All Questions

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0answers
3 views

Using noun as verb

A lot of times, native speakers use proper nouns like movie names, fictional characters as the verb while speaking. I have heard these statements in a lot of movies and youtube videos. I will give an ...
1
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1answer
6 views

What do you call the apparatus you use to raise a flag?

What do you call the apparatus you use to raise a flag? Here we see a dummy person raising the flag with an apparatus, what is the apparatus called? Is there a word for it?
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0answers
3 views

Using the phrasal verb “hold up” for an individual appearance

When something holds up it means that it has remained strong or in a fairly good condition. For example: There were fears that her ankle might not hold up for the competition. Prices had held ...
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0answers
3 views

What does flower removal plots mean?

I was reading "The impact of an alien plant on a native plant-pollinator network: an experimental approach" and it talks about flower removal plots what does that mean? My English is not good and I am ...
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0answers
3 views

What is the difference between “suspicious” and “suspected”?

For example, suspected malfunction Is it ok to interpret "suspected" as "suspicious"?
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0answers
7 views

Is there an idiom for saying that X is worrying you?

Is there an idiom for saying that X is worrying you? I am looking for an idiom that means that an idea is worrying you, but if there's no such idiom I would like to have a phrase with a phrasal verb.
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0answers
6 views

A modern substitue for “kith and kin”

In old-fashioned English, the term "kith and kin" encompass all the people you've been connected with, including the nuclear and extended family members. What is its modern substitute if exists? ...
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0answers
4 views

Usage/understanding of “holding it all”?

In the Off Camera Show (timestamp), Brit Marling says today many people take many photos a day as a way to say I'm here, I'm alive and I'm holding it all. Is this a way to express someone has ...
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0answers
8 views

Could I write “best answered questions”?

Good time of the day! I am checking math HWs and I want to grade each HW in following way: assume that there are 10 questions and a student got 8 points for the first question, 9 for the second, 10 ...
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0answers
11 views

Maternal and paternal (aunt/uncle)

How should I define the type of my aunt and uncle in order to specify among my parents, whose brother or sister they are? Is it the natural way of it to precede these nouns with the adjectives "...
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0answers
4 views

“have pain in something” or “have a pain in something”?

Tell me please which one of the folowing sentences is correct. Because I have pain in my arm, I cannot pull it. Because I have a pain in my arm, I cannot pull it.
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0answers
2 views

interpreting the meaning of the paragraph

Mr. Wasserman also saw an opportunity to gain advantage from the refusal of the major film studios to license their movies for television. In 1957, he paid $50 million for Paramount Pictures' pre-1948 ...
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0answers
10 views

in British English, he failed in exam or he failed exam

Which one sounds wrong in written British English? He failed mathematics exam. He failed in his mathematics exam. He failed in the mathematics exam.
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0answers
8 views

What is meant by “resource base” in this sentence?

I read a sentence in a chapter in my book which was: The emphasis on developing a resource base also meant that export-oriented growth was limited. I googled the for the term "resource view". But ...
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1answer
9 views

Shouldn't we need to put “not” before “because” to make the structure take “..not…but rather” form?

I am confusing. I guess the author want to express the contrast by using ...not...but rather structure. to negate the forepart proposition, should not we have to insert the "not" to make that part ...
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1answer
14 views

Usuing the term “half/full blood” in current English

Edited: I need to know in a casual or formal occasion, would it be possible to introduce the type of a relation between your half-sister or half-brother an you as below: 1- We are half-blooded. ...
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1answer
12 views

Can we use the format “must be happened”?

Can we use these sentences like 1. Solar eclipse 'must be happened' today. 2. If that happens then it 'must be occurred' at east. Are they correct ones 'must be happened' and 'must be occurred'? Or ...
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0answers
5 views

Can “a gerund noun phrase” be used as a secondary verb of the verb “save”?

Jesus saves sinners going to hell I think here "save" seems used as a ditransitive verb taking two objects "sinners" and "going to hell", so this sentence can be transformed into "Jesus saves going ...
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1answer
10 views

Is grace in the following sentence from Cosmos a noun or a verb?

dThere seemed to be no way in which atoms and molecules could somehow spontaneously fall together to create organisms of such awesome complexity and subtle functioning as grace every region of the ...
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1answer
9 views

A place composed of many nations and races

What do you call humorously or in casual English a country / city which is comprised of many races from various provinces of the same country or other countries? Is there any specific term, expression ...
-2
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0answers
20 views

Does this 'but' indicate a contrast

The original: The Algerian landing had been viewed with mixed feelings in a politically divided France, but there does not seem to have been, any marked indication on the part of the ...
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0answers
13 views

How to change the word 'Absent' from direct to indirect narration in the following sentence?

She said to him' "Why were you absent yesterday ?" Is it ok to write it as' She asked him why he had been absent the previous day'.
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0answers
12 views

A metaphor which can introduce an experienced/inexperienced person

What do you call a half-baked (not quite experienced) and well-baked (well-experienced) person in English? I'm looking for a metaphorical expression or preferably word, which can explain a person who ...
0
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1answer
8 views

Where did you go and lose your watch? VS Where did you go and lost your watch?

