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1
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1answer
660 views

Should I use simple past tense, simple present tense, or either of them in a relative clause in a sentence talking about the past?

I would like to know whether I should use "liked," "like," or either one of them in the following sentence: He wanted a tie that he liked/likes, but he couldn't find any. I would like to know what ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

How do we punctuate an abbreviation followed by a colon?

When making bullet points of details about something, do we punctuate the abbreviation? Is it this way? The details of the Vehicle are given below: Vehicle Chassis No.: [dot and colon with no space] ...
2
votes
2answers
311 views

the meaning of 'She knew it for a fault'

She would presume to censure my own conduct, and press on me advice in matters well beyond her understanding, and give me such words as no poor man would willingly hear from his wife.’ ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“Adventurous” in a sentence

Trying to find the meaning of the adventurous in the dictionary, I came across the sentence I couldn't understand: She wanted to get away from here, and she wasn't very adventurous. The sentence ...
15
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4answers
29k views

I look forward to hearing from you or looking forward to hear from you?

Should I say I look forward to hearing from you or looking forward to hear from you? I have doubt because I know that the form of a verb is "to+ infinity" without the addition of the -ing ...
1
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1answer
352 views

to put something down

I'd like to ask if "to put something down" in sense 1 is accepted as a phrasal verb. Because the preposition down does not add any special meaning, it only shows where the motion toward.. 1.[...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

What is more acceptable “Easy admission” or “comfortable admission”?

When the admission to a university it's not so difficult, what is the more acceptable in using by English native speakers? "Our university has an easy admission" "Our university has a ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Can I say: You are out of my mind

If I don't care about my husband whatever he does or whatever he says, can I say to him "You are out of my mind"? I got a hint from "out of sight, out of mind", but something strange is that 'out of ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Which tense is acceptable to use in titles?

What tense(s) is it acceptable to use in titles? For example: In the the newspaper, or if I post on Facebook a video of someone that talked about me very nice in the video. Would I need to write in ...
0
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1answer
228 views

some doubts in one paragraph

In the following paragraph I have some doubts. The first one is in which tense is acceptable to use in this context. The other doubts are emphasized in their place. My doubts say that I'm not sure if ...
5
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2answers
873 views

Pronunciation of 'Fen', 'Fan', and 'Fang' in English

Can someone describe the difference in pronunciation between these three English words: Fen, Fan and Fang. 'Fen' is the easiest, because it's just like the first syllable in 'fence'. What other ...
0
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0answers
81 views

Word similar to chic/exotic in sentence

Word or phrase to suit the highlighted part better? Also is 'chicness' correctly used here? Intrigued by the chicness/exoticity of her rugs, I was lucky to meet her.
1
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1answer
2k views

“part/page 1 of 2” vs “part/page 1 out of 2”

What's the difference between "part 1 of 2" vs "part 1 out of 2"? Are they both correct and synonymous, the latter form being less often used? I am wondering the same when part is replaced by page.
0
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1answer
61 views

can we cancel the “had”

I saw my friends yesterday and they told me they were going to divorce, it was weird because I had seen them before and I had always thought they were a happy couple. I was shocked. Is the second ...
1
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1answer
8k views

using **to follow** or **the following**?

I was reading a vocabulary book came across with: The excellent soup was harbinger of the delicious meal to follow. I am confused of the "to follow". I know we can say "a delicious meal to eat" ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

“What about you” in the following context is correct?

My friend sent me message like this: He: "Hi, how are you" Me: "I'm fine, thank you. What about you?" He: I see television Me: Are you watching television? nice, I hope that you ...
2
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3answers
5k views

Talking about my soul. Use he, she or it?

When I'm talking about my soul (in the "paranormal" way), the correct use of the pronoun is he she or it? See the example: My soul is lost. He/She/It is lost forever. I'm asking it 'cause I ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

A phrase for exhibiting something

I wrote: The selected sentences are listed for the view of the user. I mean the software lists the sentences so that the user can view and check them, but my sentence is not valid or common, what ...
0
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2answers
151 views

Conditionals , What are the differences?

What is the difference between the two sentences: If I won the lottery, I'd buy a big house. If I had won the lottery, I'd have bought a big house. My guess is that the first sentence is mere ...
1
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1answer
1k views

the definite article before numbers

The May 1, 2013, edition of the Ames Sentinel arrived in June. The Ames Sentinel—dated May 1, 2013—arrived in June. Could you explain to me the presence of the definite article in the first ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

“The more … the more” construction

I would like to find out how to say some things about the guitar. I came up with this sentence: The more the gauge ( of the strings) the more sustain it provides. I felt there is something wrong. ...
0
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1answer
76 views

How to paraphrase this sentence?

The effects of the mechanization of women's work have not borne out the frequently held assumption that new technology is inherently revolutionary. I am perplexed to understand the above ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Make a point about something

How can I understand the following example (the very first): Could I make a point about noise levels? Is make a point an idiomatic expression or something like that?
5
votes
3answers
1k views

“Going to branch left minus” joke

I am reading this article about Margaret Hamilton, a computer scientist who wrote code for the Apollo program. Being a computer scientist (and probably also a geek to some degree) I’m afraid I don’t ...
1
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1answer
200 views

what's the meaning of “have something on edge”?

