?— "solid appearance/man" [closed]

I looked up the word "solid" but I still have some questions about it. (all sentences below are mine) Can the word "solid" be used in the meaning of "considerable, ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,669
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Is it correct to say "the figure proliferated from A to B"?

I wrote: The figures for both men and women at the age of 75 proliferated from 34 thousand and 47 thousand in 1911 to 181 thousand and 210 thousand, respectively, after the period. Grammarly ...
Ken Adams's user avatar
  • 1,053
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

Can I use "Britons" in data reports?

Maybe it's just me, but I mostly see people using "British people" or "the British" instead of "Britons". Therefore, I wonder if Britons is used in data reports. For ...
an IELTS learner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

To be logged at an amount

To my mind, log something = record something officially. For example, I might write: The company has logged more than 90 complaints. But what about in passive voice? Is it correct to say: Data on ...
an IELTS learner's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
83 views

Does it make sense to say to a person "you're good to go" when he is done with something?

In the dictionary be good to go ​(of a thing) to be prepared and ready for use; (of a person) to be prepared and ready to do something By tomorrow afternoon the document will be good to go. I’ve ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 23.8k
-1 votes
1 answer
39 views

is there a difference between "circle up" and "circle around"?

Does "Circle up" suggest forming a circle with everyone facing inward, while "circle around" implies forming a circle with everyone facing outward. I got it from a chatbot. Is that ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 23.8k
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Is there another way to say instead of saying "make me"?

I watched a film and in the film, a man forced a woman to leave his office but the woman refused to do that. Then he threatened the woman more but she said "make me". I did a study. It seems ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 23.8k
0 votes
2 answers
29 views

what does "recess" or "break" mean when it is uncountable and when it is countable?

recess / break (uncountable) when it is a resting period between lessons but recess / break (countable) when it is a short period of time when you stop what you are doing and rest, eat, etc. For ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
70 views

Software on/under/in a computer

In a technical documentation, I came across the title "How to run this software under Mac M1 or M2". This made me wonder, again, about a flaw in translation. We often say: "The software ...
Sven Puschmann's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Which is proper for 'The exam is very difficult so I don't think __ can pass it'?

The exam is very difficult so I don't think __ can pass it. A. anybody B. everybody C. no one D. somebody Semantically, I infer the author wanted to emphasize that no one can pass the exam, because ...
Mr. Wang's user avatar
  • 988
1 vote
3 answers
112 views

"He was my father?" vs. "He is my father?"

I've been thinking about this for a long time now, and still haven't been able to come up with a logical explanation. Which is more correct, [1] "He was my father." Or "He is my father?&...
KingofSpades's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
282 views

Is it possible to use the verb "fill" with the word "shortage"?

Can we use the verb "fill" to mean "compensate" when we are talking about shortage of something? For example, can we say "We can fill each other's shortages"?
Shahram's user avatar
  • 65
1 vote
1 answer
34 views

How to express a door opens / closes at different ranges?

Look at the above picture, If the space is A, we say "open the door a crack", can we say "close the door a crack" in this position? If the space is B, we say "open the door a ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 23.8k
1 vote
1 answer
41 views

The shares of Germans and Canadians aged over 65

In the below sentence, I'm trying to use "share" in the sense of "percentage". Can I use it this way? This is a follow-up question to an old post of mine, which hasn't received a ...
an IELTS learner's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
41 views

What adjective describes a boastful, lying man?

A boastful person is one who talks too proudly about himself and his abilities, achievements or possessions. But what about those who lie or exaggerate about themselves? For example, I say, 'I am an ...
mohamadi_arch's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Do you distinguish "show up" and "turn up"?

Some dictionaries say "show up" and "turn up" are synonym, but according to my study: show up: is used to mean to arrive when people are waiting for you expectedly. Seth showed up,...
Tom's user avatar
  • 23.8k
2 votes
2 answers
777 views

What does cavalier mean in this sentence?

In He treated her in a cavalier manner. which does cavalier mean: awkwardly as a brother would polite/politely without care cavalier is defined as 1 : marked by or given to offhand and often ...
Tim's user avatar
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