Questions tagged [writing]

For questions specifically related to written English.

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speaker name and action in direct speech

I am trying to write a story in English, though English is not my mother language. I would like to know if any of the two following lines is correct, and which is better: "I talked to Bob," ...
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29 views

Why does a sentence start with "For some people..........." where "Some people" is the subject of the sentence?

"For some people, no matter how much sleep they get, they still feel tired and low in energy. Why?" BBC-why some people always feel tired "Some people" is the subject of the ...
Yunus's user avatar
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3 answers
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Which (if any) of these three alternative sentence constructions is most understandable for use in function documentation comments? [closed]

I'm writing documentation (i.e. code comments) for a JavaScript function with multiple parameters. In specifying the purposes of each of the parameters, I have encountered some difficulty in making ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
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1 answer
50 views

Using gerund vs. relative pronoun in sentences: "A set S that consists of x, y, z is called.." vs "A set S consisting of x, y, z is called..."

I saw many sentences with the following pattern: A set S consisting of x, y, z is called..., which uses the gerund form of the verb "consist". Considering another sentence that I created ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
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1 answer
41 views

Inclusive meaning

These example sentences are from Cambridge dictionary. One thing I can't understand is the use of the word inclusive. If I omit it, does it mean the same? The other example is the same. I don't know ...
Rafeq's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
70 views

If this capital letter F is acceptable or not [closed]

Is the F in the picture an acceptable capital letter? As the length of the lower horizontal line equals to the upper horizontal line. This is not a font question. That’s a very basic question or a ...
monique Yeung's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

Holds no benefits to alleviate the problem

Two people are arguing/quarrel and the arguing/quarrel they have will not alleviate the problem the already have. It is like someone telling him that stop arguing/quarrel that won't alleviate the ...
Rafeq's user avatar
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0 answers
45 views

Adjective plus noun in a sentence

When describing a charts, Is there a way to use adjective plus noun other than using there is or there was. Can I say, the consumption of fast food had a gradual increase over the years. The mobile ...
Rafeq's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
92 views

synonym for "The number of"

I am describing a chart in the past. Is this sentence correct? What word can I use as synonym for "The number of" According to the chart, the number of people who preferred fast food ...
Rafeq's user avatar
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1 answer
59 views

The difference between "Each cake's piece" and "Each piece of the cake"

The difference between "Each cake's piece" and "Each piece of the cake". What's the correct option to use when writing IELTS writing task 1 discussing a pie chart? Example: "...
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-1 votes
1 answer
51 views

What's the best way to avoid repeating the name of the subject in a formal letter?

What's the best way to avoid repeating the name of the subject in the letter? Assuming that I need to refer to the same person in a formal letter multiple times, what's the formal way to do so? For ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
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2 answers
37 views

Incline[d] bench?

While reading about weight lifting, it's common to bump into mentions of incline benches. There's the "incline bench press" exercise, for example, which is a bench press variation used on an ...
Apollo's user avatar
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1 answer
82 views

Why did they use single and not double quotes in this news headline?

'King Charles should feel justified - he's defied predictions the monarchy would crumble'
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
23 views

Combinig past and present tenses together

I've made a discovery that a phrase to be out of the question is an idiom, meaning to be an event that cannot possibly happen. In a book (Charlotte Bronte - "Jane Eyre") I approached the ...
Stone Paul's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
719 views

If we don't know the name and gender, what should we write? [duplicate]

Hello everyone. Think you don't know the name and gender of a person. What should we write? Let's see this example: Yesterday someone on internet helped me to write a better letter, but unfortunately, ...
Sajjad Khorrami's user avatar
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1 answer
43 views

What's the difference in "throw clothes away" and "throw away clothes"?

