All Questions

5
votes
4answers
5k views

What is the word for “practice/habit of giving false hope”?

Like the title says, I want to know what the word/expression for "practice/habit of giving false hope" is. The context is, for example, the owner of a factory who doesn't want to pay his employees. So ...
7
votes
1answer
213 views

Spelling: “number”, “enum(b)erate”, “num(b)erator”, and so on

Why has the English language preserved the letter "b" in the word "number", but not in words like "enumerate" or "numerator" or "numerology" and so on?
4
votes
1answer
103 views

What is the subject in “While nestled inside that divine sanctuary”?

While nestled inside that divine sanctuary, words were my window to the world outside my perch in Columbus, Ohio. (Benita Porter, The Power of Words) It seems like while-clause is a participial ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

How articles work in the expression 'I would like to buy ..'

I am not sure how to use articles in the expression ** I would like to buy**. For e.g. I would like to buy an ipad. I would like to buy a box of chocolates. I would like to buy a can of ...
3
votes
1answer
133 views

equal = being better?

Scalar comparison of equality indicates “at least equal” In the absence of indications to the contrary, a scalar [= ‘clever’ in [i] below] comparison of equality is interpreted as “at least equal”, ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Would you say “Let's head in!”? [closed]

Do we have such expression in English? (I don't remember where I saw it, but I'm sure I did) Let's head in!
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“exempt” usage: adjective or verb

Children are exempt from the charges. Children are exempted from the charges. From these two sentences, the former is an example Longman dictionary provides for the word "exempt". My question is ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Joining multiple questions using the conjunction “or”

I would like to unite these questions into a single uninterrupted expression: Is she okay? Does she need any help? Does she need someone to keep her company? But all the sentences I make ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Converting sentences into question form [duplicate]

I have a sentence and am trying to convert it into a question form. The sentence goes like this: Barack Hussein Obama is the 44th President of the United States. Can anybody please convert it ...
1
vote
1answer
219 views

Why is 'bark someone' improper English?

I read that bark someone isn't proper English, but, even if in a phrasal verb construct, it is used in a sentence from "Six Weeks in Saratoga: How Three-Year-Old Filly Rachel Alexandra Beat the Boy ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Semicolon to connect to related events

She looks above; the bird is coming straight towards her. Is the use of semicolon valid here?
4
votes
1answer
118 views

Can one who lived be the subject of 'leave'?

“I’ve come to bring Harry to his aunt and uncle. They’re the only family he has left now.” -- Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling. OALD says leave somebody is to have family ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

What does “ever” mean in this sentence?

A passion for books and the words inside them saved me from ever knowing a moment’s loneliness during library hours. -- The Power of Words by Benita Porter What do I have to pick up for the ‘...
3
votes
2answers
156 views

Why isn’t there an article?

He turned to the right towards Capel Street. Ignatius Gallaher on the London Press! Who would have thought it possible eight years before? Still, now that he reviewed the past, Little Chandler ...
9
votes
3answers
21k views

How to describe wearing a T-shirt in a opposite manner?

Let's say I put on a T-shirt with back in front and front in back. Is there any word to describe the state of the t-short similar to how upside down means that up and down have been reversed?. The ...
-1
votes
1answer
233 views

What does the term “dream-skinners” mean in this paragraph? [closed]

What does dream-skinners mean? Does it mean the people who cheat others in dream, like the people in the film named "Inception"? In spite of her name (an elegant, whimsical female name which meant ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

When can I omit “that” in a sentence? [duplicate]

E.g. If you thought that we only notice women who grace the covers of prestigious fashion magazines, you’ve been mistaken. or If you thought we only notice women who grace the covers of ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

we'll coming back

"There she is!" said Corley. At the corner of Hume Street a young woman was standing. She wore a blue dress and a white sailor hat. She stood on the curbstone, swinging a sunshade in one hand. ...
0
votes
2answers
561 views

Repeating the subject in a subordinate sentence

Just a short while ago I edited a question published on EL&U(1) and, doing this, I added the following paragraph: The words that express the tangible and visible things of our experience, such ...
3
votes
2answers
8k views

What does “we sent his way” mean in this sentence?

The following paragraph is from "Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2" written by Jeff Kinney. I'm sure our Giving Tree guy will throw his sweater in the trash, along with the ten cans of yams we sent his way ...
3
votes
1answer
170 views

“involved expense” vs “expense involved”

"involved expense" vs "expense involved" If it were not for the expense involved, I would go there by air. Could I use involved expense? "objecting person" vs "person objecting" Any person ...
3
votes
2answers
651 views

plural or singular for “The complete set of”

Is the following grammatical? The complete set of compositional structures that are used in this paper is provided in section 1.
2
votes
3answers
8k views

What does “Slam dunk” mean in this sentence?

What exactly does "slam dunk" mean in this sentence?? Officials Warn Syria Chemical Weapons Intel Is ‘No Slam Dunk’ --- http://world.time.com/2013/08/29/officials-warn-chemical-weapons-intel-...
1
vote
1answer
190 views

What's the meaning of “ be high in indoctrination”?

In Evelyn Waugh's Loved Ones, there is a sentence: Mrs Komstock had...a nephew who was high in indoctrination: Wars simply don’t interest me. Everyone’s like that now. Well, I was like that in ’...
0
votes
2answers
246 views

Distorted Cabin & Oily Sheen: What is going on in this paragraph?

