All Questions

1
vote
1answer
180 views

The verb “to overlook” embraces the opposite meanings?

One of the meanings of the verb to overlook is "to provide a view of" (the chateau overlooks fields of olive trees), when it gives you the possibility of seeing. The other meaning is "to fail to ...
3
votes
1answer
307 views

What are the meanings of the participial phrase and the verb-less clause?

From you have I been absent in the spring, When proud-pied April dress'd in all his trim Hath put a spirit of youth in every thing That heavy Saturn laugh'd and leap'd with him. Yet nor the lays ...
-1
votes
1answer
146 views

Why are these present perfect? [closed]

From you have I been [A] absent in the spring, When proud-pied April dress'd in all his trim Hath put [A’] a spirit of youth in every thing That heavy Saturn laugh'd and leap'd [B] with him. Yet ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

efficacy vs. efficiency

I've got troubles perceiving the difference in meaning between these terms. They have different Latin roots which means they have to be different (efficacy—efficacia, efficiency—...
3
votes
2answers
794 views

Why do you say “to the movies”

What structures do stand behind the expression the movies (we're going to the movies)? It confuses me that it is plural (movies) and with the definite article (the). It seems that in the same way you ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

When should I use “caution” instead of “warning” and vice versa?

Can you tell me in which context I should use caution and warning? Caution seems more formal, and more serious than warning. Caution can imply fatal, while warning refers to errors or mistakes.
0
votes
1answer
148 views

Is there a word for online-only jerks?

Is there a word, phrase or urban saying for people who appears polite and reasonable in real life, but is rude and trolling everything on the internet?
2
votes
1answer
158 views

*get your sh–t together*

In a forum thread, someone posted a video of a guy throwing a racoon down the stairs because the racoon was fighting with his dog (named Toaster). One user commented: Get your shit together ...
0
votes
1answer
140 views

Did I understand the third conditional correctly?

All of these are sentences I would like write in the Third Conditional: 1: I would have gone by taxi, if I had had enough money. 2: He gladly would have taken his children for a walk, if he ...
2
votes
1answer
505 views

Difference between 'feel' and 'feel like' in this context?

Let's say I am talking to my friend, and he says I feel like taking a week off at work. and I want to say Why do you feel like that/ feel that? Which of these two expression is idiomatic here? ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What is a canvas tent that is used for emergency/survival called in English?

Is there something like 'canvas tent' (translation for Polish 'płachta namiotowa' suggested by Google Translate), or this has some other name? This is what I mean: It's not a tent, it can be ...
3
votes
3answers
443 views

Looking for an English word that means all kinds of educational texts

What word English speakers use to name educational texts in general - textbooks, tutorial, educational and encyclopedia articles. In my native language there is such word - it meaning covers ...
1
vote
1answer
293 views

Using articles in a catch-phrase

I face an issue with a catch-phrase on my site. English is not my native language, and I just can't solve this issue. I have a catch-phrase, and by the rules of grammar, it needs the article an: ...
0
votes
2answers
666 views

Which form and when? “counterclockwise” vs “anticlockwise”

Which term is more used in everyday English and which in formal/professional environment?
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“A part” or “parts”?

When you refer to a generalized part of a generalized plural noun, should I use "a part" or "parts"? do you have to use " city names" as "a part/parts" of " commercial addresses"? This is the only ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Can 'all' be used as a predicative complement?

"But what are you going to do with it [= dragon’s egg] when it's hatched?" said Hermione. "Well, I've bin doin' some readin', said Hagrid, pulling a large book from under his pillow. "Got this ...
2
votes
3answers
24k views

“Device got hanged” or “Device got hung”

If i have to report an event that took place earlier, what is better to report, "The device got hung" or "The device got hanged"? The current status of the event is unknown; it is still happening or ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

“Amazonia” vs “Amazon”

Which form is preferred when we speak about the region in South America and not the Amazon river? Do we need to use the definite article before Amazon and no article at all before Amazonia? "There ...
1
vote
3answers
9k views

what's the difference between “the summer holiday” and “the summer holidays”?

"I'll go to visit my aunt in England as soon as the summer holidays start." Does "the summer holidays" refer to many days in the holiday, or many different summer holidays? I prefer to regard the ...
0
votes
2answers
10k views

“She has passed the exam, therefore she can work in the company directly.”

Which of the following two sentences is correct? She has passed the exam, therefore she can work in the company directly. She has passed the exam and, therefore, she can work in the company ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

“They have been exempted” vs. “they are exempted”

What is the difference in meaning between the following two sentences? They have been exempted from paying tax. They are exempted from paying tax. Are both sentences grammatically correct?
0
votes
1answer
160 views

such like doing? and the use of the word “earn”

A may mean an event, or an event's profit such like earn 10 dollars in one gambling game. Is there any problem in using earning? like is an prep and after the present participle? And in a gambling ...
0
votes
3answers
6k views

How can I tell the difference between “an hour” meaning “per hour” versus “in one hour's time”?

The "an" can be used as a preposition with the meaning of "per": My rate is $10 an hour. Also it can be a used as a determiner: I will be ready in an hour. How can I tell these 2 apart?
0
votes
2answers
17k views

Do you need help vs do you need any help

Is there a difference between thses two sentences? Do you need help (studying for the test)? vs Do you need any help (studying for the test)? I wonder if they can be interchangeable when I ...
1
vote
2answers
113 views

Word for visiting infant and parents

In Dutch, we have the word kraamvisite or kraambezoek, which is a visit to a newborn baby and his/her parent(s). This word is lacking in my dictionary. Google Translate makes it maternity visit, but ...
0
votes
2answers
16k views

What is the different between “what” and “which”?

