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Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

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Can I say "let's eat. Hurry up!" to just one person while I am not eating or about to eat?

I know "let's" is short for "let us". For example, Let's break for lunch. = Let us break for lunch. But Oxford dictionary says "let’s [no passive] used for making suggestions ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 answer
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Another view of since

I searched and found this explanation, "It's five years since I had my accident. ( the present perfect is not acceptable here ) because the idea can be interpreted as : I had the accident five ...
Thamilay's user avatar
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23 votes
6 answers
6k views

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

People say "to be low on fuel" to mean not having enough fuel. Can I say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"? Some say the opposite of &...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
70 views

What is the difference between a final draft and a final version?

Am I right that: Since a draft is a rough version, then a final draft is a final rough version. That means a final draft implies you will submit it to someone and he may not approve it and ask to work ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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Usage of since with simple present

As per my learning, I kept in mind that since can be used only perfect tenses because since defined by started in the past and continues to the present.However when I saw "how long is it since ...
Thamilay's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
24 views

Usage of In ,for and within

I want to understand clearly. I saw my friend two years ago and I still remember that he was short. But, right now he has become tall. Within two years, he has grown taller. I want to express that ...
Thamilay's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
73 views

How to refer to the last of more than two elements in a list without reiterating the names?

In this example sentence, would "latter" be correct? This writing focuses on Pissarro, Courbet, and Monet but we will direct our attention to the latter. If not, what other phrasing could ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Present participle and past participle

I want to understand that to identify the situations by using present participle and past participle. 1.We have to save increased income for health. 2.We have to save increasing income for health. #1 ...
Thamilay's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
33 views

Is there another more natural way to say "do it with excitement"?

I asked my daughter to dance but she seemed to dance in a way that lacks enthusiasm. Can I say to her "do it with excitement" in this situation? Or do we have other more natural expressions?
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
167 views

What is an undemanding person?

A dictionary says "If you describe someone as undemanding, you mean they are easy to be with and do not ask other people to do a great deal for them." Can we use the term "an ...
Tom's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
186 views

The expression "that's no way to do something"

I recently heard this expression from a podcast episode, where a guest said "that's no way to treat a woman". from the context of that conversation, I infer that this likely means "that'...
oeter's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
39 views

"You have maximum time" meaning

You have maximum time. I'd like to use this sentence in song lyrics to convey the meaning that you have a significant amount of time and opportunity. Does it sound natural and easily understood?
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
28 views

How to use "income distribution" and "age distribution" [closed]

I have problem using prepositions with "distribution". Are all these options correct? Are "income distribution" and "age distribution" both countable? Maybe in the first ...
newbie forever's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
96 views

I exactly want to know what 'now' means [closed]

As I know, 'now' has two meanings. one is 'from now on' and the other is 'at this point'. I don't have time to watch TV now. Ming is worried now. Do both 'now' mean 'from now on' because those ...
jung won kim's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
74 views

Is this called a block gate?

Look at this above picture, a complex of several tall buildings has a gate. Vehicles go in and out through that gate and there is some security guards standing on watch there to make sure only ...
Tom's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
50 views

Present perfect tence witth "for"

I have received a letter every month for ten years. It is correct? Because I can't understand that it wants to mean 1.I have received a letter in the last ten years. Or 2.It has been ten years since I ...
Thamilay's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
51 views

Pronounciation and casing

Me and my wife have young kids (one of which is 5) who are currently being taught English at school, we live in the UK. She is under the belief that kids in the UK are taught in infant school that a ...
Tinker Coder's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
72 views

Can we call England "a member nation" of the UK?

Overall, these data support the hypothesis that the UK will see an older population after half a century, which is the result of increases in the proportion of elderly people in each member nation. I ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

Is "bingo" a common phrase in everyday conversation?

Is "bingo" a common phrase in everyday conversation ? Google gemini and ChatGPT give me different answers. Gemini says no. ChatGPT says yes
Qiulang 邱朗's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

What are the dirty things that come out when you erase a mark called?

You use a sharpener to sharpen a pencil and you have wood shavings. Now, you use an eraser to erase a mark on a paper and you have some dirty bits. What are these bits called? Are they called dirt? ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
67 views

Is it too strong to say "the soup will wash off/ away the lipstick"?

People often use "wash something away/off" with strong water force. For example, The flood washed away the bridge Wash the mud off the bikes before you put them away. A woman is wearing ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
42 views

This is our first /the first test this term

This is our first test this term. This is our the first test this term. Which one is right?Shouldn’t we put the in front of first? And why?
Ella Zhang's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
66 views

What the usage of "have sufficient in common" is?

From [Rodney Huddleston Geoffrey K Pullum. (2017). The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. Chapter 5. §17.2.1] We have suggested that restrictions on the pairings of pronouns with antecedents ...
Mr. Wang's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
49 views

Can "the gender" refers to all people of one sex?

Netball was what females most likely chose to play here despite its unpopularity among the opposite gender. Does "the opposite gender" correctly refer to males in general here? By the way, ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
76 views

"While (the) stock(s) last(s)" (also, "out of stock" and "in stock")

Which of these is/are correct and why? while stocks last (as in e.g. Offer/promotion valid while stocks last) while stock last while stock lasts while the stocks last while the stock last while the ...
user182601's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
74 views

Is "the clock came alive" the opposite of "the clock went dead"?

