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0
votes
2answers
83 views

Usage of “lose” in the context of place

One of the meanings of "to lose" is "not being able to find". "I lose my umbrella very often." is okay. But what if I use it to mention a place that I can not find. For example: "Every time I go to ...
0
votes
1answer
86 views

What does this structure mean?

Whatever book resides in the pantheon of grand literature defies dictionary-free reading, unlike one of those faddish, modern commercial novels. This structure is beyond me. What is the syntax here ...
0
votes
2answers
318 views

Could you please define the words contributors and span in the following text in a very very simple English

History of medicine and their use: Plants have been collected cultivated harvested for the healing properties and used for the treatment of illness for centuries. Contributors to the current ...
0
votes
3answers
928 views

Lift Up, Lift Back

Could there be a difference between "lift up something" and "lift back something", like: He lifted back his head. He lifted up his head. Are these sentences different?
2
votes
1answer
109 views

Is “consign” a negative verb?

I consulted Definition 1, in which the definition and examples are ambiguous about the connotation. Yet Definition 1.2 is surely negative: '...to be rid ....' So what's the connotation? I thought to ...
4
votes
1answer
89 views

Usage of word ME with nouns

I found a strange usage of word ME reading one book and I wonder what the author means. I thought this could be a misspelling of word MY but it happens alot. Or is it a special addition to show that ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

More than 9 hundred as hundreds?

In German, we often use "Elfhundert" (literally, "eleven hundred") for 1100 or "neunzehnhundert" ("nineteen hundred") for 1900; but is this correct in English?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

What does “It's I'll be here” mean?

I found a song where I don't understand the meaning of it is: Or when the valley's hushed and white with snow, It's I'll be here in sunshine or in shadow, and The summer's gone, and all ...
2
votes
2answers
774 views

Put Under Investigation

Is this: to be put under investigation nonstandard English relative to: to be under investigation ?
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Usage of “wanna”, “hafta”

In "THE MORPHOLEXICAL NATURE OF ENGLISH to-CONTRACTION", Pullum quotes four examples of usage of "wants to"/"wansta": (5) a. Teddy is the man Mike wants to send. b. Teddy is the man Mike wants ...
1
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4answers
162 views

Is this way of reading the number 334400 correct?

334400 new jobs. Three hundred thirty four thousand four haundered thousands new job.
2
votes
3answers
6k views

as suggested & as is suggested & as it is suggested

"This second level was used both as a dormitory and a dining room by the garrison (which was made up of about twenty soldiers), as suggested by the fireplace, the old utensils and the garrison officer’...
0
votes
1answer
429 views

What could be the answer to this Oxford's example sentence?

On OALD, it's mentioned: whereabouts (n) - the place where somebody/something is The example below is quite clear - Hs whereabouts are/is still unknown. This means, where is he, is still unknown. ...
1
vote
1answer
857 views

What does “to top matters off” mean?

I ran into this: And, to top matters off, I just received a Wilderness Society newsletter about impending fracking in the ... region of northern Western ..., a prime and important wilderness area ...
0
votes
1answer
32k views

'…late night' vs. '…late at night' vs '… late in night'

Is there any difference? Yes, on 23rd, I was working late night (Example is here) over Yes, on 23rd, I was working late at night (Example is here) over Yes, on 23rd, I was working late in ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

“admit” vs “admit of”

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/admit?q=admit: 3. [with object] Accept as valid: 4. [no object] (admit of) Allow the possibility of: What are the similarities and ...
1
vote
4answers
773 views

Meaning of 'yet' in “I hope yet to live…”

On 9 June 1942, Lord Wedgwood opened the debate in the British House of Lords by alleging that Britain had reneged on its commitments and urging that the League of Nations mandate over Palestine be ...
5
votes
2answers
593 views

In The Meantime

A Google cache can show a web page as it appeared at a point in time in the past: On a particular google cache page, this caption was found: link It is a snapshot of the page as it appeared on ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

I have something urgent {need / needs} your help?

I want to ask for help from someone and it's quite urgent. What should I say? I have something urgent need your help? or I have something urgent needs your help? or even something else? ...
1
vote
1answer
124 views

? Your boss tells you not to bother taking off your coat

I read about this sentence "Your boss tells you not to bother taking off your coat" in a joke book. But I cannot catch the ethos of this kind of humor. Could someone please unravel it? The original ...
2
votes
1answer
393 views

to be down to something - meaning

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/shaky-start-ukraine-turns-eastern-offensive-around-224521910.html Analysts say the dramatic turnaround is down to a combination of growing professionalism and ...
2
votes
3answers
10k views

“as” as a conjunction or preposition

1: He doesn't play half as well as his sister does. 2: He doesn't play half as well as his sister. In sentence one, the second "as" is a conjunction. Am I right? In sentence two, should I take the ...
-1
votes
1answer
57 views

Using “Base In” Correctly

Does any native speakers object to "base themselves" being used on people? A company could base itself in some city. So, is it okay to say the Royal couple based themselves at some place?
5
votes
7answers
3k views

The meaning of “shooting” in this sentence “Here's the HTML we're shooting to generate”

I don't know what "shooting" means in this sentence: This is where the rubber meets the road. Let's start by building a page that just spits out our DB entries in a mildly pretty form. Here's the ...
1
vote
1answer
336 views

Is “bask someone in something” legitimate?

