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5
votes
4answers
28k views

'Give a damn' OR 'Don't give a damn'?

From TheFreeDictionary: give a damn (v): show no concern or interest; always used in the negative But then in example, it says... "She doesn't give a damn about her job" This means, she gives ...
2
votes
3answers
363 views

Is republican state's title part of the name?

Is it right if I say: Example: China Full Name: People's Republic of China Name: China Example: United States Full Name: United States of America Name: United States If wrong, then when to include ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Meaning of “would” here

After that incident, we never talked about our families again, but we did talk about our dolls. I would boast about how many animals mine had. “A cow, a pig, a really huge chicken!” And Tania would ...
1
vote
2answers
152 views

Question about the use of “that's” and the portmanteau word “tigon”

I think I've found two errors in this passage (marked as bold): Ligers tend to have characteristics more like lions than tigers. A creature can be created that’s more like a tiger, though. This ...
3
votes
2answers
20k views

Difference between “didn't” and “hadn't”

Is didn't or hadn't correct below? What is the difference? Please do not dock my pay as I was in the office but didn't brought my ID card. or Please do not dock my pay as I was in the office ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

Is anything 'sugar-coated' negative?

The context is not any food. Collins defines - sugar coated: (of a story, information, etc) written or told in a way that makes it seem more palatable It further gives an example.. a sugar-...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

she has a bluff bow, lovely lines. she's a fine sea boat. — what does “bluff bow” mean?

From the movie Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World It means she had the wind in her favor, therefore control of the engagement. And she had longer guns, so she could hit us beyond our ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Is it grammatical to say: “to ask [insert name] questions?”

I know you can say: To make sure we had plenty of time to ask her questions, we took the morning bus to her house. How about: To make sure we had plenty of time to ask Mary questions, we took ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

“I can do it too”

Can you say I can do it too meaning that I can also do what someone else just did? I had an argument with my mate who is a native speaker (or that's what she claims). I was pretty sure you can ...
3
votes
2answers
454 views

Is “as though” exactly the same as “as if” when expressing a subjunctive mood?

For example: After the operation, their dog walked around on all four legs, as if nothing had happened to it! Can "as though" be used to replace "as if" in the sentence? Is "as though" exactly ...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

Question about meaning of “would” in this context

I was so stunned by her sudden change of mood that I couldn’t process her words. I just stood there staring at her. She swung her schoolbag as if she were about to hit me on the head with it, but ...
0
votes
2answers
87 views

Why no arcticle is needed here?

Why no arcticle is needed in this sentence? In Germany (?) electrician killed a dog with an electric discharge.
1
vote
3answers
217 views

present perfect progressive?

Which sentence is better? I have been trying to contact you for 4 weeks but did not get any answer and was disappointed. But today got one at last..... I tried to contact you for 4 weeks, did not ...
1
vote
2answers
103 views

concerns on this passage regarding “barely” , “bright blue and fat” , throb

“I wanted the blue one!” Tania screamed. “The blue one with the gold rim! The blue one! The blue one!”""> Her voice rose so high that I kept an eye on my cup, hoping it would break, the ...
2
votes
2answers
111 views

Mostly played online or Played mostly online

Which version is the best: Mostly played online Played mostly online Can we say both?
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

Turn The Gun On Somebody [duplicate]

I have a separate question about the phrase "turn the gun on somebody" and "turn the knife on somebody". It seems that, according to google, "turn the gun on somebody" is more common than "turn the ...
0
votes
1answer
958 views

a synonymous phrase for 'to increase tenfold'

I know that we can say the following in the context of math: We increase a number by a factor of ten. We increase a number tenfold Remind me please of what else we can say in this context? Can we ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Does it mean that men are more likely to harass people or is it saying that men harassing men is more common than women harassing women?

Link to the source where this is found Men are more likely than women to harass. Both male and female students are more likely to be harassed by a man than by a woman. Half of male students and ...
2
votes
1answer
781 views

Meaning of Port and Dunnin

The following quote is from the Inception movie: Fischer: All right what's in the safe? Browning: Something for you.Fischer: Maurice always said it was his most precious gift to you. A will....
2
votes
1answer
566 views

Uncommon uses of 'with'

It strikes me that the way we use 'with' is more complex than we may think. So I have two questions: Can the preposition 'with' be used to mean 'about' or 'in relation to'? (sentence a and b). And ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

“A book of mine” vs “A book of my own”

I found this question while doing an exercise: ---Find the mistake: -"This is abook of mine." I think the answer is: -"This is a book of mine.", Isn't it? And is it right to say: -"...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

“It is worth informing you that…” OR

How should I convey the following concept as a native in a business letter: Also, it is worth informing you that... Also, it is worth telling you that... Also, it is worthy to inform you that... ...
5
votes
2answers
579 views

Easy way to explain “meet” versus “to meet” versus “meeting” versus “to meeting”

I'm tutoring a native Chinese speaker and having some trouble expressing the different forms of gerunds versus infinitives, specifically in the following examples. I can answer the questions myself ...
1
vote
2answers
179 views

Relationship between aspects and a particular usage of “away”

The 6th entry for away in MacMillan: [usually progressive] used for showing that someone does something continuously or for a long time Molly was at her desk working away as usual. ...
1
vote
1answer
680 views

There are a lot of goods in this shop. The goods are good. (most of the goods?)

