All Questions

1
vote
1answer
1k views

When 'but' means 'exception', what if we put 'not'?

From StoneyB's answer: You may clench grass or earth or soil, but the ground. I know this structure and have read this at many places. It's perfectly fine. But then, is this sentence redundant/...
3
votes
2answers
29k views

Difference between “In front of” and “In the front of”

I am learning the duolingo English course. In some sentences, they use In front of, but the others use In the front of. Would you please let me know what is the difference between those two? Thanks
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Does my sentence structure and the vocabulary make sense? [closed]

Helpless I screamed in pain, clenching the ground beside me, as my mind thought back to the moment that led me to my unknown fate. Does this sentence make sense and have good structure?
19
votes
8answers
6k views

Which way: One and one ARE two? One and one IS two?

Which verb is grammatically correct when used to describe addition? One and one are two. One and one is two.
2
votes
3answers
382 views

The usage of a comma with conjunctions

I am a little confused about the usage of a comma in sentences with conjunctions. For example: Dairying is concerned not only with the production of milk but with the manufacture of milk products. ...
3
votes
4answers
943 views

What is this “much?”

I saw this sentence in an article in the New Yorker: The question is as much philosophical as it is scientific, since the answer depends on how these terms get defined. I came up with my own ...
2
votes
2answers
723 views

Can every A or B plus singular form of verb be possible?

“Every town and city has areas like this.” (source) When I first came across this clause, I thought it might have wrong verb form of has instead of have. Now I can understand why there is has. But it ...
2
votes
3answers
623 views

Pointing out someone in a photograph

How should I refer to someone in a photograph with language? I know expressions like "the second girl on the right", but what should I say about "the first girl to the right"? Does "rightmost" sound ...
2
votes
2answers
182 views

'using' as preposition in the beginning of the sentence

Can 'using' correctly be used as a preposition in the beginning of the sentence and if so, is this structure natural, formal ? What are other alternatives. Here's the example: Using ..., somebody ...
4
votes
2answers
6k views

Difference between “ in a row” and “at a stretch”

There is a sentence, "He would study for eight to ten hours at a stretch." If I say, "He would study for eight to ten hours in a row.", does the meaning the same? The dictionary says that "in a row" ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Conditional Sentence Using IF and HAD

What is use Diffrence between below two conditional Sentence. Had I been present at the Creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better ordering of the universe. And If i had present ...
0
votes
2answers
231 views

Which is the correct construct - “Is … there” or “Is there …”?

I try construct a question. Which variant is correct? Is any task there? Is there any task? What I must use in answer - one or ones to avoid unnecessary repetition in this context?
0
votes
3answers
68 views

“war-concomitant event” as a adjectival phrase

Can I use "war-concomitant" with a hyphen as adjectival phrase? I am aware that I can say "an event concomitant with war", but I need to use it as"war-concomitant" as in "war-concomitant event" for ...
2
votes
3answers
265 views

Which part of the sentence does “for about 1.4 million pounds” modify?

The Martins sold their house for about 1.4 million pounds. I have two explanations of the this sentence: (1) The Martins sold their house in order to get about 1.4 million pounds. (2) The Martins ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Which part of the sentence does “for you” modify?

I have some free advice for you. Does "for you" modify "some free advice "? Or it modifies "I have some free advice" ? Which one is correct? Is "for you " a post-positioned modifier or a sentence ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

How can I say about my marks at university?

I want to say to my friends or parents about my marks at university. How can I do it right? For instance, I've got 9 marks out of 10 for my last homework. How can I say about that I got the highest ...
0
votes
2answers
112 views

What's the meaning of “biased”? [closed]

in a reporter in NME magazine have a question "Are you biased?". This reporter talk about race and problems about racism. Thanks!
0
votes
1answer
5k views

Should I say “encouragement to me” or “encouragement for me”?

Are the following correct in grammar, and if not, how can I correct it? "Thanks for his encouragement for me to apply to graduate schools" "Thanks for his encouragement to me to apply to graduate ...
5
votes
1answer
981 views

What does “ground” mean as a verb here?

People learn language through exposure to a rich perceptual context. Language is grounded by mapping words, phrases, and sentences to meaning representations referring to the world. Does "ground"...
0
votes
1answer
480 views

English expressions for exam : Document synthesis [closed]

In a few days I will pass an English exam (Document synthesis) and I would like to know if there exist some little known English (UK please) expressions that can be placed in the introduction and the ...
2
votes
2answers
15k views

Does “as shown follows” sound right?

Is "as shown follows" the right way to say it? Here is a generic example: If X, then Y should be organized as shown follows: If it actually is ok, does it sound natural or should I replace it with ...
0
votes
1answer
257 views

What does this quote mean here? By James Fenimore Cooper

A refined simplicity is the characteristic of all high bred deportment, in every country, and a considerate humanity should be the aim of all beneath it. It seems to mean "All the high bred! They ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

To give the folks a boot

On page 234 of Peter Benchley’s Jaws, there is an expression whose meaning I can’t get: “Watch this. This always gives the folks a boot” Would you please help me to understand it?
1
vote
1answer
260 views

Is it strange to say “be geek”?

I know the word "geek" is noun and adjective form is "geeky", so it is grammatically incorrect to say "be geek". But putting grammar aside, does "be geek" still sound strange? More background and ...
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

What does 'It seemed to me, soothed by the elysian air, a Naiad was beside me." mean?

