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2
votes
4answers
79k views

You can still contact me “through” your phone vs. “via” your phone?

You can still contact me through your phone though. or You can still contact me via your phone though. The question is simple. But I am having problems with the answer, so which one is "correct"?...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

What does “the hubris of the defeated” mean? [closed]

I saw a movie "A Beautiful Mind". In the movie, a person said "hubris of the defeated" to a person who lost a game. In the language I use, it appears to mean "the statement uttered when a person ...
1
vote
1answer
195 views

Can this clause be used with both present and future reference?

I don’t mind what you do. (1) Let me know who wins. (2) -- Cambridge Grammar of the English Language CGEL says the two examples’ subordinate clauses are written as ‘deictic futures&...
6
votes
2answers
24k views

Is there any difference between “go through” and “read” a book?

Consider these two expressions: Once I am done with my assignment, I will go through the Calculus book. Once I am done with my assignment, I will read the Calculus book. Is there any ...
8
votes
2answers
30k views

meaning of “staff” in the title “senior staff software engineer”

What's meaning of the word staff when it is used in a person's title called senior staff software engineer? The dictionary definition for this word is the group of people who work for an organization,...
5
votes
1answer
89 views

Why is this 'moved' a past form? [duplicate]

"There must be some kind of story or legend behind it[=entrance stone]. Maybe it's famous and on display at a shrine or someplace." "It could be, I suppose." "Or maybe it's just in some house, ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Does “recenter” have a British spelling?

I know that "center" and "centre" are the respective American and British spellings of the word, but is "recenter" spelt "recentre" in the British way, or not? I tried to Google for "recentre", but ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

What does “with their own command” mean in the context of playing a sport?

What does this "play with their own command" mean? Captain’s Cup Navy Sports Week Monday-Friday, September 30 – October 4 • 0900 Various Locations Participants must play with their own command. ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

The meaning of “brought up”

Is this usage possible and common? In order to provide a more accepting and comfortable setting for children with autism or other special needs, AMC movie auditoriums will have their lights brought ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Meaning of “a white-looking black girl with no ostensible power”

Dr. King’s spellbinding message of hope, love, and the universality of mankind instilled the confidence that even someone like me, a white-looking black girl with no ostensible power, could create ...
2
votes
2answers
820 views

Keep it on/off/charging?

I have a question about using "keep" with "charging". I've heard people say keep your laptop off to save energy. But can you use the structure with "charging"? I am not sure if it can be used ...
2
votes
3answers
16k views

What does “I have got some time on my hands” mean?

My shift at work's kinda long, so I've got some time on my hands to, you know...whatever. Think, I guess. What does "I have got some time on my hands" mean in the above quote?
0
votes
0answers
18 views

what does“ I've got some time on my hands” mean? [duplicate]

"My shift at work's kinda long, you know? It is -so I,ve usually got some time on my hands to, you know...whatever. Think, I guess."
1
vote
1answer
151 views

What does “shop i” mean?

In this text: NAME: Samantha Greenbriar YEAR: 11 TEACHER: Fletcher PERIOD: 5 SUBJECT: Shop I ASSIGNMENT: Metalworking - Engraving GRADE: C- What does "shop i" mean?
6
votes
1answer
9k views

correct usage of “Ask of”?

I know how to use "ask of" in many cases. But I have encountered a sentence, that for me it is wrong. But, since i am not a native English speaker I can not be sure. Implement an application ...
2
votes
1answer
716 views

meaning of 'who'd be writing to you?'

   The envelope was thick and heavy, made of yellowish parchment, and the address was written in emerald-green ink. There was no stamp. Turning the envelope over, his hand trembling, ...
5
votes
1answer
673 views

Does “Joey Kangaroo” have a supplementary meaning?

My twins love Peppa Pig, and whenever it is possible I let them see the original English version. There's a rule of thumb that all "young" characters, except the piglets themselves, have a name which ...
2
votes
1answer
103 views

meaning of this semicolon

Turning the envelope over, his hand trembling, Harry saw a purple wax seal bearing a coat of arms; a lion, an eagle, a badger, and a snake surrounding a large letter H. (Harry Potter and the ...
1
vote
1answer
9k views

What is the meaning of `light my fire` in this sentence? [closed]

What is the meaning of light my fire in this sentence: You light my red fire. Hot white, and blue. American Flag? The context is the song On Our Way by Lana Del Rey: You, ooh-ooh-ooh You ...
0
votes
1answer
189 views

Is this grammatical? Nonrestrictive clause with “who”

I want to mention an author's name with his discovery. What would be a smart way to say that: Mr Adam (1808-1882), who first described the properties of "X"... Is this wording grammatically ...
11
votes
4answers
76k views

What do you call a person with a good memory? Does 'intelligent' work?

Can a person with great memory power be called intelligent? Or is there any other word or phrase to describe such a person?
4
votes
4answers
995 views

What do you call an ad-hoc outside eatery for soldiers?

What do you call the place/system where soldiers eat outside, with usually a few food carts with huge pots, and soldiers standing in line to receive food in their mess kit and eat it? In French: ...
3
votes
1answer
231 views

In 'call someone here', is 'here' locative or temporal?

I was looking at the meaning of call, one meaning says (transitive) If you call somebody somewhere, you ask or tell them to come there. One sample usage is My boss called me to his office and ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

What does “rolled over on her back” mean?

I can't picture this: I don't understand what "rolled over on her back" mean. What does the highlighted phrase mean? He demonstrated by holding his own arms above his head and making a swooning ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

Is this statement correct?

