All Questions

0
votes
1answer
5 views

He lives as he wants

Which is correct: He lives as he wants He lives how he wants?
1
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2answers
12 views

What would you call this weird metallic apparatus that allows you to lift people?

The metallic bar that forms like a sort of inclined v, what would you call it. What's the most specific term you can find for it, and what's the most general term (name not related to its function if ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

What do you call a text we append at the end of a work after it was published?

Sometimes, news articles, scientific articles and other works add a small text to correct certain things that were said, but happened to be wrong, so how do you call this type of text we append like ...
0
votes
2answers
12 views

What does 'steeped with" mean?

What does "steeped with" mean? I used this link: https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/steep_2 From the start, workers receive indoctrination into the BMW Way. They are ...
1
vote
1answer
15 views

Shouldn't there be “it” instead of “he” in this sentence?

I read a sentence in "The Hindu" which was: An NCLAT bench, headed by Chairman Justice S.J. Mukhopadhaya, said he would like to..... I think "it" should be used instead of "he" the because bench is ...
0
votes
2answers
12 views

What preposition would be proper with threshold?

When I want to say like: The number 150 of members was the threshold _________ a small band changed into a large band. Should I use: over which? at which? through which?
0
votes
1answer
19 views

A rude/street-model equivalent for “He afraids of me too much”

Which one of the following sentences (or probabely your suggested one which would sound more suited to the case in my question) is commonly used to imply that someone is really scares of you? He ...
-1
votes
1answer
13 views

Thank you email at office [on hold]

Could you give me better phrases than this? The situation is that you took 1week leave for vacation and want to say thanks to coworkers. " title: Thank you Thank you so much for your assistance ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

'more smooth' or 'more smoother'? Which is right?

Curve A is more smooth than curve B Should 'smooth' be replaced by 'smoother'?
0
votes
1answer
12 views

When should I use the word “of”

In the sentence: The detonator for a nuclear device may be made of_____: A) two pieces of equipment B) two equipment pieces I strongly feel that the correct option is A. But why? When should I use ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

“Once bitten, twice shy” Vs “A burnt child, dreads fire”

I need to know which one of the following synonymous proverbs is widely used by American English speakers: Once bitten, twice shy. A burnt child, dreads fire. I don't know whether they ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Beware of Greeks bearing gifts

I am looking for an English equivalent for a proverb of my language which says: "A wolf (a bad person) will never laugh at you, but it wants to get something (an achievment) from you". I have found a ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

How to say that something is intuitively right?

Here the 'something' means a theory or a principle. My sentence is While this principle can only be appropriately understood in terms of rigorous theorems (see below for some), it is in ...
0
votes
3answers
26 views

A crow is never whiter for washing itself often

There is a proverb in my language which says: "Finally, a wolf's cub, would be grow up as a wolf, although it is rised along with a human being." For more clarification, please consider the following ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Should I use have or has?

Should I use 'have' or 'has' for the following sentence? I hope you and your class has a great day. I hope you and your class have a great day.
0
votes
1answer
14 views

An old fox understands the trap

Is the proverb "an old fox understands the trap" considered as a common English proverb? If yes, what does it exactly mean? If no, what is the exact equivalent for that in everyday speech?
0
votes
2answers
9 views

It is good for you to hep the lady

It is good for you to hep the lady. It is good of you to hep the lady. You are good to help the lady. Are the sentences all grammatical? Are there any differences among them? Do we have to use ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

What does “moonbeam” mean in this sentence?

Since the outset of last season, Curry has cut down on his circus shots, in part to ingratiate Durant. But the Warriors and their fans feed off those 30-foot moonbeams, low percentage for anybody but ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Which is the correct word to use: “I'll rather” or “I'd rather”?

I want to write a sentence to a friend indicating that instead of looking at the one thing, it's better to look at something else. Do I say, "I'd rather" or I'll rather" look?
1
vote
1answer
10 views

Is “ingratiate someone” idiomatic?

All major dictionaries provide the usage of the verb "ingratiate" as "ingratiate oneself with people". However, I just came across this line: Since the outset of last season, Curry has cut down on ...
0
votes
1answer
10 views

When to use enjoy instead of relish?

I did a search on Google and found that the phrase "relish a smoke" is more or less never used, while "enjoy a smoke" gives me more than 14 million results. I thought "relish" means "enjoy" and thus ...
0
votes
0answers
2 views

What is the basic difference between these two?

1) I have seen everything today 2) I saw everything today How is the first line different from the 2nd please explain?
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0answers
6 views

I am feeling well, though not feeling well but feeling good

I was thinking about sentences like: It sounds good It sounds well I didn't see a difference and couldn't understand why "good" was used more often than "well" and I found some interesting example.....
0
votes
1answer
21 views

omission of “which are” - in letters two inches high

His name was emblazoned across the headlines of the newspapers in letters two inches high. Is "which are" omitted between "in letters" and "two inches high"? And is "two inches high" an adjective ...
0
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0answers
10 views

“tap” vs. “faucet” [duplicate]

We have this device broken at work, for several days now. But I do not know how to refer to it. I can see that tap and faucet are mostly synonyms. By I have this feeling that they are not 100% ...
1
vote
2answers
9 views

“Join us!” vs “Join in us!”

