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1
vote
1answer
129 views

Alternate word for closure

I'm developing a UI where college students can post their requests regarding some tips about clearing a game or an overdue assignment etc. Now, these requests are handled by their peers and can be ...
1
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2answers
653 views

Combing sentences with “though” and reasoning with “this is due to”

I wrote the following sentences, and I am wondering about the words used to join the fragments together. Though 2D shape of a signal post is circular, the minimum rectangle is adopted in lieu of ...
1
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1answer
75 views

error on article and punctuation

Here is my small paragraph. The accepted object is further verified by fitting a circle for a selected slice. If the circle fitting error is lower than the defined threshold, it is accepted as ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

What does pronoun “it” refer to?

"A container had a line with a number beside it for every hour."
0
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2answers
826 views

Portend vs. Presage [closed]

What's the difference between portend and presage? Do they have any differences with each other?
1
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2answers
836 views

Explanation of a paragraph about irony [closed]

It's your brother's MR. T PUPPET, which of course is kept in the apartment with a sense of profound humorous irony. But as usual with your BRO's exploits, this is no ordinary irony, or anything close ...
3
votes
3answers
140 views

“Alive in the next minute”

Consider the following sentences: We ourselves don't know whether we'll be alive in the next minute. We ourselves don't know whether we'll be alive in next minute. We ourselves don't know ...
1
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2answers
43 views

Which one is anterior to the other?

If she beats (a) him he’ll claim (b) she cheated (c). (The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language) The time of (c) is certainly earlier than (b). But which one is earlier between (a) and (b)?
1
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4answers
5k views

“Almost all workload is done by me” — is it correct and formal?

Is it correct to say, "Almost all workload is done by the server computer"? What I wonder about is the almost at the beginning of the sentence, and the usage of done. Is this suitable for a formal ...
2
votes
2answers
651 views

In and at uses in city and places or any alternative?

What is right? I live in Seattle? I live at Seattle? and can I use Hails instead and how?
1
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0answers
73 views

Difference between “within” and “inside” [duplicate]

I am Indonesian and I think my English is bad especially when it comes to vocabulary. One day I ran into the words within and inside. I opened Google Translate, translated both words into Indonesian, ...
1
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1answer
75 views

“the many” instead of “many”

We should like to thank the many people who have written to us offering their support. The sentence I quoted above is an example from Longman dictionary. I was wondering can we remove the article "...
3
votes
3answers
247 views

“Team meat” or “Meat team”

Based on what I know from English grammar, team should come after the name. The examples are "Soccer Team", "Basketball team", etc.. But recently I've seen some indie developers naming themselves as "...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

Countable and uncountable nouns

I just asked some question and I have another one and this one is more unsettling to me than the previous one. So, how can you tell which nouns are countable and uncountable? I understand you cannot ...
1
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2answers
256 views

“Not much of skyscraper by today’s standards, is it really?”

Please help me know, what is the exact meaning of the following sentence and what could be the context where I would use it? Not much of skyscraper by today’s standards, is it really?
1
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1answer
74 views

Usage of “this” and “that” in logical and mathematical argumentation

I know that the use of those - [is "those" here correct since it is referring to something I already mentioned?] - words commonly depend upon the (physical) distance to the referring object. But ...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Sentence with 'issue' and 'issue': Is it even grammatical?

Does this make sense and is this grammatical? It’s a very difficult issue to push because of the issue that security comes first. -- The Accidental Victims of Morsi's Fall, New Yorker, ...
2
votes
2answers
275 views

“Incredulous” as an adverb

The below quote is an example that Longman has provided to illustrate the usage of the adjective "incredulous". I believe in this example, "incredulous" in used as an adverb. Please help me understand ...
2
votes
2answers
191 views

Meaning of “study” in context [closed]

The children studied him impassively. That was an example sentence from a dictionary. Unfortunately I failed to understand its meaning. Besides, there is no more context. This is the whole shebang! ...
5
votes
1answer
761 views

The suffixes “-ridden” and “-infested”

We say compounds like "mosquito-ridden" and "shark-infested", but I haven't heard "mosquito-infested" or "shark-ridden". My question is that can we use the suffixes "-ridden" and "-infested" ...
1
vote
1answer
493 views

What does it means “The strength of any business network is essentially its weakest link.”

On a website, I saw a line that said: In Information Technology, the “network” defines the layered infrastructure by which information is moved. Given the vital nature of a well-functioning, ...
4
votes
2answers
153 views

Do you domesticate a wild animal or do you tame it?

When you want to make a wild animal, let's say a lion, give up some of its natural instincts and be nice to it's potential prey (aka human!), do you "domesticate" it or do you "tame" it? I couldn't ...
0
votes
2answers
12k views

I'd rather you didn't, if you don't mind

I would like to know if is there something which could be similar and simple for this Question's answer. And Please give me the clear meaning for this answer too. Question : Is it ok if I use your ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

“Try two for two”

Couple of times I've heard that expression. As I see it, it's used when someone gives something a second attempt. Let's see how my luck goes – shall I try two for two? A. What does "two for two" ...
0
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2answers
111 views

Ambiguous to-infinitive: “Obama rejects G20 pressure to abandon Syria air strike plan.”

Obama rejects G20 pressure to abandon Syria air strike plan. I think this news headline is ambiguous because the infinitive clause could attach to either G20's pressure as its complement(?), or to ...
1
vote
2answers
641 views

What does “or” mean in this sentence?