Syndrome, or MERS, outbreak, which has Korea on edge. What's the meaning of a phrase "have something on edge"? I know that 'on edge' means being worried or anxious. Does it mean that MERS makes ...
1
vote
1answer
192 views

Word to say keep up credibility of someone's recommedation? [closed]

One of my acquaintance who has a very high credibility recommended me to someone for a service I offer... I am writing a mail to thank him. I wish to convey that "I will work hard to ensure that his ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

What is exactly “op-ed”?

Let me thank you in advance. I am writing a blog for my business purpose and hit upon a word "op-ed". From the article, The incident led University of Colorado ecology professor Marc Bekoff to ...
9
votes
5answers
169k views

Its or Their to refer to a company?

The company will issue (their, its) annual report next month. In this case, should I use "its" or "their"?
0
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1answer
47 views

Which parts of this sentence needs “had” and which don't?

As the detective (had) said, the man (had) left no explanation for his death--but he (had) left something more important. This is past-tense narration. The detective talked in a previous time (e.g. ...
1
vote
1answer
881 views

An accident took place early morning/this morning

An accident took place early morning today. An accident took place early this morning. Which one is the best option out of the two and why? I believe both are correct but I do not have ...
1
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2answers
2k views

I suggest that he study/studied medicine

I suggest that he study/studied medicine. Suggest is the present form of verb. So according to it, the sentence should have study rather than studied. Studied is basically past form of the verb. But ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Can we use make up in the sense of combine that way?

My question is about British English. I've found the following meaning of make up. Can we use it when we talk about mixing two substance like If you mix sugar and water, the water will be sugary. ...
0
votes
1answer
10k views

How can I use 'in return for' in a sentence?

If you've ever swapped one of your toys with a friend in return for one of their toys, you have bartered. I understand the meaning of the sentence but when I try to use the phase in my own writing I ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

Why {you did not / did not you} drink that juice?

Which of the followings is correct? 1) why you did not drink that juice? 2) why did not you drink that juice? I think both of them are correct but I don't know which one is more formal! Any ...
4
votes
3answers
9k views

Differences between “my sister's house”/“the house of my sister”/“a house of my sister's”

1. My sister's house 2. The house of my sister. 3. A house of my sister's. Am I right when assuming that the phrase 1 and 2 indicate that my sister owns or lives just in one house whilst the third ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there a name for filled square?

When talking about circles, a "circle" refers merely to a line in the shape of a circle, whereas "disk" (or "disc") refers to a "filled circle". Is there a similar distinction for squares or ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

structure and meaning of “it was the most static the city has been since its founding”

The following is a part of an article about the linguistic diversity of New York City by Ross Perlin: The great migrations, increasingly diverse till early 20th century, came to a sudden halt with ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Demonstrative” - absorbing the pronunciation

I am a native English speaker. I just found out the correct pronunciation of "demonstrative" today. Instead of the correct /dɪmɒnstrətɪv/, I kept saying /dɛmənstreɪtɪv/ because I relate it to "...
2
votes
2answers
16k views

“I understand where you're coming from” What does it imply

"Thanks so much for getting back to me with your feedback regarding implementing a disclaimer to clearly outline our textbook solutions limits. I definitely understand where you are coming from, and I ...
2
votes
0answers
36 views

Why isn't “are” correct? [duplicate]

The sentence is: There is a mountain and a lake. I thought this sentence was wrong. But I was told it is correct. I just, I don't know. Shouldn't it be "are"? Why is "is" correct? Thanks in ...
3
votes
2answers
154 views

How do you pronounce the phrase: sleep tight

when you pronounce the phrase: "Sleep tight." do you stress both words equally? Is the 't' aspirated when the word "tight" is pronounced or it doesn't need to be aspirated?
1
vote
1answer
796 views

What does author mean in this sentence?

Many critics of Emily Bronte's novel Wuthering Heights see its second part as a counterpart that comments on, if it does not reverse, the first part, where a "Romantic" reading receives more ...
1
vote
2answers
675 views

Can I reduce “that corresponds” to “corresponding”?

I wrote: ID: the identifier of a word in the sentence that corresponds to the order of the word in the sentence, starting at 1 for each new sentence. Can I replace "that corresponds" with "...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“I'm not surprised at him/his having difficulties with the exam”

I'm not surprised at him/his having difficulties with the exam Is it him or his? Why is it so? What is the grammar rule here? What would be some other examples where this rule is used?
0
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1answer
902 views

Subject of infinitive clause with “expected”

You are expected to be well informed. Is it possible to rewrite the above sentence in this way: It is expected from you to be well informed.
0
votes
1answer
632 views

one week training; in the next month; course vs training; right usage;

Is it right sentence: Firm is planning to send me to London for one week training in the next month. "for one week training": I mean that duration of training is one week. Also is there is really ...
1
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1answer
47 views

Confusion about the constituents of sentences

I am confused about whether in the pattern "tell sb about sth", the part "sb" is regarded as indirect object or direct object.
10
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3answers
9k views

Using “must” and “have to” together

I am confused about this: Can I use Must and Have to together like: You must have to do it.
0
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1answer
25 views

When you ___ at the course, you ___ straight to the registration desk

When you __ at the course, you __ straight to the registration desk. A) will arrive / have to go B) have arrived / had to go C) arrived / will have gone D) arrive / are to go E) had arrived / ...
1
vote
1answer
204 views

What's the meaning of phrase “A is one to forget for B on the whole”?

The summer just gone was one to forget for Korea's tourism industry on the whole. What's the meaning of phrase "A is one to forget for B on the whole"? I guess it means something like that Korea's ...

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