Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
4 answers
59 views

Is a salary, by default, monthly or annual?

When they say, e.g. "a six-figure salary", do they mean a person earns that much per month or per year if no further details are included?
user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
789 views

Understanding "of" use in "all I could think of was"

As I drove to the police station, I tried to control alternating bouts of numbness and hysteria. Pacing the reception area, all I could think of was that he was only a few meters away from me, and ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

"Turn out" and "turn out to be "

Can I use "turn out" instead of "turn out to be" in sentences such as the one below, and omit the verb "to be" because I've used it in the the first part of my sentence: ...
user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
36 views

Meaning of “in capitals” [closed]

As I think back to that interaction in Brussels – with that gentleman in a suit saying, “your industry is just looking for a lifeline.” I remember my response was instinctive. I told him “It’s not our ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

"they offer different use cases" vs. "they serve different use cases"

I am writing an article explaining two similar algorithms. They are different in some aspects. I wanted to stress that they are used to solve different problems. I am not sure if the following ...
user avatar
  • 880
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

Can you use "gallows hill" as a general description for any execution site?

When I try to google "gallows hill" I find only references to specific places named Gallows Hill. My question is, is it possible to use (lowercase) gallows hill as a description for an ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

change vs. change up

She changed her daily routine. She changed up her daily routine. They say in U.S. informal English, 'up' is often added to 'change'. Could there be any difference in meaning between 'change' and '...
user avatar
  • 2,705
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

Usage of lowlife

I checked the meaning of 'lowlife' on two different dictionaries: Cambridge Dictionary a person who exists by criminal activities or has a way of life that most people disapprove of Merriam-Webster ...
user avatar
  • 63
27 votes
1 answer
6k views

Why is it "your" and not "yours" in "to see your on Amazon account activity"

I have read on the Amazon Pay page: You can find all your off Amazon account activity here. Click Amazon Orders below to see your on Amazon account activity. Why does it say "your"? As far ...
user avatar
  • 1,953
1 vote
1 answer
14 views

Looking for the proper word in a sentence about exams

I'm trying to find the proper word, but there are a lot of options and I don't know which one fits best. I studied this material last night and it ___ on the exam. I'm thinking of the below words, ...
user avatar
  • 4,720
0 votes
2 answers
15 views

Asking about the business hours of the concierge of my apartment building

I moved to an apartment where we have a concierge at the front desk of the building and I wanted to ask him about his business hours, i.e. when he would show up at the front desk. Is the following way ...
user avatar
  • 880
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

What is the best one to be used? Today is Sunday or It's Sunday today.?

What is the best one to be used? What ones are 100% correct? Today is Sunday or It's Sunday today? Is that correct too -> "Today it's Sunday"? And one more question, What about these: &...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
114 views

Is my understanding of the word "Malaise" correct?

The word "malaise" has three definitions, according to Merriam Webster. Definitions of malaise - 1: an indefinite feeling of debility or lack of health often indicative of or accompanying ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
20 views

What other words/phrases can I use in place of "train of thought"?

Consider this hypothetical scenario, Person1: Front End software development does not require analytical ability. Person2: You are misinformed, I used to follow the same train of thought/way of ...
user avatar
  • 8,179
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

'Unhide' Is Commonly Used, Why Doesn't It Appear on Any Vocabulary?

I noticed that the word 'unhide' it's widely used, though a quick research on multiple vocabularies didn't bring anything relevant up. This word is extremely common in IT when talking about files, for ...
user avatar
  • 13
0 votes
1 answer
23 views

"Survive" vs. "rescue" [closed]

Which one is correct? The rope survives the car from falling into the well. Or The rope rescues the car from falling into the well.
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
20 views

What do it refer to in the long with structure?

In the article "Exploring the sea-floor" from "science survey" written by T.F.Gaskell: Since the sea covers the greater part of the earth's surface,it is quite reasonable to ...
user avatar
  • 1,127
0 votes
2 answers
33 views

The word demand is verb or noun in my sentence?