What is the difference between what and which? For example, what is the difference between the following sentences? What is correct? Which is correct?
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Difference between “Thru” and “Through” [duplicate]

I can't figure out what the difference between thru and through is. I'm working on a text for a website. I described some process and used this sentence: [...] when guiding the user through the ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Present/past perfect when the object is a dead person

I remember (vaguely) reading somewhere that it is wrong to use the present perfect when the subject of a sentence is someone who is long dead: *Einstein has visited the Philippines. My question is,...
1
vote
1answer
94 views

Is “gas” ever used to mean a specific substance that at room temperature is in gaseous form?

In Italian, if I were in a house and said Sento odor di gas. (approximately, "I smell gas."), the person to whom I am speaking would probably go check the stove or the water heater, which is normally ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

“Whom” might be ambiguous

The source is this article (The New Yorker). He has an affectionate but difficult relationship with his girlfriend, Sophina (Melonie Diaz), the mother of his young daughter, whom he adores. To ...
6
votes
5answers
77k views

What is the difference between “Gas” / “Petrol” / “Benzine” / “Gasoline”

I get always confused with that. What am I suppose to use for what and where (US English / UK English?) Example: I need "gas / petrol / benzine / gasoline" for my car.
2
votes
3answers
17k views

Difference between “Wheel” and “ Tires”

I assume that this is one of the US English and UK English differences. Which is the most common phrase: 1) I need new "wheels" for my car. or 2) I need new "tires" for my car.
2
votes
1answer
96 views

Is this 'might have p.p' a back-shifted form?

And Andrew shouted that the sea was coming in, so she leapt splashing through the shallow waves on to the shore and ran up the beach and was carried by her own im-petuosity and her desire for ...
1
vote
2answers
800 views

Is this past tense, in fact, a past perfect

As they turned by the cross roads he thought what an appalling experience he had been through, and he must tell some one –– Mrs. Ramsay of course, for it took his breath away to think what he had ...
2
votes
4answers
4k views

The usage of “from” in “stop somebody from doing something”

stop somebody from doing something Why should we use the preposition "from" here? What is it for? Why not use "stop somebody to do something"? This really confused me.
2
votes
2answers
259 views

Banner Location or Banner Position

I'm preparing a text for the advertise section of the website. The users will be able to post ads and/or rent some banner space. There are several different "spaces" on different pages of the website ...
1
vote
1answer
5k views

Screw with somebody

In a forum thread, someone posted a video of a guy throwing a racoon down the stairs because the racoon was fighting with his dog. A forum user commented: I bet that Raccoon never screws with the ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Usage of “get” and “make”

"This book got me interested in Buddhism." Can I change this sentence to "This book made me interested in Buddhism." "This book got me thinking about my future." Can I change this sentence to "...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Is “scarcely” an intensifier?

That was the country he liked best, over there; those sandhills dwindling away into darkness. One could walk all day without meeting a soul. There was not a house scarcely, not a single village for ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Where is the subject for this to infinitive?

"We wondered who Dumbledore had trusted enough to help him, apart from you." (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) Is there no need to put subject of to help, for example, for them? Is the ...
1
vote
2answers
10k views

When to use “picked up” and when to use “picked out?”

In the following sentence: Mary liked the place she had picked (?). It was an open-air bar with tables and stool surrounding its four sides. Should I use picked up or picked out? And why not just ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

What's the difference between /ɒ/ and /ɑ/?

He nearly swallowed it. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) Jim Dale’s audio Stephen Fry’s audio How does Jim Dale pronounce the a in swallowed: /ɒ/ or /ɑ/? Considering his nationality, it ...
1
vote
2answers
406 views

Is there a word similar to 'multiple' that means 'n-ary' (as in 'unary, binary, ..')?

I want to use one word to say a function takes multiple inputs. Is there a counterpart of 'multiple' in the 'unary, binary, ternary...' family?
2
votes
1answer
131 views

If this 'would' were 'would have p.p', is it not an irrealis but past form of would?

Then she remembered; Paul and Minta and Andrew had not come back. She summoned before her again the little group on the terrace in front of the hall door, standing looking up into the sky. Andrew had ...
3
votes
4answers
39k views

“I am from” or “I come from”?

If someone is asking me about my nationality what is the correct answer? Question :Where are you from? 1. "I am from" 2. "I come from"
3
votes
2answers
24k views

“I will be” or “I'm going to be” [duplicate]

Let's say someone doesn't feel fine at the moment when another person asks how he feels. But he's sure that he should feel better soon - which one is correct: "I will be fine" or "I'm going to ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

Using “visit” in reference to supernatural appearances?

According to Wikipedia, "The Visitation is the visit of Mary with Elizabeth as recorded in the Gospel of Luke , Luke 1:39–56." After reading the above, can one correctly infer that the word "...
3
votes
1answer
378 views

When 'past modal+have+past participle' accompanies with past tense in a sentence, can it be before the past or at the past?

Hermione, however, had more on her mind than the Sorcerer's Stone. She had started drawing up study schedules and colorcoding all her notes. Harry and Ron wouldn't have minded,[A1] but she kept ...
2
votes
3answers
9k views

When is “been” pronounced /biːn/ rather than /bɪn/?

The OALD reports two pronunciations for been, used in British English: /biːn/ /bɪn/ The latter is the same pronunciation reported for North American English. When is been pronounced in a way, ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

When can the present tense be used to express “now”, neither before nor after?

Recently, questions have been asked questions about how, for instance, the past tense can be used to express a future event, or the simple present can be used to express a continuous action or, lastly,...

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