Does it change the meaning of the sentence? Are both correct grammar? In writing any kind of writing, which one is better to use?
username ishere's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

Valediction for a team / group

I am writing a letter starting with 'Dear recruiting team,' (multiple recipients, not addressed by name). Is 'Yours faithfully' the proper valediction for ending this letter? Edit: It is for a British ...
Olaf's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
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Should the suffix "III" be included in the salutation to a senator

The rule for the salutation in a letter to a senator is: Dear Senator (Surname) Should the Surname include their suffix, specifically "III" as in 'the third'. For a Senator Rober Smith III, ...
TechWriterTen's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
119 views

Does this sound rude? How could I have said it better?

Me: Good afternoon, ma'am Josie. Just letting you know I'm ready for the interview. Could you please let me know if it will still happen this afternoon? Thank you. Josie: Hello. You were scheduled for ...
alex1923's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
185 views

"One of the reasons why ..." vs "One of the reasons (no why) ..." [duplicate]

Will the words "One of the reasons why I ..." be considered wordy? Should I just write "One of the reasons I ..." or there is no much difference between them ?
Qiulang 邱朗's user avatar
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2 answers
95 views

What are the common greetings when writing to an acquaintance (not necessarily a close friend)?

What are the common greetings when writing to an acquaintance (or someone not necessarily a close friend)? Is "how are you" or "how are you doing these days" too casual in writing ?...
Qiulang 邱朗's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
170 views

Is this statement correct : "Certificate of Winner/Champion in English Debating Championship 2022"?

I'd like to know how to write a statement in a cover letter telling people about a certificate that I got after winning an English debate. in my application letter where I wrote down like this: For ...
Abita Yay's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
65 views

Is this usage of apostrophe grammatical: "the person with dementia’s employer"

This is from a booklet about caring for elderly people who has dementia: "requesting flexible working arrangements from your employer and the person with dementia’s employer." When I read it,...
Yunus's user avatar
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60 views

Comparison of two categories over a specific period of time

Year: 2009 / 2019 Mobile use: 15% / 26% Tablet use: 5% / 19% what is the correct way to describe changes in two different years? I have tried to describe the changes in three different ...
DrDentMBR's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
210 views

Do they consider typos as misspellings in computer delivered IELTS?

I mean there's a difference between a misspelling and a typo, e.g. the word "circulate" is considered misspelled if it's "circilate" or "cerculate", but if it's circukate ...
Michael Adams's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
35 views

which one is more appropriate? indicate: ... or indicate

I'm writing to describe a cartoon, and there's a caption that means "on the road" below the cartoon. should I write 1: The caption indicates: "On the road". or 2: The caption ...
Cc11111's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
647 views

How to write a book title, subtitle, edition and author in a work email?

I'm requesting that my organization upload a digital version of a book and I want to make sure they give me the correct one. I would like to include the following information in my request. Book title,...
Daniel Ward's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
362 views

Difference between "Why is this so?" and "Give reasons for this and solutions?"

In IELTS writing task 2, I saw some questions such as the following, Why is this so? Give reasons for this and solutions? Here, the IDP asked to answer in the following essay structure (paragraph-...
Ishrat Hossain's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
72 views

WRITING: Is there any grammatical rule that prohibits multiple topics in one paragraph?

I came across an educator who teaches students to limit the number of topic sentence to only one(he is not a native English speaker). Is this a widely agreed,valid rule for writing?Has there been such ...
homeostasisレ's user avatar
-1 votes
3 answers
67 views

Am I asked to express my opinion?

In IELTS band descriptor, it is clearly written that I have to mention a position and stick to it throughout the essay from Introduction to Conclusion. Band 9: “presents a fully developed position“ ...
Ishrat Hossain's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
67 views

How to identify ambiguous sentence?

'The theoretical arguments regulating home schooling begin from this point.' I have no idea why this sentence is ambiguous. Although the answer says 'It leaves the reader guessing whether the ...
Jokerjh777's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
75 views

When asking about a health condition which tense do you use? [duplicate]

If a person got injured, in their legs, for example, yesterday and you want to ask that person the next day how are their legs doing. Do you say "how were your legs?" or "how are your ...
Rosé Cop.'s user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
166 views

When asking about cast and crews of a movie which tense do you use?

