All Questions

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0answers
2 views

Selecting vs selecting for

See in this sense refers to selecting for variants that do reproductively useful things. What does for function here in this sentence. As far as i am concerned, we can use for when the word “...
0
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1answer
5 views

“what she said” VS “her saying”

We were all very disappointed about what she said. We were all very disappointed about her saying that. What's the differences?
1
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1answer
6 views

Usage of “cause” in “Impeachment does not even require probable cause that a crime has been committed.”

Is the use of cause within this context correct?: Impeachment does not even require probable cause that a crime has been committed. I've looked through many dictionaries and none of them did ...
1
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1answer
4 views

Is there an idiom that suggest you're giving an ultimatum to someone?

Is there an idiom that suggest you're giving an ultimatum to someone? Like something similar to "do this or you die!" although I don't think an idiom that use such strong language exist. Is there any ...
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0answers
4 views

Is there an idiom that means “offering little resistance” as in a negotiation, physical fight, war?

I am looking for an idiom that means "offering little resistance" in a very general way such that it can be used in the context of a negotiation, physical fight or even war. Is there such an idiom? If ...
0
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0answers
6 views

Is it incorrect to end a sentence with a question mark (?) when it starts with a participle?

Is it incorrect to end a sentence with a question mark (?) when it starts with a participle? I am wondering if it's the case, you would think it's the case, because you can't start a question with a ...
0
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0answers
6 views

Need clarify with this grammar

Can someone clarify this for me please, “I saw you close or closing the door“ I saw the action as I was walking past “I saw that, you closed the door this morning” Now is afternoon Many thanks
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0answers
9 views

are these both sentences have an identical meaning? or each has its own emphasis? “tomorrow is his birthday” “it's his birthday tomorrow”?

There are 2 sentences have similar (may be identical) meanings. sentence_1: "tomorrow is his birthday" sentence_2: "it's his birthday tomorrow" are these both sentences have an identical meaning? ...
0
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1answer
14 views

What does it refer to in the context?

The original text: [...] For them the working hours are never long enough. Each day is a holiday, and ordinary holidays, when they come, are grudged as enforced interruptions in an absorbing ...
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0answers
7 views

Using “being” with past participle phrases

I almost never see using "being" in past participle phrases, even though those participle phrase express something progressing. 1- For nigh on half a year, they had lived in the magister’s house, ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

Accounting Terminology

I would like to know how to say something related to accounting in English. I have to show the totals of a current account in the following way: Totals: Below all, show the total Credit, Debit and ...
0
votes
1answer
8 views

An adjective for a method or a way of doing things that does not take unnecessary time or doesn't waste time?

I am looking for an adjective for a method or a way of doing things that does not take unnecessary time or doesn't waste time? Example: This journal has reviewed my paper without taking ...
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0answers
7 views

Do we need to put “and” right before “primarily from property taxes”?

There is another area of inequality in the American education system. Because of the way that schools are funded, the quality of education that American students receive in public schools varies ...
-1
votes
1answer
24 views

Word choice for “Educationally Enriched”

Is there any word which replace the phrase "Educationally enriched"? I was trying to write an essay where I defined a state where every people are educated. To define that I was taking help of phrase ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

The meeting could not take place as originally planned and we agreed to a new date, two weeks later [on hold]

The meeting could not take place as originally planned and we agreed to a new date, two weeks later Which statements are true? 1) The meeting was cancelled. 2) The meeting was delayed. 3) The ...
1
vote
3answers
36 views

What is the grammatical function of the bold phrase in the sentence?

Some of the world's oldest preserved art is the cave art of Europe, most of it in Spain and France. The above sentence is from IELTS test reading passage, and it is oral English. I want to make ...
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0answers
28 views

Acute and chronic are sub-classification of what?

We can classify a disease for example according to the severity (mild, intermediate, and severe) or according to the stability (stable and non-stable) and so on. According to what we determine acute ...
0
votes
2answers
32 views

Infinitive as adverbial modifier of purpose

I read this sentence in the Barron's practice exercises book (you should choose the incorrect usage): The understanding (a) electricity (b) depends (c) on a knowledge of atoms and the subatomic ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

I do not eat fast food

I do not eat fast food. I don't eat fast food. What is the difference between them? In everyday speech, we use #2. Can't we use #2 in a formal writing at all? When we say #1, what is the difference ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Bun up your hair vs Put your hair up in a bun?

Earlier this morning I was talking to a friend about something she wanted to do with her hair. I asked her "Are you going to bun your hair up?" and she said "bun up? I've never heard that before". She ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

'At a glance, at a touch' - Is it weird if I use this expression?

I've seen that 'at a glance' is a quite widely used in many texts. However, it refers to eye or optical something whatsoever. - Sorry, I'm not a native speaker ;(. I'd like to apply it to touch ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

What does my elbow are “in” mean?

Youtube video: Time: 2:32 (my elbow are in) What does "elbows in" and "elbows out" mean? Elbows in vs. out Why I couldn't find in the dictionary? Is this a short form?
0
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1answer
28 views

“haven't gone to a restaurant”—is “gone” used correctly?

I am wondering if the following is grammatical and idiomatic. I really love the restaurant but haven't gone in a while. Is the word 'gone' used correctly here?
0
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0answers
17 views

Are the following similes restrictive or non-restrictive?

