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8
votes
4answers
16k views

“It is with extremely mixed emotions..”

Whenever somebody resigns, or does something out of the ordinary, the president at our institution always sends out an email that begins It is with extremely mixed emotions that I announce the ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

Is “sat a horse” grammatical?

I came across the phrase "sat a horse" in a novel. I ignored it as a typo, thinking it should have been "I sat on a horse." However I searched this on Google now and I find a number of examples where ...
19
votes
2answers
669 views

Past tense: learned/learnt, dreamed/dreamt?

In my very first question, Carlo made an edit stating that learnt is a rare past tense of learn. I am accustomed to using learnt for past tense and learned as an adjective (as in He is a learned ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Question regarding simple/compound/complex sentences

We read about these three classes of sentences. For example, It is too hot to go out without an umbrella. (Simple) It is so hot that we cannot go out without an umbrella. (Complex) It is very hot and ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Converting from “too” to “enough”

I have this sentence: It is too hot to handle. How do I rewrite it using enough in place of too? Is the following right? Is there some other possibility? It is not cold enough to handle. What is ...
4
votes
4answers
407 views

Looking behind or Looking backwards

Let's say I go to see my manager and I when I enter his office, he is sitting with his back facing me and doing something like talking to someone who I couldn't see. How should I describe this? ...
4
votes
3answers
418 views

Comparing “atom bomb” & “atomic bomb” with “atom explosion” & “atomic explosion”

Merriam Webster says that "atom" is a noun, not an adjective, albeit there is the entry "atom bomb" in which, I think, "atom" is used as an adjective. Google Books has a lot of hits for "atom ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Verb + Preposition (how to learn)

I have been learning English recently, but I have problems with learning English verbs and prepositions. I know how some verbs work. I let you do it I allow you to do it I said to you a week ago I ...
5
votes
1answer
951 views

“In fact” or “As a matter of fact” as a linker

Is it appropriate to use "in fact" or "as a matter of fact" as a linker between the two sentences? If neither is suitable, which one should be used here? The comedian who primarily performs on TV ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

Appointment vs. meeting (vs. date)

What is the difference in meaning between these words? I would use date if I were single, I like a woman, and I want to spend some time with her; let's say that this word is different from the other ...
9
votes
2answers
13k views

“Many a year” vs. “many years”

so soon they were all seated at Beorn's table, and half had not seen such a gathering for many a year. Why is many a year used? Should not many years be used? What is the difference between many a ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the use of 'diagonal' correct in this context?

Consider this expression This gift is from the guy who sits diagonal to me. Is using diagonal correct here or should I use something else?
4
votes
3answers
7k views

Use of commas when addressing someone

For some reason my brain tells me that the following sentence is grammatically correct... Thanks, John. Your gift was much appreciated. Instead of... Thanks John, your gift was much ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

How can I rewrite this sentence?

The System must be secure: a. Data encryption. b. User Identification using SIM number and a password. c. User Authentication using verification code. I think the sentence is not ...
-4
votes
1answer
136 views

Is “lose” correct in this context? [closed]

The system must be recoverable to protect data from any lose. I don't know if it is grammatically correct; in particular, I don't know if lose is correct, or what I should use instead of it.
2
votes
1answer
71 views

“AND” with data and countable thing

I have the following sentence. The system must be scalable so it will remain effective when there is a significant increase in data and the number of users. I don't know if it is grammatically ...
3
votes
2answers
429 views

What are “is” and “was” pointing to, or referring to in these sentences?

Frank is my best friend! Frank was my best friend! Here, is and was are pointing to the present time, and past time. Mom: Look, you dirty little grub! Child: Mum, it wasn't my fault. What is wasn't ...
8
votes
3answers
453 views

What tense should we use in the present time (now) to refer to an event happening during a future other event?

I have planned a meeting, that will be the day after tomorrow. If now I want to tell someone about the main point of the meeting, what could I choose? During the meeting we are discussing about ...
11
votes
3answers
2k views

Do Canadians and Americans really use “gotten” as past participle when speaking?

The OALD has the following note about get: In spoken North American English the past participle got•ten /ˈɡɒtn/ /ˈɡɑːtn/ is almost always used. I know that I have got a car just means I have a car....
7
votes
4answers
3k views

“To correct” or “to correcting”?

Please tell me whether this sentence is correct. The first step to correcting a mistake is patience. I think that after to the verb must be in its infinitive form. Am I mistaken?
20
votes
5answers
583 views

Can “zero” be used to describe uncountable nouns?

“There was zero courage in this verdict,” he said. ”I think this goes to the jury not wanting to make a difficult decision." I learned that mass nouns cannot be enumerated. Yes, I know that zero ...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

Should there be a space before punctuation?

I often see questions, exclamations, or sentences written with a space before punctuation marks (specifically ,, :, ?, and !), but I usually see these without the space. Which is correct? Are both ...
10
votes
1answer
10k views

What is the meaning of “in” and “on” when they are used together?

I have never seen the prepositions in and on used together in any sentence. I cannot imagine what in out would mean in a sentence. However, I recently have seen this kind of usage, and I had ...
5
votes
1answer
10k views

“it wasn't” vs “it isn't”

Mom: Meggie, I let you put on your best dress this morning on one condition, that you didn't get it dirty. And look at you! Meggie: Mum, it wasn't my fault. Should the last sentence be "Mum, it isn'...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

It won't open vs it is opening?