I'm confused by the meaning of or in this sentence: Encryption poses a problem for intelligence agencies by scrambling data with a secret code so that even if they, or any other third-party, ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a proverb that means “to solve two problems at once”?

In my language, we have a proverb that means "to solve two problems with only one solution". It would be literally translated as: I've killed two bunnies with only one hit How would this be said ...
0
votes
1answer
283 views

Shouldn't there be a preposition 'like' in “She looked every bit a princess.”?

She looked every bit a princess. Doesn't this sentence need the preposition like, as in "She looked every bit like a princess."?
1
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1answer
81 views

“Eat in one day” vs. “eat on one day”

The doctor asked me to have a record of food routine like what I eat in/on one day. Which is grammatically right to use?
1
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2answers
7k views

“Peeing” versus “pissing” versus “taking a pee”

I am a doctor; my friend is a patient. I caught my friend taking a piss. I forgot to give him a pee sample tube to check on his health via urinal test, and I want to ask him: Perhaps you are ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

to hear or to have heard

“Major Toyama was killed in Tokyo in March 1945, in the line of duty, during an air raid.” “I'm very sorry to hear that.” (Kafka on the Shore, tr. by Philip Gabriel) Logically, to hear precedes I’...
2
votes
2answers
420 views

Does “tree-borne raft” mean that the raft is made of trees (woods)?

Does "tree-borne raft" mean that the raft is made of trees (woods)? Freddy wants a tree-house, and I always meant to build one in the copper beech. Nothing fancy – just a sort of tree-borne raft, ...
0
votes
1answer
422 views

What does “twittering away to itself” mean?

What does "twittering away to itself" mean? Does it mean that the radio is twittering and the sound generated by the radio is outward from it? White hair endows you with the demeanour of a friendly ...
0
votes
3answers
171 views

“Hyacinths on (what I fondly call) my rockery”

Satin white, Persian purple, oil-paint yellow. When I planted these birches they were broomstick-height, and now look at them. They tap our bedroom window on stormy nights. Hyacinths on (what I fondly ...
1
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2answers
676 views

How can I translate the phrase “Does it make sense?”

Very often when a person describes his point he asks the audience a question. Does it make sense? Is it correct to rephrase it as "Is it understandable?"
1
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1answer
50 views

“People leave their premises permanently when they are old.”

Dictionaries define retire as "to leave your job or stop working because of old age." Can I rephrase it like below by saying "leaving a workplace forever"? People leave their premises permanently ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

a first versus the first [duplicate]

When I come to I'm in thick brush, lying there on the damp ground like some log. I can't see a thing, it's so dark. My head propped up by prickly brambles, I take a deep breath and smell plants, ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

implication of perfect tense

Harry had the best morning he'd had in a long time. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) The prefect tense above makes a range of which the best is selected out. So, in fact, he’d had in long ...
2
votes
1answer
398 views

What is the verb for 'stepping on or into something unintentionally'?

Let's say I am walking down the hall and I step on a bottle or a ball and I lose my balance, or say I am walking down the road and I hit a stone and I drop something I was carrying in my hand. In ...
5
votes
2answers
468 views

Differences between “compel” and “impel” in context

Would you please help me understand what are the possible differences between these sentences in terms of meaning and connotation? She felt compelled to resign because of the scandal. She felt ...
1
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2answers
57 views

Meaning of “find”

✲He stopped finding the key.            [achievements] (1)    He stopped painting the house.    [accomplishment] (2) (The ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Wh question structure

What you look like. What do you look like? When forming the wh question, do I need to use a verb or auxiliary verb in between wh and subject? What · he said · turned out to be true? What · ...
1
vote
1answer
129 views

be + emotional adjectives

Be happy! You mustn’t be sad (= don't be sad). (Essential Grammar in Use) I’m confused whether it’s possible to order other people to have certain emotional accomplishment. Do the two sentences ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

“Can't” versus “couldn't”

In the following text, should I replace the highlighted can't with couldn't? Furthermore, the third point the lecture uses to contradict the passage is that organic foods don't benefit small famers....
4
votes
2answers
885 views

Fast or quick eater?

Is "fast" interchangeable with "quick" when it comes to eating? I am a quick eater. I am a fast eater. I hear people say "don't eat too quickly" but not "fastly," so I'm wondering if one of ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Calling two persons

How do you write the spoken word that you use to call two people by name? John! Mike! Come over here. John and Mike, come over here. John, Mike, come over here. Which are the above ...
1
vote
1answer
141 views

Why isn't there any indentation?

  It was the best evening of Harry’s life, better than winning at Quidditch, or Christmas, or knocking out mountain trolls… he would never, ever forget tonight. Harry had almost ...
3
votes
2answers
18k views

Is “him or her self” correct grammar?

I have this sentence: I completely believe that teenager working is the foundation step for any child to rely on him or her self. Is this correct? Should I instead say “himself or herself”?
1
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2answers
3k views

What are the differences between “All right” and “That's all right.”

When someone says “Thank you”, we may say “That's all right.” I wonder, what does “that” refer to ? What's the meaning of “all right”? When you agree someone's proposal, you would say “OK” or “All ...
2
votes
3answers
270 views

The proofs will all be based on the following “remark”

The proofs will all be based on the following remark Is the “remark” used rightly? “Remark” was translated into a Chinese word with the meaning of "fact". It seems “remark” has the meaning of ...

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