One of the meanings of the adjective "dead" is having no power/electricity/battery. But I don't see the opposite adjective "alive" meaning having power/electricity/battery. We can ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
42 views

MAKING SUGGESTIONS - It+ MODAL + be a good idea to +infinitive (What Modals can logically be used with this structure)

"It might be a good idea to get home early." With this basic structure for offering a suggestion, we have the modal "might". Am I able to use other modals to communicate a ...
Alexander Jorgensen's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
35 views

Would you say "I would like to express my worries ON/IN or ABOUT"?

I know ABOUT is way more common but could you also use: ON? I asked ChatGPT (sorry) this same question and it gave me the following answer: "I would like to express my worries on the current ...
Daniel Costa González's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
90 views

"Collision" vs "Crash" --- If a ship hits a bridge, is it a crash or a collision?

"Baltimore Key Bridge collapses after ship collision" CNN-Baltimore bridge collapse The word "collision" has drawn my attention, because when I read it at first, it made me think ...
Yunus's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
45 views

What does "over" and "average" real mean here?

"your final list of grades showing an average overall grade of at least 80 and an average grade for Physics of at least 80 over the last three years of secondary high school." What I need to ...
traki's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
52 views

Usage of “nohow”

Is it okay to use nohow this way? Like there is no way I would even thought about it. I nohow thought that it would happen I nohow thought that you would come I nohow thought that she would say that
Boyep's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
149 views

Is it correct to say "I'll make up the time" or "I'll make up for the time"

Normally, after my daughter finishes her dinner, I let her watch TV for awhile up to 7:30pm. I will turn on the TV, she can not turn it on by herself. For example, if she finishes her dinner at 6:45 ...
Tom's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
249 views

Is it correct to say "I choked on water through my nose"?

When swimming, water might get into your nose suddenly and cause a short sharp pain in your sinus and a short time of breathing difficulty. We say "he choked on water" which implies the ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
25 views

What is the proper way to use articles in formula annotations?

English is not my native language. Recently I ran into a problem while writing a scientific paper. It seems like different authors use a/the articles in formula annotations differently, and I can't ...
nomad's user avatar
  • 11
-2 votes
1 answer
27 views

is it correct to say "Pull your forearms down at a right angle with your upper arms"?

I saw this sentence in Oxford dictionary Place the table at right angles/at a right angle to the wall I am sure if it means the table is in contact with the wall lengthways or widthways or not. It ...
Tom's user avatar
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-3 votes
1 answer
64 views

What is the contrast in "a warm coffee, though like a cappuccino"?

I've been using YouTube dialogue to practice my listening skills, and I came across this sentence in a Kate Brock video. I'm gonna be making a warm coffee, though like a cappuccino. I don't see the ...
nutcracker's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
42 views

how to say a group of people is more crowded in number compared to another

While male members were generally ______ in the first half of the period, female membership rose considerably to surpass that of males in the ensuing years. Should it be: predominant in number ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Past perfect tense "emphasize"

I understand that "he was warned from the moment he entered"is in the same timeline "Michael was warned from the moment he entered the factory that Andy was a local version of a grim ...
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 357
2 votes
2 answers
45 views

Can "bring out" be used in the sense of "manufacturing", "make", or "build"?

I've learnt that "bring out" means "to produce, to publish something, especially a CD or a book". So how far can it stretch? Can it be used in the sense of "manufacturing"...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
17 views

dedicate/devote money/time to sth

According to the OALD, both dedicate and devote can be used in the sense of "giving your time/money/effort to something". So are the following sentences correct? The US government’s budget [...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
95 views

Is "excruciatingly painful" a correct phrase to use in a sentence since "excruciating" already means very painful?

I have often come across the phrase "excruciatingly painful" in articles and even in short stories or novels, but is this a correct phrase? Since "excruciating" already means ...
Madhur's user avatar
  • 355
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

Present perfect and past simple by using since and ago

I know the use of tense and I need to say simply.But I want to more experience in mind free because I am not native speaker.To clear out in my mind and to understand more usage of present perfect ...
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 357
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

state of affairs vs situation

According to multiple dictionaries, state of affairs means the same as situation, so can I use either of them in the following sentence? Overall, the elderly were least vulnerable to poverty, while ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

What are the 2 different used of Must +present perfect forms?

She must have helped her ailing parents. Im the above sentence a guess is made about a past action that definitely or possibly happened.Can such structures be also used to express the wish of the ...
Altaf Jahangir's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Past perfect tense example

I passed high-school in 16 years old and later I joined Army. When I was 21 years old I had been an officer. Could I use past perfect as completed action above when I was 21 years old I had been an ...
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 357
2 votes
1 answer
57 views

Does "wash together" have a figurative malevolent meaning?

I mean like in the following sentence made up by me: XYZ washed science sceptics and flat-earthers together. Here, "washed together" would mean "conflate", with the conditions ...
Dávid Laczkó's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
247 views

Can the top and bottom having the same pattern be called "outfit"?

(Source) Women in hot countries often wears these clothes at home. The top and the bottom share the same pattern. Do you say "she is wearing an outfit"? (source) Or the above guy wears a T ...
Tom's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
59 views

'But then', 'but then again', 'then again' - same as 'although'?

I am confused about those but then, but then again and then again. Can I use them interchangeably? What I understand is those are similar as although. Can I use them as although when I translate ...
Thamilay's user avatar
  • 357
1 vote
3 answers
80 views

Do you say "half boarding school"?

I know that "boarding school" means students live in school and don't go home during the school year. They might go home on weekends. In Vietnam, we have 3 types of school. -Type 1: you get ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
74 views

How do you feel ? and How are you feeling?

Why a state verb FEEL is used in How are you feeling? question? I know it has also a dynamic meaning - touch or exemine -but in this question the meaning is different, in`t it
Tatiana Kirova's user avatar