My uncle asked me to telephone my cousin and tell him that he (my uncle) will telephone to my cousin. So I sent a reply to my uncle saying: I called cousin and told him that you would call him by ...
1
vote
2answers
13k views

Can “enclosure” be used in E-mail?

"enclosure" has the meaning "attachment", can it be used in an e-mail? Are they the same in this meaning?
0
votes
1answer
66 views

“[…] which would by the end of the evening, raise nearly two million dollars”

Is the highlighted phrase an indirect way of saying "the auction raised nearly two million dollars"? The program featured a cocktail hour—the Top Spin (gin with lime juice), the 40–Love (strawberry ...
2
votes
1answer
76 views

“He lost the game to his rival but he was only complimentary.” [closed]

What is the function of only in this sentence? He lost the game to his rival but he was only complimentary.
3
votes
2answers
1k views

The function of “might”

What is the function of this "might?" I am from Niger. People there don't dare to dream big. But I thought I might dream big.
1
vote
2answers
4k views

How do I convert a verb to adjective?

I want to say "You need activate added user." but I don't know why I say it. I don't know any rule for which I can say added user.
3
votes
2answers
5k views

How to say “I suggest adding [something]”

I said to my employee: I suggest adding dtUpdate column to the table. For me it sounds wrong. I want to say: I suggest to add dtUpdate column to the table. But I know by verb pattern this is ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

Is 'where do you sit' idiomatic?

I often use the expression Where do you sit on the second floor? Where does the clerk sit here in this building? Obviously I use the verb sit to mean location? What is your location at ...
4
votes
3answers
120 views

metal reinforcements on wood

What is the name for metal elements reinforcing and protecting wooden elements, for example on coffers, doors, wooden window shutters, even covers of finest ancient books - often decorative? (my ...
2
votes
3answers
81 views

“Who has emerged as the less gutsy Nadal to his less regal Federer, playing to the heart-warmed fans”

What does the bold part mean? I don't understand the structure of it, especially the "less […] to […]" part. The match itself was something of an anticlimax. Djokovic, spent from his encounter ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

What does 'trust' mean in this context? [duplicate]

   That evening, Dudley paraded around the living room for the family in his brand-new uniform. Smeltings' boys wore maroon tailcoats, orange knickerbockers, and flat straw hats called ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

What does it refer to or what role does it take?

   One day in July, Aunt Petunia took Dudley to London to buy his Smeltings uniform, leaving Harry at Mrs. Figg's. Mrs. Figg wasn 't as bad as usual. It turned out she'd broken her leg ...
1
vote
1answer
791 views

What does “it” refer to here?

"They stuff people's heads down the toilet the first day at Stonewall," he told Harry. "Want to come upstairs and practice?" "No, thanks," said Harry. "The poor toilet's never had anything ...
9
votes
2answers
12k views

When talking of American money, what does “pennies” mean?

Time ago, I was talking with an American friend of mine. She was checking how much money she had and said "[…] a dime and four pennies." Since 100 cents make a dollar, why did she say pennies? Is ...
1
vote
2answers
100 views

Meaning of “failed to appear”

In Kaluga, south of Moscow, the strike began when trains headed from Moscow to Kiev failed to appear. Does it mean that trains departed Moscow station but they did not arrive in Kiev station? And is ...
2
votes
1answer
310 views

Why is “do” sometimes added to declarative sentences?

Many people use the word do in statements, but I don't understand the significance of doing so. For example, consider the following sentences: I know you. I do know you. I speak English. ...
2
votes
1answer
521 views

What does “I don’t even count them in the till” mean?

I don’t even count them in the till. What is the meaning of "in the till" here? I googled but got nothing for this.
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“Costs a pretty penny”

I have read "costs a pretty penny" before. Is it okay if I instead use "costs a pretty dollar" or "costs a pretty yen"?
2
votes
1answer
289 views

Is it ok to say “would have had to have played” and “to have even had”?

Are the bold parts grammatically correct? It sounds to me like the tenses are a bit redundant. In the second round, Djokovic faced Bobby Reynolds, a journeyman American making his Centre Court ...
3
votes
1answer
344 views

What does this part mean?

I don't understand the bold part. What does this mean? The hush is only more touching for being a parody of itself. What does the author want to say here? Wimbledon is the rare hallowed site that ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

On/in/at in regards to lines of a program

Say I have a program that swaps two variables: 1)read a 2)read b 3)buf=a 4)a=b 5)b=buf 6)print a 7)print b I want to say that I swap the values of a and b on (or should it be at or in?) lines 3-5 of ...
3
votes
2answers
692 views

possessive form with plural subjects

Larry and Tom own a hardware store. To me there are two possible ways to use the possessive form: Larry and Tom's hardware store. or Larry's and Tom's hardware store. The first speaks and ...
4
votes
3answers
8k views

Do English speakers in UK or US use the term “iron” for the tool to press clothes to remove creases?

Do English speakers in UK or US use the term "iron" for the tool to press clothes to remove creases? E.g. I had a problem to find pictures of iron like this: What I find mostly was this: How do the ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

“the” vs. “a/an” + clauses

Here's the situation: I meet a friend and I tell her about yesterday: “Hey, John!” “Hi, Sarah!” “How was yesterday's trip?” “It was great. Karl took me to the countryside to show me his new ...
6
votes
1answer
488 views

May I use the simple present for a series of actions within a limited time period?

It’s well-known that the present simple is used to describe an action which happens regularly and occurs during an infinite period of time (or a finite but quite long one). He sells cars. I go ...
7
votes
3answers
66k views

“The opposite of” vs. “opposite to”

Small is the opposite of big. Small is opposite to big. Is the second statement grammatical? It sounds okay to me, but only if I leave out the the.

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