When I search up on Google I normally see both present tense and past tense being used. For example: Who plays Willy Wonka?Or Who played Willy Wonka?. What’s the difference? It confuses me to be ...
Uni123's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
277 views

Has understood or had understood?

I'm doing some essays to prepare for the C1 writing test. I wrote this sentence: "after a student had understood a formula, it would be more efficient if he was able to apply it through ...
Olena Igorivna Davydova's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

pull a face in shock?

What's the correct expression? I'm not a native speaker. I want to describe that he made a expression of shock; like pulled a face in shock; but I feel that's wrong. How can I see it concisely?
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
296 views

Is there a reason that some wikipedia pages use "BC" while others use "BCE"?

On https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augustus it says: Born Gaius Octavius 23 September 63 BC Rome, Italy, Roman Republic Died 19 August AD 14 (aged 75) Nola, Italy, Roman Empire On https://en....
AGamePlayer's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
822 views

Is year's full form hyphenated in English?

Someone said In English year's full is only written with the last two numbers hyphenated. So, if I am talking about the year 2121, should I write it as twenty one twenty-one?
Werner's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
69 views

Can these two sentences coexist in the same contexts? [closed]

Can sentence “the white semicircle became black” and “the white semicircle disappeared” coexist in the same contexts? Or are they two different interpretations? I’m preparing for some exam.
user09827's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
119 views

long title without verb

As a non-native English speaker I know that English requires verbs in every sentence, but I don't know if it is the case for the long title (a title of a subsection in academic article). Example for ...
Ben's user avatar
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0 answers
20 views

How many types of starting sentences are there?

___ about payments and account balances should be directed to our billing department. (A.): to inquire (B.): inquired (C.): inquires (D.): inquire in the test, said was the right answer is (C.): ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
59 views

How to ask someone to complete a sentence, like on a test or exercise?

“I know that I’m good at singing.” “I know that ________.” I want to make someone form the first sentence by adding a clause to the second one. In this situation, can I say, “Write that you’re good ...
user09827's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the difference between inner, internal, and interior conflict? [closed]

What is the difference between inner, internal, and interior conflict? Can we use the term "interior"? If no, why?
Sophie's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
124 views

About Difference Between ' and " in the Title

I have a YouTube channel and i don't want to any mistake on grammar or syntax. Which one is true? I saw a lot of news channel and all of them using different types. Is all of them can be used? For ...
XcellentEEE's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
5k views

Are "as of writing" and "at the time of writing" both correct?

I see that 'at the time of writing' is grammatically correct (Is 'at the time of writing' correct?). Is this replaceable with 'as of writing'?
Jay Lee's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
97 views

Reduced adjective/adverb clause with past action/completed event

Original sentence: 1) "Authorities are investigating whether a man who allegedly drove an SUV into a holiday parade in Waukesha, Wis., killing five people and injuring more than 40, was fleeing ...
Airforce's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
4k views

"Please confirm immediately'' vs ''Please confirm at your earliest convenience''

I took a test about choosing the appropriate salutation in writing a business letter. The question tells: "If you want someone to act immediately, you can write:..."? I answered: "...
EnglishLearner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
57 views

Plural or singular verbs with lists of single elements

Another plural/singular verb question that I feel must have been asked before but cannot find a good example on ELL or the usual grammar websites. I know the rules for compound subjects. The dog and ...
Mr. T's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
192 views

at the same time as or at the same time when

The sentence: At the same time as the value of x decreases, the variable y and its absolute value decrease. Can we use when instead as? At the same time when the value of x decreases, the variable ...
Ben's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
142 views

Can I say "Whatever You Did Do?"

I am writing a song about forgiveness and "It does not matter what you did do" perfectly fits into the rhyme scheme while "It doesn't matter what you did" does not. How awkward ...
Hannah's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
41 views

Using imperative form as a Product Feature

I am preparing my RGB Keyboard Product's features. Is it okay to use imperative form? and Are the following sentences correct? Change the colors from the app on the phone by connecting via Bluetooth. ...
Segeta33's user avatar

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