I ran today into a weird piece of English. We were a few colleagues chit-chatting on the hallway at work. Another colleague passed by, and we invited him to chat with us. I expected the invitation ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Water is not coming from/out of the tap

If we turn on the tap and water doesn't flow out of it,what will be used: Water is not coming from the tap . Water is not coming out of the tap. There is no water in the tap.. What ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

How to say: You do not have enough background knowledge to take/continue a course?

I am trying to write an email and do not know how to say this properly: You should not/ cannot take a course in college, because of some pre-requisites that you lack.
0
votes
0answers
7 views

which word to be used “tirades” or “diatribe”

I am unable to figure out which word to be used to describe a situation of political accusations. could some one explain how/under which circumstances both are to be used.
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Is there a verb opposite to “slow down?”

I'm searching for a word that means "accelerate" but should be made of the word "fast" and would be opposite of "slow down." Something like "fast up." Example: Insulin slows down the breakdown of ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

How to understand “All could devil set me free”?

I'm listening to this song "A Whisper in the Noise - All my.." All could devil set me free I'm so tired I can't sleep All my feelings gravity's Spinning in the world over me ...
0
votes
0answers
6 views

What is the difference between ‘a pair of binoculars’ and ‘binoculars’?

What is the difference between ‘a pair of binoculars’ and ‘binoculars’? I feel they are the same.
0
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0answers
18 views

the meaning of “would” in the “before” clause

Before he would agree to make the appearance, he carefully arranged for nearly one thousand paid applauders. What is the meaning of "would" in the sentence above? Below are definitions in Merriam-...
1
vote
2answers
10 views

Why ‘over and over’ can add ‘again’?

The police questioned the men over and over again. ‘over and over’ is meaning ‘repeatedly’, and ‘again’ is meaning ‘repeatedly’ too. So ‘over and over again’ is a little weird, I feel.
0
votes
1answer
12 views

What's the difference between “”on my mind“” and “”in my mind“”?

What's the difference between "on my mind" and "in my mind"? For example, in this context "There's a lot going on in my mind". I understood that this person is worrying about a lot of things at the ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Could you write the sentence in bold in other words?

Now he starts to stir. The fluttering of his eyelids is a response to some age-old, unexplainable instinct that the sun is nearly down and his time is near. Tonight, he is particularly hungry and as ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

as I played the guitar

a. As I played the guitar, he played the piano. b. Just as I played the guitar, he played the piano. c. He played the piano as I played the guitar. d. He played the piano just as I ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

To blow air reading verses

In the culture I belong to we have a practice. We read holy verses and then blow air on the one suffering from illness. This is done to make the diseased come out of a disease or to get rid of a magic ...
2
votes
1answer
8 views

Progressive form of “have” indicating possession

I know that normally I cannot say "I am having a car", but is the following correct? Having a car, I decided to drive there. I am fine with having a car but do not expect me to drive.
0
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0answers
5 views

“Savagery” Vs “wildness”

Let's suppose all media broadcast the following news: At least 50 people were killed and 50 wounded, in a hate-filled terror attack targeting two mosques in.... And now, imagine you're making ...
0
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0answers
4 views

The pose of “fold one's hands in his/her lap”

Sybil folded her hands politely in her lap I searched the pose would be like that. If it's right, why is it not "on her lap" rather than "in her lap"?
1
vote
1answer
10 views

Word Order for Adverbs

Given the following sentences He was not technically allowed to view the reports. He was technically not allowed to view the reports. which of the given sentence is correct and why?
0
votes
0answers
10 views

What is the meaning of “away from this inclement air” in the following sentence?

What is the meaning of "away from this inclement air" in the following sentence, The state of her health is such that a return to her parents' house seems prudent, away from this inclement air. ...
0
votes
0answers
5 views

What will be the complex form of the text

what will be complex form of the sentence " None but you joined me in the party" and He, not his sister, helped me (compound)
0
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0answers
9 views

Question about the right word usage [on hold]

Overhearing someone's conversation and then telling everything back to the someone else is called
0
votes
1answer
14 views

What is the difference among “when, where, should”?

Anybody can interpret what the difference is among “when, where, should”? The example sentence I find is: A tenant may be liable to his landlord should a fire cause damage to the premises he rents. I ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Tighten and loosen a clothing

Of clothes altered to make them fit better,are "loosen" and "tighten" used for that? Like: I tightened my shirt. I loosened my shirt P.S. Edited my typos.
1
vote
1answer
14 views

How do I politely ask people to go away so that I can have a private conversation with someone?

Today I was walking with my colleagues to a restaurant, but on the way I met a friend, whom I wanted to have a small chat with. I wanted to ask my colleagues to go away and then I would catch up with ...
1
vote
2answers
17 views

Are there verbs that means “emitting a sound”?

I am not sure if there are slang verbs that allows you to say "emit a sound" in a shorter and more conversational way. A verb like that would be useful when you tell jokes or want to have some form of ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

“Who is the youngest among these three?” or “Who is the youngest of these three?”

Who is the youngest among these three? and Who is the youngest of these three? Which one is correct? Why?

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