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votes
2answers
164 views

Why isn’t there an article?

He turned to the right towards Capel Street. Ignatius Gallaher on the London Press! Who would have thought it possible eight years before? Still, now that he reviewed the past, Little Chandler ...
0
votes
2answers
782 views

You couldn’t find two people who are less like us

“It’s — it’s true?” faltered Professor McGonagall. “After all he’s done… all the people he’s killed… he couldn’t kill a little boy? It’s just astounding… of all the things to stop him… but how in ...
4
votes
1answer
123 views

Can one who lived be the subject of 'leave'?

“I’ve come to bring Harry to his aunt and uncle. They’re the only family he has left now.” -- Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling. OALD says leave somebody is to have family ...
4
votes
1answer
340 views

pronunciation: power

power /ˈpaʊə(r)/ (OALD) audio link Do you pronounce power's vowels in order of (1) -> (2) -> (3) or other ways?
0
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1answer
89 views

What does “ever” mean in this sentence?

A passion for books and the words inside them saved me from ever knowing a moment’s loneliness during library hours. -- The Power of Words by Benita Porter What do I have to pick up for the ‘...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

What does “Slam dunk” mean in this sentence?

What exactly does "slam dunk" mean in this sentence?? Officials Warn Syria Chemical Weapons Intel Is ‘No Slam Dunk’ --- http://world.time.com/2013/08/29/officials-warn-chemical-weapons-intel-...
3
votes
1answer
840 views

How to pronounce “I'll say”

When pronouncing the expression "I'll say", on which word I should put the emphasis?
3
votes
2answers
208 views

What is the word for 'building as a whole'?

Let's say my apartments are in three buildings and they are surrounded by a fence outside; let's say I drop my wallet somewhere inside one of those buildings, so I'll say I dropped wallet somewhere ...
0
votes
1answer
637 views

“Aim life with Money”

I am planning for a tattoo with an image of a target, and the caption I thought of is "Aim life with money". Money being an arrow, and life being the "center of the target". I want to make a point, ...
1
vote
2answers
352 views

Does using harder English help gain more respect during conversation or in writing?

It is always taught to use simple English in day-to-day life and I follow it carefully. As a student in IT sector, I use simple English myself as this particular industry does not revolve around ...
2
votes
1answer
436 views

Is “ceteris paribus” used in formal American English?

A question for American people (English people are welcomed as well but I guess their use of English is more formal): do you use ceteris paribus in some formal text? If not, what would be the best ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

What is the word for the ability to foresee?

What is the word for the quality to foresee? Note that, the word should not be related to specific fields like astrology. I am writing an article and the word should be such as it can be used in this ...
3
votes
2answers
9k views

What does “we sent his way” mean in this sentence?

The following paragraph is from "Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2" written by Jeff Kinney. I'm sure our Giving Tree guy will throw his sweater in the trash, along with the ten cans of yams we sent his way ...
3
votes
3answers
414 views

“By” or “with” in this sentence?

I'm happy enough with hugging you like this! Is it better if use "by" instead of "with" in this sentence? Is there another word that would be even better?
0
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3answers
3k views

we'll coming back

"There she is!" said Corley. At the corner of Hume Street a young woman was standing. She wore a blue dress and a white sailor hat. She stood on the curbstone, swinging a sunshade in one hand. ...
0
votes
2answers
974 views

“celebration is good to have”

To my mind, celebration is good to have, but I do not encourage spending too much money. To my mind, to have celebration is good, but I do not encourage spending too much money. Are the two ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

“Writer” or “Author” when talking about somebody who “creates” book stories/novels as a professional?

This question has been split from a previous double-question here. Which of the following is preferable? Jack London and Charles Dickens were both great writers. Jack London and Charles ...
0
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2answers
592 views

Repeating the subject in a subordinate sentence

Just a short while ago I edited a question published on EL&U(1) and, doing this, I added the following paragraph: The words that express the tangible and visible things of our experience, such ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “pre-Industrial-Revolution” spelled and hypenated correctly?

I found this quote online: The hackish senses of "engine" are actually close to its original, pre-Industrial-Revolution sense of a skill, clever device, or instrument (the word is cognate to "...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the difference in pronunciation between “rider” and “writer”?

This question has been split from its original form into two questions. The other half of this question is now here. In the following sentence: Jack London and Charles Dickens were both great ...
1
vote
2answers
100 views

Can issues pave the way?

Another phrase-usage question, can you say : These issues pave the way for new opportunities in several markets. and does it sound sexy or weird ?
2
votes
3answers
504 views

Is the tense-agreement in this question specific to “dare not”, or are there other examples?

He knew she dare not tell her father. Kim daren’t tell them so I had to do it myself. -- The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, p109n My mother tongue, Korean, has tense ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “complice”and “accomplice”?

What is the difference between "complice" and "accomplice"? Both means an associate person during some act or something. But what is the difference?
3
votes
1answer
866 views

“Picking my wallet up” or “Picking up my wallet”?

I need some clarification here about the two sentences below. Please explain which one is correct and why. A) Thanks for picking my wallet up. B) Thanks for picking up my wallet.
2
votes
1answer
535 views

What is the idiomatic form of the expression 'did you come from upstairs'

Let's say I am in a building with multiple floors, I see my friend in the lobby and I want to ask him Did you come from upstairs? or Are you coming from upstairs (if I know he has just come.) ...
4
votes
1answer
163 views

Can you say “economic agnostic”?