What does this strange construction mean here? It seemed to me, soothed by the elysian air, a Naiad was beside me. Is this construction possible?
3
votes
2answers
55 views

“Will make and will continue” or “ will make and continue”

The Group will make strategic move to strengthen its market shares and will continue to invest in product design and development. Can I omit the second "will" and write as:- The Group will make ...
2
votes
1answer
857 views

'Help someone 'with' something' - is it always the structure?

These sentences are commonly found on the Internet and in the books... My mother helped me with homework. My sister helped me with shopping. Is it always like that? "....helped [someone] with [...
1
vote
1answer
922 views

“Supposed to” - past/present usage

I found this examples in my grammar book. John is supposed to have helped Mary with shopping. It was supposed to be warm today. Both sentences are translated that something was about to ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

“Want to go look for something” - what is the verb? [duplicate]

1) I want to go look for my wedding dress today. 2) I want to go to look for my wedding dress today. Are these both acceptable ways to say this? Also, could someone point out the parts of speech? ...
1
vote
1answer
148 views

Have I got the 50 guys for you!

Based on the American sitcom Friends S04E10: Transcription of "The One With the Girl From Poughkeepsie" Have I got the 50 guys for you! From the construction, I thought it should be a question. But ...
3
votes
3answers
548 views

past perfect or past simple why?

Is it possible to write that "My cat caught 3 mice today." I think it is better to use present perfect: "My cat has caught 3 mice today" because the cat may catch another one or many more till the ...
5
votes
2answers
663 views

Punctuation in sarcastic question with suggested answer?

How do you correctly format a sarcastic question that includes a suggested answer? Like... Where did you get your license: the back of a cereal box? Is that correct? It seems wrong to make it two ...
1
vote
1answer
391 views

it's bad enough ( having to / to have to / to ) read

Please clarify the difference between each option in the sentence below. I would never use "got decapitated" in a formal report unless I was quoting a witness who said that, because it's bad ...
1
vote
2answers
626 views

Whereas vs While

In the following text is it also correct to use while instead of whereas?: The start of a romance with the much older Padmé Amidala (played by Natalie Portman) was difficult to believe, as Lloyd ...
0
votes
2answers
85 views

Broader Sanctions

In this article President Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Friday ratcheted up the threat of economic backlash against Russia, saying they are preparing broader sanctions if Moscow ...
3
votes
1answer
173 views

Meaning of “the vanquishing of something”

In this NPR news excerpt, it says: At one point, Shepard has director Ishiro Honda explain why the vanquishing of Godzilla feels so sad, and his words sum up brilliantly what gives Godzilla its ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

What does “critic-at-large” mean?

In this NPR news excerpt, it says: But first let's turn to our critic-at-large, John Powers, who says seeing "Godzilla" again has made him nostalgic for old monster movies. What does critic-at-...
3
votes
3answers
216 views

“was decapitated” or “got decapitated”

Could someone please tell me if it would sound better if I replaced was with got in the text below? In the Vietnam War, Bob Walker had been a helicopter mechanic, and he’d watched as his best ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

“Were not doing” versus “would not do” versus “had not been doing”

In my previous organisation we were not doing so much of work. In my previous organisation we would not do so much of work. Do both the sentences mean the same thing or there is any difference? ...
0
votes
1answer
270 views

Milk chocolate -> (eating or drinking)?

Which one sounds natural to you? A) I'm eating milk chocolate. B) I'm drinking milk chocolate.
1
vote
1answer
371 views

What does this “since” mean?

It was distressing to see how much he'd aged these last few months since he'd battled with the decision to put the shop up for sale. It means the same as "He hasn't eaten anything since this morning"?...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

What does “life is far too important to ever talk seriously about” mean?

Life is far too important to ever talk seriously about. -Oscar Wilde What does this mean? Is it something like "life is very important, so we can never ever talk about it seriously?"
6
votes
2answers
7k views

How to refer to things, living things

I have some troubles in understanding what pronoun to use when referring to things be they inanimate things, living things, wild, tamed animals or pets, for I saw either use. When referring to a lion,...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Would you please help me to understand the difference between “just then” and “that’s when”?

Consider the following examples: Just then he saw the fish. That’s when he saw the fish. Is there any difference in meaning between these examples?
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Using 'fluctuation' in a bar chart

I am wondering, can 'fluctuation' be mentioned in a bar chart like this: the bar chart depicts the fluctuation of the number of pets per certain category.
1
vote
3answers
3k views

Arguably vs unarguably?

I get the theoretical difference between the 2 words, unarguably means you cannot question the point. But, given the sentence "Unarguably he is an excellent _", how does replacing unarguably with ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Would you please help me to understand the following sentence?

On page 187 of Peter Benchley’s Jaws I came across the following sentence: “If you’d testify, you might be able to slap a loan-sharking rap on these guys.” I can’t get the meaning of the expression ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

Usage of 'shall' in questions

Let's say I want to arrange a lesson with my coach and I say: Shall we have a lesson on Monday? I understand the use of 'shall' in American English is considered to be formal, whereas this is not ...
27
votes
1answer
2k views

Uses of the definite article (the) in generic noun phrases

I was reading a paragraph about lions and I came up with a question about the definite article (the). Let me tell you first what I know about it. 1->We use the before a singular noun (when we are ...
2
votes
3answers
5k views

“Where she at?” versus “Where is she?”

Where she at? (The ? actually was used in subtitle, although sounds like an indirect question – a man was searching for a woman in a crowded room.) Where is she? I heard the first one in the ...

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