As I know, when saying "the + plural", it can often mean "probably most" of the items (Like in "The students of my university are fine" - The size of the group is large enough to have some exceptions ...
4
votes
5answers
348 views

what is the last thing you ordered takeout? — how do you understand this sentence grammatically? I'm taking about “takeout”

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REgfziJqD14#t=1m48s (at 1 min. 48 sec., just click the link and it will take you to the exact timing automatically) What is the last thing you ordered takeout? ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

The royal use of 'We' for a single person

Is it possible in few cases where 'we' is addressed to oneself ? Maybe in a sense of honor or sometimes in a comic sense For example - I do not use the vocabulary of ordinary people. OR We do not ...
0
votes
1answer
720 views

The need FOR (the other + verb) -OR- The need OF…?

Is this sentence correct? This specific ability to care for others before the need for the other to recall that he is living... too. Context: this sentence is used to illustrate the meaning of ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

for/as a birthday present

(1) I gave her a pouch for a birthday present. (2) I gave her a pouch as a birthday present. Can the two above all be used? If they do, Isn’t there nuance difference?
7
votes
5answers
2k views

Single-word vs. phrasal verbs: When to use the latter, and is the former more formal?

When can we use phrasal verbs instead of verbs? For example, 'look back' is a phrasal verb. And the verbs 'recall' and 'remember' have the same meaning as that phrasal verb. 2. So when can we use '...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

Use of past perfect tense

We normally use past simple tense to talk about the past and past perfect tense to talk about the past in the past, i.e. to talk about some event that that happened before some other event. I often ...
0
votes
3answers
593 views

Can I use “would have had” in a hypothetical statement?

Example: Even if she was an astonomer, it would have been impossible for her to predict that. There are too many variables to handle—even for the most powerful computer. Not only it would have ...
4
votes
1answer
312 views

Gas as a liquid and as a gaseous form

Gas is a short form of gasoline and also is a word for gaseous form substance as oxygen for example and also we can make liquid gas as propane for example. The problem is all of these words can ...
3
votes
2answers
204 views

What's the difference between the word only and every in this context?

This is a question taken from a aptitude test but I am confused with the answer . Only fish oil contains Omega 3. Only foods that contain Omega 3 help with brain development. Which conclusion ...
3
votes
1answer
309 views

X is axially symmetric to Y with respect to Z

In the following figure, is it automatically correct and clear to say that X is axially symmetric to Y with respect to Z ? Is there any better way to express this fact?
5
votes
2answers
618 views

Rules for repeating “to”

I often don't know whether I should repeat the "to". E.g.: To enable the car to perform jumps between blocks or simply to go faster, accelerator blocks can be placed, which as the name ...
0
votes
1answer
226 views

When I introduce an abbreviation in a title, should I introduce the abbreviation again in the text that follows?

When I introduce an abbreviation in a title, should I introduce the abbreviation again in the text that follows? Example: vs.
1
vote
1answer
214 views

Deterioration of cardboard on the line where it folds

How is it called the mark that is left on a cardboard right where it is folded?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

British Person or English Person?

Are there grammatical etiquette guidelines as to whether to refer to a person from Great Britain as a British person or an English person? Is referring to a person as a Brit insulting, even if no ...
0
votes
2answers
95 views

Four concerns on this short passage?

I was so stunned by her sudden change of mood that I couldn’t process her words. I just stood there staring at her. She swung her schoolbag as if she were about to hit me on the head with it, but ...
1
vote
1answer
166 views

Is “I'm doing this primarily for myself, so…” proper English?

Basically a quick question. Consider the phrase: I'm doing this primarily for myself, so... I'm trying to almost literally translate a widely-used expression from my language to English, but it ...
1
vote
3answers
318 views

Question about hair types

Could somebody tell me please that what is the word that you use for a person who lost most of his hair?(he is not bald yet)
3
votes
2answers
12k views

“to note” or “to note down”?

When using the verb "to note" in the sense of "to write down", for example, Note that down so you will remember it is the down necessary or not? Does Note that so you will remember it also ...
3
votes
1answer
718 views

Future Employers Are/Will Told

I have a question about present & future tenses here: Hegwood, who taught English at Duncanville High School, was placed on unpaid leave Monday. She apologized in a statement Thursday and ...
2
votes
1answer
420 views

What to call the activity of providing workshops and training

I have organized and conducted technology workshops and trainings for my employer and several clients. In some cases, it was rather teacher-oriented and lecture-like, while in others it was rather a ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

designate VS assign

One naked, bald, vaguely female doll, made of hard shiny plastic, whom I designated the mother. I made her a Greek-style tunic out of an old handkerchief and glued a lock of my own hair to her head. ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

What does “tiny baby” mean here?

Two tiny baby dolls of unidentified gender, made of hard, matte plastic, and wrapped in blankets of the same kind of plastic. Does the tiny baby mean "extremely small newborn"?
2
votes
6answers
8k views

'Is your English getting better?' or 'Does your English get better?'

I want to know difference between the following sentences. Is your English getting better? Does your English get better? I am not sure about the nuance of each. Also my book says "We use ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Why do I use preposition at notice verb?

I have some question with following sentence. 1.Don't take too much notice of it. 2.Don't take too much notice it. Q1. I want to know as to what difference between them? Q2. At native English ...
2
votes
1answer
802 views

Preposition phrase serves as the subject complement

To hold any kind of resentment is like taking rat poison and waiting for the rat to die. In the sentence, "like" is a preposition followed by gerunds. The preposition phrase "like taking rat poison ...

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