I have been reading a book, and I have a question about the following excerpt: "We're here," The Tortoise in the Lake said, cutting across Dong Huong's gloomy thoughts. "I can see nothing." ...
3
votes
2answers
178 views

What is the word for 'building as a whole'?

Let's say my apartments are in three buildings and they are surrounded by a fence outside; let's say I drop my wallet somewhere inside one of those buildings, so I'll say I dropped wallet somewhere ...
3
votes
1answer
698 views

How to pronounce “I'll say”

When pronouncing the expression "I'll say", on which word I should put the emphasis?
0
votes
1answer
573 views

“Aim life with Money”

I am planning for a tattoo with an image of a target, and the caption I thought of is "Aim life with money". Money being an arrow, and life being the "center of the target". I want to make a point, ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference in pronunciation between “rider” and “writer”?

This question has been split from its original form into two questions. The other half of this question is now here. In the following sentence: Jack London and Charles Dickens were both great ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

'like anything' as an intensifier

I have seen a person using 'like anything' as intensifier. Freedictionary website gave these example of 'like anything':- He ran like anything. (intensifier; usually euphemistic) We worked like ...
2
votes
3answers
457 views

Is the tense-agreement in this question specific to “dare not”, or are there other examples?

He knew she dare not tell her father. Kim daren’t tell them so I had to do it myself. -- The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p109n My mother tongue, Korean, has tense ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “pre-Industrial-Revolution” spelled and hypenated correctly?

I found this quote online: The hackish senses of "engine" are actually close to its original, pre-Industrial-Revolution sense of a skill, clever device, or instrument (the word is cognate to "...
2
votes
2answers
306 views

Is “Has the lad a dog?”correct?

I have read a very short passage from an American textbook which is for elementary school students. Has the lad a dog? The lad has a fat dog. The dog has Nat's cap. Nat and Rab ran. Rab ran ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Is “go to school in” correct?

I have read a passage as following: Most buildings are built for people to live in, work in, or go to school in. But some buildings are built just to hang pictures in. These buildings are called ...
2
votes
1answer
480 views

What is the idiomatic form of the expression 'did you come from upstairs'

Let's say I am in a building with multiple floors, I see my friend in the lobby and I want to ask him Did you come from upstairs? or Are you coming from upstairs (if I know he has just come.) ...
3
votes
1answer
831 views

“Picking my wallet up” or “Picking up my wallet”?

I need some clarification here about the two sentences below. Please explain which one is correct and why. A) Thanks for picking my wallet up. B) Thanks for picking up my wallet.
0
votes
1answer
13k views

How to say 'It's perfect for me'

My owner sent me an email saying "See attachment how the table is displayed." I like how the table is shown, and I want to say "it's nice for me" or "it's perfect for me." What is the correct ...
1
vote
2answers
87 views

Can issues pave the way?

Another phrase-usage question, can you say : These issues pave the way for new opportunities in several markets. and does it sound sexy or weird ?
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “complice”and “accomplice”?

What is the difference between "complice" and "accomplice"? Both means an associate person during some act or something. But what is the difference?
4
votes
1answer
138 views

Can you say “economic agnostic”?

Can you say "economic agnostic" like in the following sentence? Strategy cannot be economic agnostic.
1
vote
1answer
76 views

meaning of infinitives

thankful (to do something) I was thankful to see they'd all arrived safely. thankful (for something) He wasn't badly hurt—that's something to be thankful for. (OALD) I suppose that the first ...
0
votes
1answer
297 views

What should I write instead of “whom he or she wants to participate”?

I have a project and documentation for it. My command writes "[…] whom he or she wants to participate […]." Is it correct to write he or she, or should I write another word, such as user, person, or ...
2
votes
2answers
289 views

Is the word “unsaint” used in English?

Do casual native English speakers understand the word unsaint as the opposite to the word saint? Or do they interpret it as something different or even don't understand it at all?
0
votes
1answer
451 views

What does “focused and narrowed” mean?

What does the highlighted part means? The ground rumbled beneath her, even as her ears popped with pressure –more laughter from The Tortoise in the Lake, even as the darkness of space focused and ...
-1
votes
2answers
316 views

Ears pop with pressure?

What does "even as her ears popped with pressure" mean in the following text? Does it mean her ears will be blown up almost by great pressure? Outside, everything was dark. There was only the ...
1
vote
0answers
98 views

Distorted Cabins & Oily Sheens: What happens really when a low rumble comes? [duplicate]

For this text: There came a low rumble, which distorted the cabin around her, and cast an oily sheen on the walls. Could you tell me that what happened really here as the above text says?In this ...
2
votes
2answers
335 views

Difference between “Human being history” and “Human history”

Is there any difference between “human history” and “human being history”? Are those focus on two different aspects of history? I know that human and human being are interchangeable, but when we ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What does this 'fancy' mean?

If anyone looked out of their window now, even beady-eyed Mrs. Dursley, they wouldn’t be able to see anything that was happening down on the pavement. Dumbledore slipped the Put-Outer back inside ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

When should I use 'its' vs 'their'?

I have a sentence as follows: Architectural analysis is an initial step in defining the system components and their relationships. Can I use "its relationships" instead of "their relationships"?
0
votes
1answer
726 views

Is the use of “scalable” or “scalability” correct in this sentence?

Which of the following is grammatical? How is the scalability of method 1? How scalable is the method 1?

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