In "Patients and doctors" (Kenneth Walker), it says The great advantage of taking medicine is that it makes no demands on the taker beyond that of putting up for a moment with a disgusting ...
user avatar
  • 1,127
5 votes
9 answers
2k views

Idiomatic word for someone who is an expert in multiple fields/subject?

Cricket is a very popular sport in India. It has three components, batting (offense in baseball), bowling (pitching in baseball), and fielding (defense in baseball). Generally, players are good at ...
user avatar
  • 8,179
0 votes
3 answers
56 views

What does "unhorsed by fences" mean?

And is a coordinating conjunction. We use and to connect two or more words, phrases, clauses or prefixes together: There is a sentence in "new concept english" book4(new edition),lesson 21: ...
user avatar
  • 1,127
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

"came" meaning in context [closed]

I saw a word of which I could not find any meaning matched with the context in several dictionaries. After a long journey of sailing, the ship was wrecked by angry wind. A man who was on board ...
user avatar
  • 428
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Why didn't the example here use "too"?

I was reading about excess and in one of the examples I found this, They both eat to excess. Why didn't this use 'too' instead of 'to'? It does not make sense to me, I don't know why.
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

Can I use "whose" as the relative word of "country" in an arrtributive clause? [closed]

For example, in the sentence below: All the countries _____ life expectancy dropped had taken an average of 5 years to achieve just a one-year increase in life expectancy. Can I use "whose"...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

The terms have been agreed. vs. The terms have been agreed to

The terms have been agreed. vs. The terms have been agreed to. The verb 'agree' is used as 'transitive or intransitive'. I wonder which sentence is more common: with 'to' or without 'to' in case of ...
user avatar
  • 2,705
1 vote
1 answer
32 views

Why is "plummet", as an intransitive verb, followed by a noun?

Consumer confidence plummeted a breathtaking 15 points, to its lowest level in ten years. The cable just snapped. The elevator plummeted ten flights. Stock prices plummeted 40 percent during the ...
user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
26 views

casual alternative for the word "emit" in the context of energy

Consider this hypothetical expression, My relative is personification of bad vibes. He is always emitting negative energy. I am looking for a casual idiomatic alternative for the word "emission&...
user avatar
  • 8,179
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Earning money or wages?

Which word is correct? I believe today's younger generation are more attracted by flexible working hours than by the thought of earning money / wages. (Cullen, French, and Jakeman (2014) The ...
user avatar
  • 169
1 vote
1 answer
35 views

Can the word 'emotion' be used to described a long-term feeling?

I came across cases like 'someone was overcome with emotion', and they all, in some sense, refer to a temporary feeling. For example, the sentence mentioned above uses 'emotion' to refer to the ...
user avatar
  • 653
-1 votes
1 answer
24 views

The university bestowed an honorary degree on her (vs. to her)

The university bestowed an honorary degree on her. (O) The university bestowed an honorary degree to her. (X) If 'to' is not used, why it is not used? When you use 'on' instead of 'for/to' as in the ...
user avatar
  • 2,705
2 votes
4 answers
184 views

"Support to do" or "Support doing"

I am writing features for our product, such as: Support to repair corrupt Outlook PST file. Support to recover message body and subject. ... Here Support is used as a verb instead of noun. It is an ...
user avatar
  • 71
0 votes
2 answers
26 views

meaning of get in got much less wear

I am not sure of the meaning of: Rugs in the bedrooms got much less wear. A sentence I read from a dictionary Entry 5 According to the sentence above, could we say we can clean rugs in the bedrooms ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
15 views

"Land" on the pointer?

Consider the following spinning (spinner?) wheel: The wheel spins. When it stops, an option (A, B, or C) lands on the pointer (dark gray). Is land on the right phrase? I'm not very sure, because the ...
user avatar
  • 7,039
0 votes
1 answer
28 views

"Out" in "branch out"

Example sentence: The path branches (out) into three small paths. Is out necessary? Why or why not?
user avatar
  • 7,039
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

What word can I use in place of "facilities"? [closed]

Consider this hypothetical expression, The event was a philanthropic one, whose aim was to raise money for the under-privileged, which will be used to provide facilities for them. Facility in ...
user avatar
  • 8,179
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

How a word, a phrase or an idiom currently considered informal turns to be standard or formal

The other day I was listening to a videobook titled David Copperfield by Charles Dickens, and encountered this idiom: cut up rough English is my fourth language, I've never lived in an English-...
user avatar
  • 287
3 votes
3 answers
747 views

"Those" seventy dollars or "that" seventy dollars?

