All Questions

-2
votes
2answers
37 views

Charles Dickens bleak house interpretation

It's from Bleak-House. Chapter Down in Lincolnshire ( LXVI) Some of her old friends, principally to be found among the peachy-cheeked charmers with the skeleton throats, did once occasionally say, ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Plural/singular incongruity

I am wondering if we're allowed to use singular and then use plural to refer to the same thing in the same sentence. I am not sure if it's allowed, it's a very rare case, but it's something we may ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

Question about uncountable nouns [on hold]

I just found out what an uncountable noun is (they rarely occur in Portuguese). I found a list of uncountable nouns and I got shocked by how many words don't accept the plural. I still have some ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

“The” or “a” with “that”

From Tom Odell, Another Love: And I'd sing a song that'd be just ours. Shouldn't the article “the” stand in this case? is it explained here that this song will be only ours? And the word "that" ...
2
votes
3answers
57 views

“Break the doubt with certainty”, is there such a phrase?

If I wanted to confront someone, suppose a girl, whom I doubt of doing certain things, but still not sure if she is the one who actually did them. So, I go to her and say: I'm here to overcome my ...
2
votes
2answers
51 views

Why is “bad news seemS” and not “bad news seem”?

In an online English test I found that "bad news seem" is wrong, the correct would be "bad news seems" as in the sentence: Bad news seems to be more attractive than good news. I'm considering ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

Use of in a manner with adjectives

In a manner confuses me in terms of use. Sometimes if i can’t find correct adverb i use adjective before manner . For example is it correct to say: My steel cylinder was delivered in a manner ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Alternative use of the word “otherwise”

Otherwise, apart from its usual meaning, can also indicate "in other respects" (found it in the dictionary). When constructing a sentence using aforementioned meaning of "otherwise" are these ...
1
vote
2answers
26 views

Past continuous

Please help me understand these sentences better: He called while I had been sleeping. Is this correct? And, if it is what, is the difference between that and: He called me while I was ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Some one next door( was playing/has played/had been playing / has been playing ) heavy metal music all night long.I didn't get a wink of sleep

What is the difference between ( was playing and had been playing here ) what is the correct choise ?
0
votes
1answer
26 views

delegate(verb) vs depute (difference in meaning)

The two verbs, delegate and depute seem to be very similar. I am not a native English speaker, though, when I looked carefully at the definitions and example sentences in the dictionary for the two ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Does a pronoun (they) after “and” in a compound predicate sentence necessitate a comma before the “and”?

I have a genuine problem. A compound predicate has one subject and two or more verbs. This is the guideline I am following. Compound Predicate takes no comma when there are two verbs: Michael ...
-2
votes
0answers
35 views

The meaning of the sentence (undercut; putting out) [on hold]

What is the meaning of the following sentence? Cloth manufacturers undercut production by urban craftspeople by putting out work to the villages and farms of the countryside. Edited note: I know ...
1
vote
2answers
40 views

Climb or Climb to

I am so confused about using preposition after certain verbs. What is the difference in meaning between "climb" and "climb to" ? 1-The prisoners climbed the wall and escaped. (Climbed over it) ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

The way “you” can modify a sentence

Shut up you idiot! Shut up idiot! How does "you" affect the meaning of the first clause? Are they both formal ways of addressing?
1
vote
1answer
24 views

How to use specialisation in a sentence

My specialisations are in the German and English languages. My specialisations are the German and English languages. Is "specialisation" here appliable to both of the sentences? Also, Should I ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

amount and duration in one sentence

The present perfect is used for quantity = how much, how many: I have done 100 push-ups. The present perfect continuous is used to express how long something has been happening: I have been doing ...
2
votes
2answers
24 views

Which is the subject of this sentence?

I want to know, how to identify subject and predicate of such long sentence? Talking about our old family holidays has made me feel all nostalgic.
1
vote
1answer
22 views

What is the meaning of “crash out” in this context?

I read a sentence in "The Hindu" which was: A day earlier, a majority of the MPs decided to rule out, under all circumstances, Britain's crashing out of the EU without an agreement. According to ...
5
votes
1answer
861 views

Isn't the word “experience” wrongly used in this context?

Friend: Have you ever flirted with a female cop? Me: Nope. Friend: I have done that experience. I think experience is the wrong word here. What else should he have said?
1
vote
1answer
19 views

What is meant by the phrase “surface supplies”?

I read a sentence in "The Hindu" which was: In the case of water, the imperative is to stop the contamination of surface supplies by chemicals sewage and municipal waste. How should the phrase "...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Using “what + did” in a question

The examples: What killed the Prince of Persia series? What did kill the Prince of Persia series? Is the meaning the same in both questions? Are they both grammatical? Why or why not?
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Can a relativizer be modified by PP phrase

The level of responsibility which the client carries for the whole development process with time & materials is much higher than with fixed-price or milestone projects. It can be understood that ...
1
vote
1answer
11 views

Is it correct to use “the education of a nation's youth”?

