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Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

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1answer
35 views

This 'that' is a relative pronoun or a pronoun?

I want to know if 'that' of 'that identified with ~' is a relative pronoun or a pronoun in the next sentence. And the exact meaning of 'identify with', too. ....The problem was that the part involved ...
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1answer
14 views

Commercials are on TV,or on the channel

Can I use: Commercials are on the TV right now Commercials are on Channel XYZ. Does "on" sound natural?
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1answer
20 views

“forwards/backwards” vs “forward/backward” vs “rightward” and “leftward”

Is there a difference between The car moves forward The car moves forwards as well as between The car moves backward The car moves backwards and can the same pattern be used for ...
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1answer
14 views

“in-between” vs “in between” vs “inbetween” vs “between”

When to use "between" and when to add an in and say "in between" has become clear from the two very related SE posts: "In between" or "between"? and 'in between' or '...
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0answers
6 views

what's the difference between preaching and proclamation

I checked the meaning of preaching the delivery of a sermon or religious address to an assembled group of people, typically in church. and the meaning of proclamation a public or official ...
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3answers
29 views

The word “rather”

Is it true that the word "rather" is always/usually used with negative emotional sense? That is to say, "rather good" would be wrong, wouldn't it? And I should instead use "quite good", should I?
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3answers
22 views

Is this a correct usage of « «made up of »?

Can we say: New York City is made up of five boroughs? Thks
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3answers
938 views

The show is on a break

A show my mother is watching goes on a break (my mom was not there at that time). So I turned to another channel. So my mom asks me why had I changed the channel. So I say: The show is on a ...
0
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1answer
28 views

markable --> …was markably exhausting to her?

Officially, the adverb 'markably' derived from 'markable' appears not to exist. At least all classical dictionaries (OED, OALD, CALD, LALD, etc. even WordNet v3.1) have no entry. Theoretically, ...
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2answers
62 views

Could you explain the Instrumental case for words used with 'to justify'

Could you explain the Instrumental case to say such pfrases like that - Do not justify your laziness that you are smart. or from your sorce - Intelligent idlers justify their idleness to ...
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2answers
27 views

How many Colors are in/are there in something

A lady asks her 3 yr old daughter: How many colours are in/are there in this toy? What should be used :are in/are there in? Should 'there' be used ?
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0answers
14 views

Full Syllabus/Complete Syllabus test [closed]

"Full/Complete Syllabus" is the syllabus that has been taught through the year. So we have our exams coming up. So what should be used: I have my full/Complete Syllabus test.
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1answer
37 views

When I say I smell gas, do you think of gasoline, or natural gas?

I have a problem with using word "gas". In my language we have two completely different words for gas that is put in car and gas that is used in stove when cooking something. Should I use phrase "...
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2answers
50 views

The use of me and I do?

When responding to "Who sees the hammer?" When the person who sees the hammer answers the questions. Should they use "me" or "I do"?
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10answers
13k views

Ways to say 'get smaller', 'decrease in size' in one word

What are the proper ways to say that something gets smaller (decreases in size) in one word? I am not asking about cases when what we discribe represents a measure of something (price, volume, ...
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2answers
39 views

Can I replace “If so” with “that being said”?

Do you like eating? If so, how about cooking? Can I replace it with this: Do you like eating? That being said, how about cooking? I don't expect to be, but if so, I'll let you know. Can I replace ...
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1answer
10 views

Is it the same to say 'with neither' or 'without both' in context?

Is it the same to say 'with neither' or 'without both' or 'with miss' in this context? What part of speech is 'neither' here? He had, in short, all the Byronic ennui with neither of the Byronic ...
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1answer
20 views

What is the proper meaning of travesty?

Merriam Webster dictionaries define travesty as: a debased, distorted, or grossly inferior imitation. And among the examples of travesty, was a sentence which was: It is a travesty and a tragedy that ...
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3answers
266 views

Why “that of” in these sentences?

“I have anxiously awaited the arrival of those such as yourselves. My names Megumin! My calling is that of an arch wizard, one who controls explosion magic, the strongest of all offensive magic! Do ...
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2answers
21 views

The word “pour” in this context

Pour the oil into the bottle. Pour over the oil into the bottle. As I am not a native speaker, using the word "pour" is difficult to me. Are these two sentences correct, or should I use something ...
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1answer
63 views

Can “bed wetting” be said: 'pee your bed' or 'pee in your bed'

Kids wet their beds. So can't it be: He peed his bed. Or He peed in his bed. What sounds right:#1 or #2? It occurred to me because it's said 'he peed his pants.'
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1answer
24 views

Ambiguity with term “Nationality” [duplicate]

I do not really understand what nationality is. The table is from https://keydifferences.com/difference-between-nationality-and-citizenship.html If nationality represents a place of birth of an ...
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3answers
56 views

Can I replace “man” with another word in words like swordman, manpower, policeman, etc?

Do you know what are elves and dwarfs? They are fictional species for fantasy stories. I was wondering if words like swordman, manpower, policeman, spearman, etc (everything with man) could be ...
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5answers
1k views

What does strut mean?

What does strut mean? Where I can apply the word? I need to know what you call the things in the picture and what strut means. Are those struts in the picture?
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1answer
20 views

Collocation: do + character

This is the character I did last week. Would it be correct for an artist to use "did" in the sentence above? She is talking about the (game) character as an assignment she finished last week. ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

When to use “the lunch” (with the definite article “the”)?