Can you say "economic agnostic" like in the following sentence? Strategy cannot be economic agnostic.
5
votes
3answers
66k views

“done” vs “have done”

I think this sentence is correct. I done something. This is also correct. I have done something. What are the involved tense? How are they different?
2
votes
3answers
5k views

Difference between “daily” and “every day”

When can I say "I use this daily" or "I use this every day"? What about hourly? Is it correct to say "I will send this hourly"? It seems incorrect, to me.
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Is “if I were president of this country, I would have made everyone in this country rich” grammatically correct?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? If I were president of this country, I would have made everyone in this country rich. What I mean is "if (something happened in the past) then (...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

meaning of infinitives

thankful (to do something) I was thankful to see they'd all arrived safely. thankful (for something) He wasn't badly hurt—that's something to be thankful for. (OALD) I suppose that the first ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

Is “go to school in” correct?

I have read a passage as following: Most buildings are built for people to live in, work in, or go to school in. But some buildings are built just to hang pictures in. These buildings are called ...
2
votes
2answers
379 views

Is the word “unsaint” used in English?

Do casual native English speakers understand the word unsaint as the opposite to the word saint? Or do they interpret it as something different or even don't understand it at all?
2
votes
2answers
315 views

Is “Has the lad a dog?”correct?

I have read a very short passage from an American textbook which is for elementary school students. Has the lad a dog? The lad has a fat dog. The dog has Nat's cap. Nat and Rab ran. Rab ran ...
3
votes
2answers
18k views

Basing or Based?

Which one of these two sentences is correct? and why? "Many companies judge students based on their teachers' references" "Many companies judge students basing on their teachers' references" ...
0
votes
1answer
321 views

What should I write instead of “whom he or she wants to participate”?

I have a project and documentation for it. My command writes "[…] whom he or she wants to participate […]." Is it correct to write he or she, or should I write another word, such as user, person, or ...
0
votes
1answer
14k views

How to say 'It's perfect for me'

My owner sent me an email saying "See attachment how the table is displayed." I like how the table is shown, and I want to say "it's nice for me" or "it's perfect for me." What is the correct ...
-1
votes
2answers
417 views

Ears pop with pressure?

What does "even as her ears popped with pressure" mean in the following text? Does it mean her ears will be blown up almost by great pressure? Outside, everything was dark. There was only the ...
0
votes
1answer
517 views

What does “focused and narrowed” mean?

What does the highlighted part means? The ground rumbled beneath her, even as her ears popped with pressure –more laughter from The Tortoise in the Lake, even as the darkness of space focused and ...
2
votes
2answers
351 views

Difference between “Human being history” and “Human history”

Is there any difference between “human history” and “human being history”? Are those focus on two different aspects of history? I know that human and human being are interchangeable, but when we ...
0
votes
2answers
248 views

Distorted Cabin & Oily Sheen: What is going on in this paragraph?

I have been reading a book, and I have a question about the following excerpt: "We're here," The Tortoise in the Lake said, cutting across Dong Huong's gloomy thoughts. "I can see nothing." ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What does this 'fancy' mean?

If anyone looked out of their window now, even beady-eyed Mrs. Dursley, they wouldn’t be able to see anything that was happening down on the pavement. Dumbledore slipped the Put-Outer back inside ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

When should I use 'its' vs 'their'?

I have a sentence as follows: Architectural analysis is an initial step in defining the system components and their relationships. Can I use "its relationships" instead of "their relationships"?
1
vote
1answer
802 views

In this passage, what does “a pair of” refer to?

“Er — Petunia, dear — you haven’t heard from your sister lately, have you?” As he had expected, Mrs. Dursley looked shocked and angry. After all, they normally pretended she didn’t have a sister. ...
4
votes
1answer
134 views

Exclamatives or Free relatives

  "Tell us," said Mahony pertly to the man, "how many have you yourself?"   The man smiled as before and said that when he was our age he had lots of sweethearts.   ...
0
votes
1answer
634 views

I enjoyed not only what

Great post. I enjoyed not only what said about how that word should be written, but, especially, how all the matter has been treated. I would like to know if the sentence above is correct. Just a ...
3
votes
2answers
281 views

Tools for knowing if a word is commonly known [closed]

I came across someone using the word "animadvert". I didn't think it was a real English word, but a web search indicates that it is. I suspect that it's a word likely to be unknown to most English ...
2
votes
1answer
121 views

Is “home run” the equivalent of four bases?

We were all more naive a decade ago. We hoped that a single application of drugs would result in a dramatic benefit. We now understand it's much more complicated than that. People are optimistic but ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

'like anything' as an intensifier

I have seen a person using 'like anything' as intensifier. Freedictionary website gave these example of 'like anything':- He ran like anything. (intensifier; usually euphemistic) We worked like ...
0
votes
1answer
732 views

Is the use of “scalable” or “scalability” correct in this sentence?

Which of the following is grammatical? How is the scalability of method 1? How scalable is the method 1?
1
vote
1answer
3k views

“I was worried that you might/may”

Is there a difference between "may" and "might" when I want to say after giving a friend a gift, "I was worried that you might not like your gift"? I know that "might" is a lot less likely to ...

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