"Those" seventy dollars or "that" seventy dollars? E.g. Jack needed those/that seventy dollars. To me "those" sounds more likely because seventy is clearly plural, but ...
user avatar
  • 1,327
0 votes
1 answer
23 views

What verb is applicable for "prescription tablet/pills consumption"?

Consider the hypothetical expression, I fell sick, because I was slacking on my thyroid's pill consumption. "Consumption" as a noun feels very awkward to me, can somebody suggest an ...
user avatar
  • 8,179
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

What word would describe 'pick me up' for coffee like beverage

Consider this expression, Most people drink coffee for taste, I on the other hand drink for feeling energized/invigorated in the morning.. What would be an idiomatic alternative for pick me up (in ...
user avatar
  • 8,179
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

"Get out of" vs "get out from"

I used this sentence yesterday, " Get out of my class". A student suddenly pointed out saying isn't it in correct and further added that get out from my class should be the correct way to do ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
27 views

Take a toll on X versus take a toil on X [closed]

"Your majesty, the princess is just tired from using too much strength... also, the silver she came in contact with took a toil on her!" I see both, but just realized they don't mean the ...
user avatar
  • 2,237
0 votes
4 answers
48 views

What alternative word/phrase can I use in place of tryst? [closed]

Consider the hypothetical phrase, Google's tryst with hardware came in the form of Google Nexus phone product line, previously it was an exclusive software company. "tryst" feels too ...
user avatar
  • 8,179
0 votes
1 answer
22 views

What is opposite of "inherit" verb from the point of view of parents?

Consider the expression, I inherited mental illness from my parents. Inheritance means picking up something from parents. What is the opposite of inheritance, with regards to parents. i.e. when ...
user avatar
  • 8,179
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

What does for mean in `if it were not for the protection`?

I have read the sentence in "new concept english" book4 lesson2: Insects would make it impossible for us to live in the world; they would devour all our flocks and herds, if it were not for ...
user avatar
  • 1,127
1 vote
1 answer
34 views

Meanings of 'topple'

Topple means overbalance or cause to overbalance and fall, but e.g. Wiktionary apparently gives some other meanings: (transitive) To push, throw over, overturn or overthrow something. Is 'topple' ...
user avatar
  • 147
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

Which is correct "One of my friend" or "One of my friends" [duplicate]

I am confused in the two statements One of my friend or One of my friends The second seems logically correct to me as we are talking about one of the people from a group of people so that group should ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

what verb/adjective would describe clickbait headline [closed]

Clickbaits headline are a norm these days. If I have to describe the meaning of clickbait, what verb/adjective should I use? The headline was seductive. The headline was tempting. The headline was ...
user avatar
  • 8,179
0 votes
2 answers
31 views

maybe vs. may be

maybe vs. may be I wonder, if spoken fast, how do native speakers differentiate the two? Would there be any advice?
user avatar
  • 2,705
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Use of the verb "edge"

How clear are these sentences? Fighters are often edged to injuries. She is prone to edge herself to threat. She has started to edge herself to feel the wind. In slang, the verb to edge has the ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
29 views

Is it correct to say "I dodged my arm away from his punch"?

Normally, we say "a man + dodge + the thing that is moving to him". For example, "he dodged the bullet", "he dodged the punch". Can we say "a man + dodge + a part of ...
user avatar
  • 15.9k
0 votes
2 answers
46 views

Is it correct to say "He is lying passing out on the floor"?

We can have some adjectives standing after "lie". For example, "he is lying awake on the bed" and "the dog is lying dead on the floor" Now, "to pass out" means &...
user avatar
  • 15.9k

1
3 4
5
6 7
207