I'm pretty sure the similes in these sentences are non-restrictive (they can be removed without modifying the meaning of the previous sentence). And therefore, they should be preceded by a comma. ...
0
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0answers
27 views

Is it correct to use “am” in a sentence without “I”?

I am noticing the trend of people using to be (am) without the subject (I). For example: Guys, am deciding to move away from Photoshop. Can you advise other apps as alternative? Is this ...
-1
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0answers
18 views

Every why has a wherefore

Is there such a proverb "Every why has a wherefore" in current English? Does it sound natural to you? If it exists, then what is its precise meaning? Also, I wonder if you could provide me with some ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

“Keep something” vs “stand by something”

I have heard both of the sentences below in quite similar cases. I wonder if you could let me know how can I distinguish between them and how they differ in meaning? do they mean the same thing? 1) ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

What does “for relocation benefits” mean?

We will provide you $1,000, which you may use to cover expenses occurring as a result from your move, or for relocation benefits. In this sentence, does the bold part mean: You may use this ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

“Put something into action” versus “put something into practice”

How do the following sentences differ in meaning: Put your promise into action. Put your promise into practice. Dictionaries' definitions are so close that I cannot tell these expressions ...
0
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0answers
8 views

What does negotiate mean here?

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/negotiate People in organizations spend much of their time engaged in such endeavors. To justify their toil, they want to believe that their ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

what the author want to say?

I was reading a book, but when I reached this statement, I could not continue to do that because I did not understand it. Please tell me what the author want to say in this statement: For a short ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

What does “with input” mean?

We expect you to do great things with your work here. When that happens is up to you (with input from your manager, of course). What does "with input from your manager, of course" mean? Does it ...
1
vote
2answers
16 views

“Below” and “down” preposition confusion in this context

While filling in a form on Net: Down / below / down below the entries you will see a submit sign. Down usually means: towards a lower position. And, Below usually means: at a lower position. So ...
1
vote
1answer
14 views

What does “then because of” mean?

If you feel you need to work overtime, then because of your position or salary level, you won’t be paid additional overtime. What does "then because of" mean? I searched dictionaries, but couldn't ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

“Will you be free” vs “Are you free”

I want to hang out with my friend on Sunday (or some other time), what is the correct way to ask him about his ability to do it? a)"Are you free on Sunday?" or b)"Will you be free on Sunday?" I can ...
1
vote
2answers
22 views

“Practicable” versus “Feasible”

For me, and based on dictionaries, both of the words "practicable" and "feasible" mean the same thing. I wonder if I'm mistaken, provide me with some examples where one of them is preferred over the ...
1
vote
2answers
23 views

could you tell me what kind of sentence this is??i mean grammatically

What Kevin told you about himself wasn't true if what is a subject, what about Kevin?? I want to know there is a grammar for this sentence?? if there is what do we call it??
0
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0answers
15 views

“What” root or“ Which” root?

I read a sentence in "Word Power Made Easy" which was: In the etymology section, you will learn what Greek or Latin root give the word its unique meaning and what other words contain the same or ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Meaning of “as of” in this context

A fragment from a news article: While sharing jokes and memes on social media sites by these renowned personalities is completely fine, there is always a limit to as of what is considered to be ...
0
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0answers
13 views

What form or what do you call adjectives that are “somewhat” of something? [on hold]

Soz, not a native speaker. Let say, reddish, it means somewhat red. English has superlative and comparative forms, is their a name to an -ish adjective or somewhat + adjective?
0
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0answers
11 views

Need help with this English please [on hold]

Can someone correct these for me please? “I was you waiting for the bus” is correct, how about “I saw you injuring in the car crash” means, I witnessed you getting injured am I correct? I wonder ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What is this sentence supposed to mean?

I read a sentence in "Word Power Made Easy" which was: Believe me the old saw that claims you cannot teach an old dog new tricks is a baseless, if popular, superstition. Does the "if popular" ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

definitional clarity: the university of life

The following is taken from Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. What does "the person gaining formal qualifications" stand in opposition to? Is the definition considered clear by the standards of ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

ration “comparing to” instead of “to”

Is the sentence below correct? It is calculated as the ratio of real errors comparing to all detected errors.
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What's the right sequence?

Does it make sense if I say: This is the right order of the person to contact"? I'm translating a document about a matrix escalation, which allows you to specify multiple user contacts to be ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

Which one grammatically right: [on hold]

When I was ten, my grandfather (had \ was having ) his 60th birthday party. ?
0
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1answer
16 views

“Should had” usage in a sentence

Can I say following sentence? If no, what’s the best alternative. Thanks I should had gone but I didn’t.
0
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1answer
16 views

Someone who lends usurious money and their action

What do you call a person who achieves lots of money without working, just sitting at home lending people money with the agreement that they will pay him/her back a very much larger amount of money in ...
0
votes
2answers
27 views

“Who is it?” Vs. “Who is he?”

In many situation such as: A) If friend tells you about someone else that it's not clear to you who is the person that your friend talks about. B) Someone calls you and you do not know who is this ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Is the phrase “I wish I would not” grammatical in the given sentence?

In Wish and If only, I learned that; NB We can only use wish + would to talk about things we can’t change. So I wish I wouldn’t eat so much chocolate. is not possible although we can say I wish I ...

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