All Questions

0
votes
0answers
4 views

Is “helping advise” grammatically correct?

These could be helping advise a local company or receiving a gift. As I know, "to" doesn't need to be used for "help". But "helping advise" seems a bit odd. Does it mean "helping a local company by ...
0
votes
0answers
6 views

What does my elbow are “in” mean?

Youtube video: Time: 2:32 (my elbow are in) What does "elbows in" and "elbows out" mean? Elbows in vs. out Why I couldn't find in the dictionary? Is this a short form?
0
votes
0answers
6 views

haven't **gone** to a restaurant?

I am wondering if the following is grammatical and idiomatic. I really love the restaurant but haven't **gone** in a while. Is the word 'gone' used correctly here?
0
votes
0answers
6 views

Are the following similes restrictive or not non-restrictive?

I'm pretty sure the similes in these sentences are non-restrictive (they can be removed without modifying the meaning of the previous sentence). And therefore, they should be preceded by a comma. ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Is it correct to use “am” in a sentence without “I”?

I am noticing the trend of people using to be (am) without the subject (I). For example: Guys, am deciding to move away from Photoshop. Can you advise other apps as alternative? Is this ...
-1
votes
0answers
14 views

Every why has a wherefore

Is there such a proverb "Every why has a wherefore" in current English? Does it sound natural to you? If it exists, then what is its precise meaning? Also, I wonder if you could provide me with some ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

“Keep something” vs “stand by something”

I have heard both of the sentences below in quite similar cases. I wonder if you could let me know how can I distinguish between them and how they differ in meaning? do they mean the same thing? 1) ...
0
votes
1answer
10 views

What does “for relocation benefits” mean?

We will provide you $1,000, which you may use to cover expenses occurring as a result from your move, or for relocation benefits. In this sentence, does the bold part mean: You may use this ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

“Put something into action” versus “put something into practice”

How do the following sentences differ in meaning: Put your promise into action. Put your promise into practice. Dictionaries' definitions are so close that I cannot tell these expressions ...
0
votes
0answers
5 views

What does negotiate mean here?

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/negotiate People in organizations spend much of their time engaged in such endeavors. To justify their toil, they want to believe that their ...
0
votes
1answer
10 views

what the author want to say?

I was reading a book, but when I reached this statement, I could not continue to do that because I did not understand it. Please tell me what the author want to say in this statement: For a short ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

What does “with input” mean?

We expect you to do great things with your work here. When that happens is up to you (with input from your manager, of course). What does "with input from your manager, of course" mean? Does it ...
1
vote
2answers
13 views

“Below” and “down” preposition confusion in this context

While filling in a form on Net: Down / below / down below the entries you will see a submit sign. Down usually means: towards a lower position. And, Below usually means: at a lower position. So ...
1
vote
1answer
10 views

What does “then because of” mean?

If you feel you need to work overtime, then because of your position or salary level, you won’t be paid additional overtime. What does "then because of" mean? I searched dictionaries, but couldn't ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

“Will you be free” vs “Are you free”

I want to hang out with my friend on Sunday (or some other time), what is the correct way to ask him about his ability to do it? a)"Are you free on Sunday?" or b)"Will you be free on Sunday?" I can ...
0
votes
1answer
12 views

“Practicable” versus “Feasible”

For me, and based on dictionaries, both of the words "practicable" and "feasible" mean the same thing. I wonder if I'm mistaken, provide me with some examples where one of them is preferred over the ...
1
vote
2answers
17 views

could you tell me what kind of sentence this is??i mean grammatically

What Kevin told you about himself wasn't true if what is a subject, what about Kevin?? I want to know there is a grammar for this sentence?? if there is what do we call it??
0
votes
0answers
14 views

“What” root or“ Which” root?

I read a sentence in "Word Power Made Easy" which was: In the etymology section, you will learn what Greek or Latin root give the word its unique meaning and what other words contain the same or ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Meaning of “as of” in this context

A fragment from a news article: While sharing jokes and memes on social media sites by these renowned personalities is completely fine, there is always a limit to as of what is considered to be ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

What form or what do you call adjectives that are “somewhat” of something?

Soz, not a native speaker. Let say, reddish, it means somewhat red. English has superlative and comparative forms, is their a name to an -ish adjective or somewhat + adjective?
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Need help with this English please [on hold]

Can someone correct these for me please? “I was you waiting for the bus” is correct, how about “I saw you injuring in the car crash” means, I witnessed you getting injured am I correct? I wonder ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

What is this sentence supposed to mean?

I read a sentence in "Word Power Made Easy" which was: Believe me the old saw that claims you cannot teach an old dog new tricks is a baseless, if popular, superstition. Does the "if popular" ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

definitional clarity: the university of life

The following is taken from Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. What does "the person gaining formal qualifications" stand in opposition to? Is the definition considered clear by the standards of ...
0
votes
1answer
12 views

ration “comparing to” instead of “to”

Is the sentence below correct? It is calculated as the ratio of real errors comparing to all detected errors.
0
votes
1answer
17 views

What's the right sequence?