I often see this phrase in movies and shows I am trying to watch TV and it won't work. The jar won't open; it is stuck. The alarm won't go off (even though I am setting it up correctly). My ...
5
votes
3answers
13k views

“got” vs. “have got”

Reg: What's that you have got Meggie? Reg: Show us. Meggie: No, she's mine! I got her for my birthday! Reg: We just want to have a look. Reg used the present perfect have got in the first sentence; ...
12
votes
1answer
5k views

Is it 'cold to touch' or 'cold to the touch'?

Do you need the article 'the' in the following sentence. Please explain. The gun felt cold to touch. The gun felt cold to the touch.
4
votes
1answer
162 views

Did the author forget to use 'if' or I'm missing some literary style [closed]

I completed reading a short novel "A Little Princess" written by Frances Hodgson Burnett. The servant, "Ram Dass" says the following while planning to change the protagonist's(Sara Crewe) room from ...
6
votes
3answers
16k views

What are those labels called that have a person's name in offices?

Is there a specific term for the labels used in offices and other places, which are mounted outside a person's office or cubicle and carry his name and other details?
6
votes
2answers
86 views

Deprecation or replacing

I co-manage a PtokaX based DC++ hub in my college.(Only relevant if you know what DC++ and hubs are) We had a script which registered a bot named Infobot to the hub. Since, those scripts were getting ...
4
votes
1answer
772 views

What does it precisely mean that the suffix -ship “denotes a state of being”?

Over two decades, she enjoyed a memorable and mystifying acquaintanceship with Ramirez. Does it precisely mean that the suffix -ship "denotes a state of being"? After having read that definition, I ...
2
votes
1answer
165 views

What word can fit better than “view” in this context?

What word(s) fit better than view in the following sentence? The System shall allow any restaurant to view the customers who have ordered meals from it.
0
votes
5answers
7k views

“His/her” or just “his”? [closed]

Should I use his or his/her in the following sentence? The user can determine his name.
8
votes
1answer
23k views

predefined or pre-defined? [closed]

Which of the following is the correct usage of the word, and why? The user can use pre-defined lists. The user can use predefined lists.
4
votes
1answer
258 views

What is a better word instead of “set” in this context?

I have this sentence The System shall allow customers to set their addresses. I think that the word set is not a good fit here. Would a word such as define, determine, or locate be better here? ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Why can't we use “to” after tell?

I said to him. I told him. Why can't we use to after tell, when we are using to after say?
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Correctness of “Which has best served” (present perfect)

I have this sentence: The system shall allow any customer to find the restaurant which has best served a specific food item. I want to say that there are many restaurants serving food items and I ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

Using 'supplement' as a verb

Recently I had to write an application letter, and when my teacher examined it; he marked the following sentence as incorrect (because of the supposedly wrong usage of 'supplement') I would like to ...
5
votes
1answer
7k views

“Excel in” or “Excel at”

Consider the following sentence: I have always tried to excel in/at courses relevant to veterinary sciences, such as physics, biology and chemistry. Which one is correct? A quick google search ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

What does “of working age” mean?

I have to answer the following question, and I don't understand what it means. Are you a dependent of a person who is or will be working in Canada and you're of working age? What does it mean by "...
14
votes
3answers
250k views

In a letter, what is the most polite way to ask for a quick reply?

If you're writing a formal letter, and need the other party to reply as quickly as possible, how can you do it in the most polite, eloquent fashion? No matter how I try to do it, it always sounds too ...
-1
votes
2answers
80 views

regarding “how you paid and how you get the ticket?” [closed]

Is the following conversation grammatically? Me: Have you bought the air ticket via this agency directly? Jack: I bought once. me: How you paid and how you get the ticket?
12
votes
2answers
2k views

pronunciation rules for words with spelling -th- /θ/ /ð/

Is there a rule to identify which is the correct pronunciation for words with -th- spelling (mother- think), this /θ/ or this /ð/?
4
votes
1answer
378 views

“ways to .. and to .. ” vs “ways to .. and .. ”

When should I write the word "to" twice? "ways to .. and to .. " When should I omit the second "to"? "ways to .. and .. " I want to ask a person "What are the best ways to climb over a wall?"...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

Can a sentence starting with “I think” be used to state a fact?

If I say, "I think I will take another portion of lasagna", does that mean I am going to take another portion of lasagna? Similarly, can the following sentence be used to state that Verona is my ...
4
votes
1answer
255 views

Can “no more” have a time-related meaning?

A. They are no more susceptible than any other team. B. Although we see no more insects, they own our woods. If I'm not wrong, "A" more is notionally different from "B" more due to the fact that ...
20
votes
4answers
62k views

Plural form of “brother-in-law” when a possessive case is involved

1) My brother's friend's opinions 2) My brothers' friend's opinions I hope "1" and "2" are pretty clear and correct. Now, let us suppose that the brother in "1" is a brother-in-law and that all ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

How to pronounce the American “em'” in “them”?

I just can't pronounce it properly.. How to pronounce the AmE's "em" in "them"? I always pronounced it like the "un" in "fun" or the "um" in dumb.
3
votes
1answer
40k views

What does “stark contrast” mean? [closed]

I was reading The Accidental Billionaires and I came across this sentence "...; the relaxed, almost rubbery way he leaned against the window - a stark contrast to his usual calcified, if slightly ...
13
votes
3answers
35k views

Where should the word “probably” be placed

Consider the following sentences: I'll move to the south by then probably. I'll probably move to the south by then. I'll move to the south probably by then. Which of the three is correct....

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