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4
votes
1answer
2k views

Can I omit “the” in “the last time” when it introduces a time clause?

Sentence 1a: The Last time I took my pulse, it was a bit fast. Sentence 1b: Last time I took my pulse, it was a bit fast. Sentence 2a: He looked much worried the last time I saw him. Sentence 2b: ...
1
vote
1answer
249 views

Some examples of an inversion

1) Only Larry sleeps under that tree. - a standard word order The right way to rebuild this sentence using the inversion would be 2) Under that tree sleeps only Larry. Now I wonder whether this one ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Is “it” uncalled here or not?

I know that it is OK to say. 1) I don't understand what is written here. but it seems to me that 2) I don't understand what IT is written here. is also OK? Is my guess correct? If yes, how would ...
2
votes
2answers
97 views

Can 'can not' be used for prohibition?

You can’t do that sort of thing. (Random House Unabridged) You can't leave until you finish washing the dishes. (Webster’s Learner’s) When ‘can’ is used for prohibition, does it have to stuck with ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Use of two relative pronouns in the same sentence

Is it OK to say "The guy that helped me, who is 25, is friendly."? The adjective clause in commas can be omitted, so can I include THAT in the subject?
1
vote
1answer
55 views

adjective vs perfect

A lot of students are present at the meeting. A lot of students are presented at the meeting. we can use present as adjective and verb. when I should use adjective form and perfect form ?
0
votes
2answers
81 views

Why using two verbs

A lot of people prefer to eat fried chicken with their fingers. A lot of people prefer eating fried chicken with their fingers A lot of people eat fried chicken with their fingers. ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

“Something is scheduled starting AS OF tomorrow”. Is this the correct usage?

"Something is scheduled starting AS OF tomorrow". Is this the correct usage? I do not like the sound of it. What would a native speaker use in this situation? Thank you.
0
votes
2answers
957 views

Y-axis of a graph with a common unit but different meanings

I have a graph where the x-axis is time and y-axis is the density of two or more different organisms. So the graph shows how the densities change with time. Suppose the species are tunas and whales, ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Which is correct “having committed a crime” or “committing a crime”

Which is correct and why,"The officer is accusing the individual of having committed a crime" or "The officer is accusing the individual of committing a crime"?
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Each base edge and apex “form/forms” a trangle

Each base edge and apex form a triangle. (Wikepedia) When there is the determiner, each, doesn't the subject become singular? I mean the verb, form, needs to be changed to ‘forms’. Is it mistyped or ...
2
votes
2answers
105 views

Could someone tell me the specific grammatical rule governing this phenomenon?

Sentence 1: He wanted to take no risks, however small. Sentence 2: He wanted to take no risks, however small they are. Do the above sentences have the same meaning? Why could we omit "they are" ? ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Adverb EVER to make the sentence clearer?

I have just read this article: http://literalminded.wordpress.com/2014/07/08/open-conditionals-with-the-past-perfect/ I admit that it is quite tricky for an ESL as I am, nonetheless I caught sight ...
-1
votes
1answer
263 views

an ME thrown into the world of electrical engineering - what does ME mean?

Granted, there are many good teachers out there and you might have gotten the basics, but time and too many “status reports” have dulled the finish on your basic knowledge set. If you are like me, ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

What does 'downwind' mean, in relation to humans?

At around the 24 mins and 15 secs of Season 3, Episode 7, of the TV series Strike Back, Lt Col Philip Locke (portrayed by Robson Greene) says: If you do find him, approach from downwind. If he sees ...
4
votes
1answer
400 views

what is the meaning of “minute debris”?

What does "minute debris" mean in the context of an avalanche? I can't find it anywhere. The fragments of ice hit the ground around them. The ground beneath his feet trembled and shifted with the ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

What does “a government vote” mean? [closed]

ACTA bill approved by Japanese government in quick vote The bill despised by internet citizens around the globe, ACTA (Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement), has reared its ugly head once more,...
1
vote
1answer
974 views

What is the meaning of “proceed”?

I read this sentence in the book Revolution 2020: We proceeded to Mughal Sarai to meet a retired chemical professor. In this sentence, it seems like proceeded means "went", but I'm not sure. When ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Can you use specific time with past perfect?

I'm sure that I can say: I had eaten an apple before I went to school. But as the question says, Can I use a specific time? For example: I had eaten an apple in yesterday morning before I went to ...
1
vote
1answer
638 views

“I'll go wherever you **will** go” & “**Wherever** you go, I'll be with you”

Sentence 1: I'll go wherever you will go. Sentence 2: Wherever you go, I'll be with you. Do the above sentences sound natural? Thank you very much
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Why refer to cocaine as “she”?

In Cocaine song, by Clapton, why does he refer to cocaine as "she" instead of "it"? She don't lie, she don't lie, she don't lie, Cocaine In the same sentence, why does he use "don't" instead of "...
0
votes
1answer
11k views

You can choose whichever of the two dates is more convenient for you

Is this sentence "You can choose whichever of the two dates is more convenient for you" accord to rules of grammar? I think there are two predicates. Am I right? Thank you very much!
1
vote
1answer
99 views

In what sense are the words “being down a set” used?

He admits he still has lapses, but being down a set — as he was against Anderson — rarely begets a return to crippling negativity- In addition to the title above, what is the meaning of the sentence?
3
votes
2answers
996 views

What does “basic” mean? [closed]

What does "basic" in the dialogue below mean? A: "Some version of the Golden Rule can be found in every culture in the world. It's universal." B: "I guess it really is that basic."
4
votes
1answer
2k views

The plural of letters

I realise the first concatenation of the 's and it's example. Second one which says double p or double l.So I couldn't understand that.Please help me to describe that with some example. 1, The plural ...
2
votes
1answer
275 views

Would you please tell me if it was said vs. it said are the same?