In the following sentence, is it correct to use the phrase 'the education of a nation's youth'? is the word 'youth' singular or plural? The education of a nation's youth will shape its future.
1
vote
1answer
17 views

purposeful VS motivated

Let's suppose someone has a goal and they work on achieving that goal. Would it be idiomatic to say: He is purposeful. He is motivated. Do these two phrases mean the same? If they don't, ...
2
votes
2answers
18 views

placement of the participle phrase

And the classy Oxford feeling of nothing mattering except books and poetry and Greek statues, and [nothing worth mentioning having happened since the Goths sacked Rome.] (Coming up for air) The ...
3
votes
1answer
13 views

Is “to reach more” idiomatic?

Let's suppose someone's goal is to get a better job, better salary and so on. Would it be idiomatic for them to say: I want to reach more than I have now.
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Can “turn your collar up” be a natural alternative for “pop your collar”? And “fix” and “turn down.”

Is it natural to say: Why don't you just turn your collar up? Does it sound as natural as "Why don't you just "pop your collar"? And what about "turn down" instead of "fix": Like: Turn your ...
3
votes
3answers
30 views

Difference between 'tips on study' and 'tips at study'?

I am confused between Today i would like to give you tips on study and Today i would like to give you tips at study Can anyone explain which one should i use.
0
votes
2answers
41 views

'over short or long' instead of 'sooner or later'?

Is it permissible to use 'over short or long' instead of 'sooner or later'? On the internet and on Google Books I have only found 'over short or long' as 'over short or long time periods'. I would ...
2
votes
1answer
24 views

Do “usually never” and “usually always” make sense?

When visiting the lunch buffet: "I usually never take the spicy dressing" When waiting for Tom: "Tom usually always comes on time" It seems like a bit of colloquial exaggeration - but is it ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

“a great many processes”

Yet a great many processes depending on such research are sought for with complete secrecy until the stage at which patents can be taken out. (J.D. Bernal "Secrecy in Industry," in L.G. Alexander, New ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Sentence that have a different word usage?

I was recently reading an article where the word "by" was used in a sentence to describe a season (football season) Sentence: The competition is getting tougher by the season. Now, as per my ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Missing and missed [on hold]

What's the difference between your missing friend and your missed friend? What do these two sentences mean? miss: to fail to be or go somewhere If I want to express that my friend has disappeared ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Follow someone down street or down to street

What is the difference in meaning between these examples ? 1-Don't follow women down dark alleys after dark. 2-Don't follow women down to dark alleys after dark. 3-Don't follow women to dark alleys ...
0
votes
3answers
39 views

How to correct this construction “despite still weak results”? I want to fix the word 'still'

Is this sentence correct, and if not, how would you correct it? "Sales are better despite still weak margins"
1
vote
1answer
28 views

“Kick your ass on the road” meaning

I heard "Kick your ass on the road" in a movie. The context is that there were two people in a truck. One guy said it to the driver. From the context, I guess it probably means he had asked the driver ...
0
votes
2answers
19 views

Is the verb *released* incorrectly used with the helping verb did?

Grammarly is correcting me: Actually, I did not released it in a new name because it was supposed for me to take over the maintenance. It is saying I should use release instead of released. Does ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Can you use “inert” as a synonym of “dead”?

I looked up the word "inert", and the definition does not match the definition for "dead", not even the slightest, yet dead is listed as a synonym. What do you think? For example: The coffin of ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

It is correct to write long phrases?

I am a game developer and I am trying to improve my english to increase the quality of the text in my games. I will like to understand what is the "correct" way to write text. Specially the lengh of ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

complex sentences and past sense

I'm discussing internals of a database system with someone and I'm struggling to figure out how do I talk about my past thought on the subject. If I was just expressing my thoughts I would say "It is ...
2
votes
1answer
405 views

Liquor, alcohol or intoxicant [on hold]

There are three words Liquor, Alcohol and Intoxicant. Which word can be used in general for any alcoholic drink? That is, if I say, 'wine' does it present any drink or is it a particular drink?
0
votes
2answers
19 views

Once a week \ Once in a week [on hold]

The dog is given food once a day \ once in a day. We get a day off a week \ in a week. Thank you.
1
vote
2answers
20 views

How to understand the phrase “the unwilling objects of a gruesome sort of reflected fame”

There were relatives of their victims among the Hogwarts students, who now found themselves the unwilling objects of a gruesome sort of reflected fame as they walked the corridors: Susan Bones, whose ...
1
vote
2answers
17 views

Meaning of the phrase “but one” in context

It is from this video. It is at 2 minute and 53 second. You have but one wild and precious life, my friends.
1
vote
1answer
10 views

Sense of the second “were” in this line of When I Survey

I was listening to this the other day and was wondering if this was grammatically correct. Were the whole realm of nature mine... I'm OK with this one; the realm isn't mine and likely never will ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

What do you think has happened with her? [on hold]

Is it a correct sentence: What do you think has happened with her?
0
votes
2answers
19 views

Is that the correct question? (what film was?)

What film was? And the answer is The film was very interesting. Thanks.
1
vote
2answers
26 views

sentence fragment to be improved

I ask the following as a non-native English speaker. In this question, I have trouble understanding how does "accompany me to my office" connect to anything else in the sentence. Original sentence: ...
1
vote
2answers
13 views

“Had complete“, “Had completed”, “Have complete“, Have completed”

what's the difference between these sentence ? He had complete his work. He had completed his work. I have complete my work. I have completed my work. Does it make sense to use present tense after ...

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