Where did you go and lose your watch? Where did you go and lost your watch? I think the first one is grammatically correct because one auxiliary is enough for both, but I'm not sure! Any idea?
-1
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0answers
13 views

At the age of … years old

Please let me know which one of the made-up sentences below doesn't have a correct structure? (To me they all work) 1) I reached maturity at X. 2) I reached maturity at the age of X. 3) I ...
-1
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0answers
12 views

When a young person sexually reaches the age of maturity

What do you normally say when a young person sexually reaches their maturity? 1) He has reached his maturity. 2) He has reached his sexual maturity. 3) He has reached his puberty. Based on ...
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0answers
5 views

Run out of (singular) or (plural)

Let's say you still enough stock of something. And you say: I still have enough stock, I'm not going run out of nail. Or I still have enough stock, I'm not going run out of nails. Should it be ...
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0answers
6 views

“for situation” or “in situation”?

I am learning this doc, which says For 8-bit (bytes) patterns: Matches any decimal digit; this is equivalent to [0-9]. i would like to express the similar meaning by saying a is equivalent to ...
0
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1answer
12 views

What does “point blank” mean in the context?

The original sentence: This tradition of guaranteeing anonymity began to develop quickly, although it was not until later that it was carried to the extreme of denying all knowledge of any ...
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0answers
10 views

What does MO'MAGA BLUES mean?

I see it in an article on the site The Daily Beast.It's the title.I only know the meaning of MAGA. MO’ MAGA BLUES You Think It’s Bad Now? Wait for Next Year’s Show Trials I have found ...
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0answers
7 views

In past tense which is write 'I make them write or I made them write?'

In past tense which is write 'I make them write or I made them
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0answers
6 views

In the very front row at the theater/ of the theater

Is it okay to say in the very first row at the theater or of the theater? If both are possible, what is the difference between those two? Thanks in advance!
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0answers
10 views

is it correct to use the adverb “possibly” this way in a sentence?

Is it right to say: These are the possibly required files by the dean. I mean the use of "possibly" here: is it correct?
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0answers
15 views

Meaning of “docketed for requisition”

From A History of Warfare by John Keegan, page 22: The regimental depots bulged with spare weapons and uniforms to kit the reservists out; even the horses in the farmers' fields were docketed for ...
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0answers
11 views
5
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1answer
60 views

idiomatic way to describe an action, in which a main theme for a string of many similar subsequent actions was established

What's the idiomatic way to describe an action, in which a main theme for a string of many similar subsequent actions was established? On the very first lesson he told me that his hobby was ...
1
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1answer
21 views

A phrase to say to show your respect to someone/something when they died/broken

I'm looking for phrases/ways of saying to show your respect when someone died or something broken, specifically when they did a great job. It could be used for inanimate object, for example a man can ...
-1
votes
1answer
16 views

Using “if” in this context

A sentence in Cambridge Dictionary: He is deluding himself if he thinks he is going to be promoted this year. I'm not able to understand the meaning properly. I'm aware of the uses of if and ...
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2answers
15 views

The difference in the meaning of the two mentioned sentences?

That is an actually sufficient account. That is actually a sufficient account. What is the difference in the meaning of 1 and 2? Are both 1 and 2 correct gramatically? If both mean the same, ...
0
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1answer
15 views

Is there an idiom that means that something fell in value?

Is there an idiom that means that something fell in value? Like monetary value? It can also be numerical value. In fact, I would much rather have an idiom that's super general so I can use it in a lot ...
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0answers
7 views

Is there a word that means “legal subtleties”?

Is there a word that means "legal subtleties"? Often, we see laws worded in such a way that if you don't read them carefully, you may grossly misunderstand them and make a costly mistake, especially ...
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0answers
14 views

An antonym for “economical with truth”

He is not "economical with the truth". He is ____ with the truth. What to put in the blank? Non-Economical?
0
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1answer
14 views

“No questions” in the context

The original sentences: In the anxiety to get dubious, restless characters out of the country no questions were asked as to nationality, previous record or history, and no proof of identity was ...
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0answers
17 views

Is saying “couldn't have” here incorrect?

This is the original sentence: According to the police, it’s impossible that the prisoner escaped without help from the outside. This is the transformation that's given as correct: The police ...
0
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1answer
17 views

About the use of “whenever” in the headline “Why Working Till Whenever Is a Risky Retirement Strategy”

Does whenever in the construction: Why Working Till Whenever Is a Risky Retirement Strategy play the role of an adverb? And more generally is it grammatical to follow up a preposition with an ...
2
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2answers
17 views

With it the play?

This introduction is taking forever. I wish they'd just get on with it the play. I just came across this sentence on this link Merriam Dictionary But is that sentence grammatically correct? I mean "...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Possessive 's with inanimate nouns (e.g. programming languages)

It has bothered me for a while. I am a software developer and I keep noticing things like the features of the Java 8's release during C++'s development period This method is one of the ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Gerund and infinitive

We know some verbs followed by gerunds. When these verbs used with noun like in my example , should we always use them with infinitives ? "Shop doesn't allow smoking." (Without noun ) "I allow ...
-1
votes
1answer
23 views

What is the meaning of “The shame of [something]”?

I didn't find the meaning of The shame of [something] in my search on the internet and that's why I can't conclude its meaning precisely. I want to use The shame of his book for some text in this ...
0
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1answer
37 views

have had problem

Police claimed to have had sent the file. As have-had is used to connect past with present then how this sentence make any sense??

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