In the book it said: "The Boa swallows its prey". In the book it was said :" The Boa swallows its prey". Would you tell me if these are correct? And is there any difference between them?
2
votes
1answer
38 views

In comparison construction, can 'that' be recovered as in relative clause?

[i] This is the watch (that) I lost. [ii] This is the same watch as (that) I lost. It is said accusative relative words can be dropped as in [i]. CGEL saying there are omissions in adjuncts of ...
2
votes
1answer
780 views

What the author is trying to say in this paragraph?

Consider the following paragraph: The possibility that such rents were important is, I think, reinforced by many of the institutional features of the colonial era: the carving up of the Third World ...
3
votes
1answer
238 views

Depending on size of the calculator's display - why no article in front of “size”?

An excerpt from Pi: A Biography of the World's Most Mysterious Number: The theme of this book is understanding π and some of its most beautiful aspects. So we should begin out discussion and ...
-1
votes
2answers
178 views

On The Way, In The Way

For these two sentences: They discussed the law in the way in which it affects people. They discussed the law on the way in which it affects people. Could "in the way" and "on the way" be ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

What does “to take someone back” mean?

I read that someone was advised to do the following regarding that person’s ex: Get her to take you back. What does that mean?
1
vote
1answer
16k views

Best answer for “feel free to …” [closed]

When people say "feel free to contact me", I don't know how to answer. How do you reply this? Thanks
2
votes
0answers
937 views

“Subjective complement and objective complement” [closed]

What is the difference between "subjective complement" and "objective complement"? How can I recognize them in the sentences? Is there any special rule for them? Do they use after special verbs? If ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

a substantial bandwidth savings - an indefinite article preceding a plural noun

The code used to produce graphics on the client side is typically much smaller than the images themselves, creating a substantial bandwidth savings. Is there any explanation as to why indefinite ...
4
votes
3answers
160 views

Confusing word order of “more a lowering of some positions…”

Consider: “It was a risk-off shift in the last three days,” Benno Galliker, a trader at Luzerner Kantonalbank AG in Lucerne, Switzerland, said. “It’s probably more a lowering of some positions ...
5
votes
2answers
704 views

A fantastic excerpt for learning the usage of prepositions

German inflation slowed this month, adding to signs that the European Central Bank’s unprecedented stimulus for the euro area has yet to have any significant effect on the currency region’s prices. ...
2
votes
3answers
833 views

How could one 'sit on the hearth'?

From Dickens: Dear reader! It rests with you and me, whether, in our two fields of action, similar things shall be or not. Let them be! We shall sit with lighter bosoms on the hearth, to see the ...
3
votes
1answer
292 views

Is there any difference between these two sentences?

In what form should I put nonstative verbs with "when"? E.g., (1) You have to be careful when you cut a cake. (2) You have to be careful when you are cutting a cake. Is there a difference ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

“It was a time of heroes and villains, of battles and castles, intrigue and cunning.”

There is in the website http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/education/as/warsofindependence/index.shtml this sentence "It was a time of heroes and villains, of battles and castles, intrigue and cunning." ...
1
vote
1answer
223 views

What does “There are always people who love to sweat” mean in this context?

I was reading a review on Amazon which said the following: To sum up, this method works fine for me and I can recommend it wholeheartedly. But then again, there are always people who love to sweat.....
3
votes
1answer
794 views

“Plays no games” vs. “doesn't play games” or “Says no words” vs. “Doesn't say words”

I wonder if there is a grammatical or stylistic difference between these contexts : He plays no games. vs. He doesn't play games. He says no words. vs. He doesn't say words.
3
votes
4answers
4k views

She's a twin to her brother? Is it correct?

There are two questions, quite similar. I know the word twin which means one of the twins. Now, while introducing a girl to my friend, I want to say, "she's a twin" but in this sentence only, I want ...
4
votes
1answer
98 views

“Networks must maintain data on 'its' users…” Grammatical mistake by BBC News?

Has BBC News made a mistake in this article? It includes measures to ensure that bloggers cannot remain anonymous, and states that social networks must maintain six months of data on its users. ...
1
vote
2answers
12k views

Similar ways of saying “You understand me?” and “You hear me?” [closed]

What are some alternative ways of saying “You understand me?” and “You hear me?” as a rhetorical question that we say when we are angry and pissed. Because sometimes these expressions look overly used....
3
votes
2answers
8k views

“provide” vs. “provide for”

What are the similarities and differences? In the example below, what would be the difference between using “provide for” and (just) “provide”? provide: Make available for use; supply ...
4
votes
4answers
837 views

Do I need “a/an” or “the” in this sentence?

Suppose that I have submitted a job application. And now I am waiting for the result. Do I say "I am waiting for an answer from the company" or "I am waiting for the answer from the ...
2
votes
2answers
138 views

What does this 'that' mean?

Optional depictive predicatives as adjuncts Obligatory predicatives are clearly complements, dependent on the occurrence of an appropriate verb. With optional ones, however, there are grounds ...
3
votes
1answer
216 views

What does “all of six months” mean?

—Source A: What are your memories of the U. S. - Soviet Union game in 1980, Seth? ;-) B: I was all of six months old that day. ;) Does he mean he's exactly six months old that day?
1
vote
1answer
131 views

What does “ethnic X”, where X is the people of a country, mean?

In http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-pacific-15263826 there is the phrase "ethnic Russian". Will you please tell me what does it mean? (I know what the word "ethnic" means)
3
votes
2answers
81 views

Is *a* optional after *both*?

This is a quote from a book: Leibniz was both philosopher and mathematician. To me it should be "both a philosopher and (a) mathematician." Is the article a optionall after both? Does both ...

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