If I wish to say I enjoy doing something, can I say alternatively that I bask myself in doing that thing? Is such usage of "bask in" legitimate?
2
votes
1answer
96 views

What does “two eye fulls” mean in this context?

A year in the making, the full six minute stopmotion short features the voice of Josie Long, one zillion hand carved tiny things, literally tens of carved foam puppets, two eye fulls of in-camera, ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

What does let oneself into somewhere mean?

One of my friends has explained the following to clear the difference between these. Nevertheless, I cannot understand them, well. In addition, are they correct? Sophie let herself quickly into the ...
1
vote
2answers
81 views

The relative pronoun 'which' in this sentence AND the ensuing omssion

The complete sentence: Yet I should point out before I proceed with this line that when I use ‘ideology,’ I do not mean to imply the now-familiar sinister connotations of mischief or falsehood ...
4
votes
2answers
10k views

What does “french me” mean?

I was watching Dexter series when Vince Masuka said to Debra: "You will have to french me." So what does it mean? Thank you!
0
votes
2answers
204 views

Could you help me with this passage

I have been warned. When I decided to end my eight-year stint in Washington DC and decamp to Los Angeles last summer, my friends in the capital looked at me like I had announced plans to eject myself ...
2
votes
1answer
11k views

Meaning of “I will have you”

In a book I'm reading a character says "One day I will have you, de Vienne.", refering to her master, who she doesn't like. What does it mean, exactly? I guess it's something like "I will kill you ...
1
vote
1answer
799 views

Usage Of “Make For ”

I am trying to figure out the correct usage of "made for". Suppose human error caused an accident: Human error led to the accident. Human error made for the accident. Is this usage of "make ...
2
votes
1answer
482 views

“non-personal reasons”

You know all those people who do something for personal reasons, e.g. quit their job, abdicate from politics etc. Given I do something like this for a non-personal reason, e.g. I change the employer ...
0
votes
2answers
76 views

Is it possible to say this?

To say "I got greatly impressed ", could I say, "I got a great impression." Thank you. The question is whether I could say it both ways.
3
votes
2answers
8k views

Difference between “I'd like to” and “I'd like that”?

What is the difference between them? What is the rule for usage of them? Are they the same?
2
votes
1answer
417 views

Perfect Tense with and without agent

Is it necessary to have agent while constructing Perfect tense?. I mean some activities are spontaneous like Fallen, grow up, increased, expired etc. Tree has been fallen. Water level has been ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

Which of the follwing is true while reading the sentence

LA weather is perfect, but Houston has 4 seasons. The beach in galveston is warm enough to swim. Santa Monica beach is too cold for me even in summer. House in Houston very affordable. Job in Houston ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

Opioid VS narcotic in a pharmacology context

Whenever I come across the above words , I miss take them. How could I distinguish between them in a simple manner?
0
votes
3answers
243 views

Question about the meaning of the word “treat” and “moderate” in this text

Fentanyl treats moderate to severe chronic pain. This medicine is a narcotic pain reliever. Does the word "treat" here mean "act"? Does the word "moderate" mean "so so" ?
0
votes
2answers
230 views

Could you simplify the highlighted parts

To achieve PTCB Certification, candidates must satisfy the following eligibility requirements: *High school diploma or equivalent educational diploma (e.g., a GED or foreign diploma). ...
2
votes
1answer
187 views

Be he right or wrong?

Consider the following paragraph from the essay entitled "The usefulness of useless knowledge" by the founder of the Institute for Advanced Study, A. Flexner: The subject which I am discussing has ...
9
votes
3answers
6k views

“Reason to visit” or “Reason for visit”

"Reason to visit" or "Reason for visit" ? Which one is correct grammatically?
0
votes
2answers
107 views

How can get along the “uncertainty” with the “certainty” in the same context

Let’s consider the following quote from “Oliver Twist” by Charles Dickens ”Now, if, during this brief period, Oliver had been surrounded by careful grandmothers, anxious aunts, experienced nurses, ...
8
votes
3answers
15k views

When to pronounce ‹s› as /z/ in the middle of words?

When do you pronounce ‹s› as /z/ in the middle of words? Is there any rule? I also saw there are some differences in articulating medial s between American and British accents. I already know the rule ...
3
votes
2answers
780 views

usage of but & although

Do the following sentences sound natural? But I didn’t know that then, although I learned it later. I tried doing the accounts, but although I knew some maths I found it very difficult. ...
0
votes
1answer
5k views

What does 'Be gone' mean in this expression [closed]

What does Be gone mean ? A) I don't like happiness. B) Be gone then I think it means Go die. Am I right?
2
votes
1answer
106 views

differences between way & in a way

I am wondering when to use "way" and when to use "in a way". For example, 1: I told you we should have done it my way! 2: They grinned at her in a friendly way. 3: Do it in the right way. 4: Do ...
2
votes
2answers
289 views

“to make a tired point”: is it an idiom?

What does the expression "to make a tired point" mean? For example in this sentence: To make a tired point, which one of us is truly crazy? (It is from an episode of The Simpsons. Read the script.)...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

It looks as if it’s going to rain

In the sentence "It looks as if it’s going to rain", I am wondering whether "as if it’s going to rain" is acting as a predicative clause or an adverbial clause of manner. Thank you very much!
2
votes
1answer
183 views

Use 'this' or 'that' to refer to the original post in a comment

When I'm leaving a comment to a post and I want to refer to the post, should I say 'this post' or 'that post'? It feels natural to me to say 'this post', however, my English teacher told me 'this' ...

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