In most sentences that use the word lunch, I found this word does rarely take the definite article the. For example: I have lunch in three hours. Shall we go out for lunch? Let's have ...
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1answer
49 views

Can “of the North” refer to the direction it's coming from and not the point of origin?

Our ship is near the equator, and the wind of the North kept blowing the ship to the south. I feel that "of the North" means that the wind comes from a far away northern region, and not like 2 ...
0
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1answer
29 views

Does the word “self-study” exist as a noun?

When I sit down and dive into a topic on my own, outside of a course or educational environment, with books and online resources that I find, then I have a noun for that in my native language: Et ...
0
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1answer
29 views

Help + in + v-ing or Help + on + v-ing?

Help + in + v-ing or Help + on + v-ing? Example: I used to help my friends in coding C++ or I used to help my friends on coding C++
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1answer
42 views

Have your birthday in December,Birthday in December

Someone was conducting a survey on people who have December Birthdays. So he said: 1.What does it feel like to have you birthday in December? 2.What does it feel like to have a December birthday? 3....
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votes
1answer
23 views

pulsating --> pulsatingly pumping - alternatives?

Officially, the adverb 'pulsatingly' derived from 'pulsating' appears not to exist. At least all classical dictionaries (OED, OALD, CALD, LALD, etc. even WordNet v3.1) have no entry. Theoretically, ...
3
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2answers
45 views

We're a mile ahead of the restaurant already

My mom wants to stop at a restaurant. But we had already passed it. So my dad says: We're already a mile ahead of the restaurant. Is the use of "ahead of the restaurant" natural?
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2answers
24 views

Is there a phrase like: “The next chapter takes over where the previous chapter ended”?

I am trying to correctly write the following sentence: Each chapter takes over where the previous chapter ended. It sounds slightly messy and unnecessarily long and I suspect it to not be properly ...
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3answers
23 views

You eliminated me(game) ,out

We were playing. So a girl got eliminated.(out). What's a more natural to say that? Why did you out me? I mean doesn't "eliminate" sounds a bit formal. I know "out me" sounds unnatural. What would ...
0
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1answer
17 views

so as to + make(s)

I found this sentence in an IELTS book and am questioning whether it is correct: "It would be a good idea to ban cars from city centres on Sundays, so as to makes cities quieter and cleaner for ...
1
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1answer
34 views

Using correct words

Can students call their teacher madam? Example: In a conversation between a teacher and a student. Student: May I open the window, madam? Teacher: It doesn't matter. Do people in UK or USA use ...
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2answers
27 views

Use of “descendant”

Can I use "descendant" instead of "child" in sentence like this: As parents achieved something special to get their status, everyone also expects extraordinary things from a descendant.
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1answer
31 views

Acquit or remit? [closed]

According to Oxford dictionaries' definitions acquit(free (someone) from a criminal charge by a verdict of not guilty) and remit(cancel or refrain from exacting or inflicting (a debt or punishment)) ...
0
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2answers
19 views

'pursue' and 'pursue out of'

As I understand a verb 'pursue' has different meanings here. Am I right or maybe there is one meaming for 'persue' and 'pursue' with 'out of'? Cromlechs and menhirs, flint implements and neolithic ...
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1answer
26 views

Motivation vs. Purpose

I felt there's a similarity in meaning and words could be used interchangeably when I tried to use the words in sentence, for example: My motivation to attend the course / meeting / study .. My ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Pull up a few photos(Shawn Mendes)

What does "pull up a few"want her? I looked it up and it was about "getting information" ,so is that what Shawn meant here: So can it be: You want information related to this,so just pull it up. (...
0
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1answer
48 views

“really not” vs “not really”

If someone says "David is not really a leader", it means something like: the speaker believes that David isn't the kind of person you would think of as a without-doubt a real leader; but the speaker ...
0
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1answer
29 views

What is the difference between “thief” and “burglar”? [closed]

Is there any difference between "thief" and "burglar" in meaning?
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3answers
32 views

“Splash me” vs. “splash water on my face”

What is it: 1. Hey! Stop splashing me! (in a pool) 2. Hey! Stop splashing water on me! In a washroom: 3. I splashed my face with cold water. 4. I splashed cold water on my face. What is with the ...
0
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1answer
10 views

Slumming it in a pit meaning

What does " not slumming it in a pit" mean here(of course if I heard it right.) https://youtu.be/J5nYK7GgYDc It's somewhere around 1:10.
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2answers
38 views

Spill/splash/throw/pour water

A girl was feeling sleepy(as she'd just woken up.)She's talking to her friend. So her friend asks her to pick up a glass of water,and : Throw it on your face. Splash it on your face./Splash your face....
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1answer
20 views

The meaning of either in following sentence [closed]

The Queen was enjoying being queen and what better way to remain so than to merry the prince herself. The prince however did not like the idea either
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1answer
24 views

Throw/toss something in the air

So what should be used: Throw the ball up in the air. Toss the ball in the air. What should be used: throw up/toss?And should "in or into the air" be used ?
0
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1answer
30 views

Is “may possibly” grammatically correct?

I would like to know if it is grammatically correct to use may possibly to express possibility, such as in the following sentence: Middle income countries may possibly experience a significant ...
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1answer
12 views

Which phrase should I use in connection with accreditation?

What is the difference between accredited status vs. accreditation status? What is the difference between test laboratory vs. testing laboratory? Are they both correct? Context: The accredited/...