Does it make sense if I say: This is the right order of the person to contact"? I'm translating a document about a matrix escalation, which allows you to specify multiple user contacts to be ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

“Should had” usage in a sentence

Can I say following sentence? If no, what’s the best alternative. Thanks I should had gone but I didn’t.
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Someone who lends usurious money and their action

What do you call a person who achieves lots of money without working, just sitting at home lending people money with the agreement that they will pay him/her back a very much larger amount of money in ...
0
votes
2answers
24 views

“Who is it?” Vs. “Who is he?”

In many situation such as: A) If friend tells you about someone else that it's not clear to you who is the person that your friend talks about. B) Someone calls you and you do not know who is this ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Is the phrase “I wish I would not” grammatical in the given sentence?

In Wish and If only, I learned that; NB We can only use wish + would to talk about things we can’t change. So I wish I wouldn’t eat so much chocolate. is not possible although we can say I wish I ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Need help with these issues

"I saw you waited for the bus" (wrong unless add that) "I saw that you waited for the bus" (correct) "I saw a house destroyed on the road" (wrong unless add that) "I saw that a house destroyed on the ...
0
votes
2answers
16 views

Using the word “profiteer” in noun and verbal form

What verb do you usually use to describe the action of a "profiteer"? I know that the word "profiteer" can be used in both noun and verbal forms, but I think that the verbal form is used very rarely. ...
0
votes
1answer
8 views

Usage of the word 'TOGGLE'

The word 'toggle' itslef means switching between two states. But is it proper to use explicitly like 'toggle ON' or 'toggle OFF' ? How the usage for that word should happen?
0
votes
2answers
16 views

When you're going to discover the amount of someone's financial loss

Let's suppose you have lost a specific amount of money in a deal and your partner is going to find out how much it had been. What shall he ask you? Once, I had a close American friend who had ...
0
votes
1answer
7 views

Difference between “several” and “several of”

I stumbled upon this while reading a detective novel An Innocent Client by Scott Prat. Below is the phrase in context. Landers ate lunch there two or three times a month. Even now and then he'd ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

When you're going to know about your cut in a deal

Please imagine a dealer is going to make a deal happen between two people. He tends to know what cut he would get out of this dealing. In our language the dealer can say: 1- What's in it for me? ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

see something done/ see something being done

As far as I know, we use "see something do" if we see an action from the beginning to the end. And we use "see something doing" if we see an action in progress. I wonder about passive form of this ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Used to vs would structural difference

I have a doubt on the following question. Fill Up the gap 1) I ______________ want to be a practising doctor but now I'm more interested in research. Options: A. was used to B. used to c. would I ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Is this an example of a gerund or a participle?

this is my first time asking a question in ELL, so I am sorry if I broke any rules. In the following sentence, is tapping a gerund or a participle? His tapping finger on the change mat speeded up ...
1
vote
1answer
15 views

Correct usage of want

One of the meanings of want is to lack something But I am confued regarding its use in a sentence. Which of the following sentence is correct? He doesn't want courage. He doesn't want in ...
1
vote
1answer
14 views

When he married, he {could / was able to} go to Europe

I'm not a native-speaker, so sometimes modal verbs are tricky for me. Could is a modal verb that expresses general ability in the past tense. 'Was able to' is not a modal verb, and we can use 'was ...
2
votes
3answers
24 views

Is there a verb that means “put it out there for everyone to see”?

Is there a verb that means "put it out there for everyone to see"? What brought this about is the fact I wondered how to describe the scene where the police of Gotham city flashes the bat-signal on ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Why do people prefer using “will be doing” form(future continuous) when they can use just “will do”(simple future)?

I get confused several times, especially in speaking English, when I hear more and more native English speaker prefer to use "be doing" form. When I attend a class the instructor may say "We will be ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

From / By a different method

I need to send an email to my manager saying I got some details from an insurance using a different method other than calling them. But I wasn't sure which is correct from below sentences. I managed ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

“Appeal from a decision”

This sentence from a wiki page of a court case grates. I have always seen/heard appeal a decision or appeal against a ruling. What does appeal from mean? Tiffany appealed from these decisions to ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Talking about the temperature

Is it correct this? : Today is 25°C Or this: Today it’s 25°C And without today: Is 25°C/ It’s 25°C
2
votes
4answers
261 views

Is there an idiom that means “accepting a bad business deal out of desperation”?

Is there an idiom that means "accepting a bad business deal out of desperation"? If you can't think of something that means exactly that, can you think of an idiom that means "accepting less than you ...
2
votes
1answer
34 views

What would you say when you are not a beneficiary in a matter?

Please imagine that you have introduced a buyer and a seller to each other (both of them are your friends, but they have not been familiar with each other so far.) The two people have been connected ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Does “tear at it” means “damaging it to the point small pieces are torn off”?

Does "tear at it" means "damaging it to the point small pieces are torn off"? I am asking the question, because I feel "tear at it" cannot be used to mean that "X had pieces torn off of it". Here's ...
1
vote
1answer
15 views

When someone is just looking for his/her own profit/benefit

What shall I say in natural English to convey that someone is just looking for his own benefit/profit in everything (i.e. business, personal relationships, social connections etc.) The term which can ...
1
vote
1answer
14 views

Present tense or Will

The person who wins gets the prize The person who wins will get the prize The person who will win gets the prize The person who will win will get the prize Which of the above are ...

15 30 50 per page