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3
votes
1answer
4k views

“Can you please do this?” versus “Can you do this please?”

What is the difference between these two phrases: Can you please do this? Can you do this please? Is the latter one (putting an extra emphasis on please), considered to be a less polite and a ...
3
votes
1answer
876 views

I forgave all of you

I forgave all of you. I forgave some bad thing that my friends did to me. Later after a month, I'm telling them the above sentence. Is this the way a native speaker will say?
3
votes
2answers
604 views

Is this reported speech?

I have another question regarding reported speech. Are these sentences some kind of reported speech? "I was told that she knows/knew the whole story." If I turned it around, I think I could form a ...
2
votes
2answers
779 views

How to talk about deceased people

I have a question regarding talking about deceased people and yourself at the same time. "My deceased husband and I have been close friends with the Jones ever since we met." I'm not sure if this ...
3
votes
1answer
32k views

Attached is a copy you've requested?

My friend wrote me this sentence and got me really confused. "Attached is the file you've requested." Is this sentence grammatically correct? Why isn't it "attached is the file you requested"? I ...
2
votes
1answer
11k views

Had heard/mentioned?

I was reading other questions and came up with a question regarding the usage of "had". So, does "had" signify past events or make phrases more polite? I've heard my friends say "I had heard" and "...
4
votes
1answer
72 views

Why is it correct to drop the 's in “a Jane Austen['s] fragment”?

A long time ago a user asked a question on EL&U with the following title: Meaning of a Jane Austen's fragment in this letter Another user edited it, dropping the 's, turning the title into the ...
7
votes
2answers
7k views

'User Manual' or 'User's Manual'?

I see the usage of both 'User Manual' and 'User's Manual' in daily life. I am wondering if both of them are grammatical and idiomatic? If 'User Manual' is grammatical, is 'user' used as an adjective ...
1
vote
1answer
157 views

“hand-dug well” or “hand dug well” [duplicate]

I'm writing a text about wells, some of them are dug by hand. On the internet I see many times the term "hand dug well" is used, but also "hand-dug well" and even "handdug well" are quite frequently ...
0
votes
1answer
766 views

“Recently he insured for” vs.“He insured recently for”

Recently he insured for / He insured recently for a mediclaim policy. As per my understanding the adverb should be placed as near as possible to the verb it modifies, so I think the latter ...
3
votes
1answer
210 views

Is it okay to lose the subject in formal writing?

In conversation we can talk like, Think you can do that? Or, Hoped you might find it helpful!! Here in the first sentence I excluded "You" and in the second sentence "I". I feel in both the ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Preposition “to” in “…accept the consequences of to…”

I'm doing a test from a Cambridge book. There's a sentence that reads like this: Children need to learn to accept the consequences of to their actions. Is the preposition "to" in above sentence ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Making phone calls with someone

I know you are supposed to introduce yourself on the phone by saying something like "this is so and so", but how do you introduce yourself when you are calling with someone? Do you say "This is A ...
0
votes
2answers
304 views

I have something (someone) in some place

For example: A) I have a book in my room. B) There is a book in my room. I want to express: I have a book, and the book is in my room. Which is more accurate? Is example A wrong? But it sounds ...
1
vote
1answer
787 views

frustrating, irritatingly

A kid is playing a game interestingly. His dad/mom asks him to stop the game immediately and read books. The kids says "Okay..,I'm coming" but with little bit upset and frustrate. What are the adverbs ...
2
votes
2answers
716 views

I'm running twenty four hours

I'm running twenty four hours What do you understand by the above statement? In my languages it means I'm very busy with lot of work 24 hours a day, no time to relax. But I don't see this sentences ...
3
votes
2answers
10k views

Graduated high school in top 10%?

I have a question regarding how to write your school grades. If you want to write someone saying that you graduated high school in the top 10%, should you write it like this? "Graduated high school ...
0
votes
1answer
138 views

Present perfect or not?

I have some sentences that I wanted to ask the experts here. When emailing people in present tense, do I have to use future tense in order to be grammatically correct? "You need to call me ...
1
vote
1answer
568 views

wind whips on the faces of the soldiers

A dusty wind whips on the faces of the soldiers. I see sentences like "the wind whipped their faces" But I'm not sure whether the above sentence is valid. I don't see any matches in google or ngram. ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

You're the light in my “deepest” hour

This is one of the verses in the song How deep is your love by Bee Gees. I believe in you You know the door to my very soul You're the light in my deepest, darkest hour You're my savior when ...
4
votes
1answer
620 views

Confusing mixing of tenses 2

I have more confusing sentences that were written by native Americans that seem to mix tenses. I'm not sure why these can be correct. We noticed that you have created a return label for this order. ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Describing chages in facial expressions

John wails. Mike controls John. John sobs softly. Suddenly, John's face turns into angry. What I'm trying to describe is the facial expression changes. John was sad and crying, and suddenly he get ...
2
votes
2answers
207 views

Confusing conditionals

I don't think these sentences follow the rules of conditional I, II, and III (but I could be wrong). Does that mean I don't have to stick to the tense agreement rule when using conditionals? If ...
3
votes
3answers
332 views

What verb should I use for somebody who thinks that what given as proof doesn't prove what it should?

I am looking for the equivalent of the Italian contestare; in particular, I am looking for a verb to use for a proof, which for me is not a proof at all, and that I would use in a sentence similar to ...
2
votes
1answer
819 views

Can “myself” be used as emphasis in the following sentence?

Can myself be used as emphasis in the following sentence, or is another word preferable (e.g. also, too)? I myself found difficult to believe to what she was saying, but then she gave me the proof. ...
3
votes
3answers
23k views

Is using 'yourselves' in this sentence grammatically correct?

Even among yourselves there will surely be differences and variances. Or should I use 'you' here?
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Is my usage of the colon in this sentence accurate? [duplicate]

From what I understand, one of the functions of the colon, among other things (introducing lists, direct speech/quotation etc), is to act as a link between two sentences. (A formal version of the ...
0
votes
1answer
275 views

Which of the two sentences is grammatically correct? Why?

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? Are both OK? The butler relayed to them Eugene’s instruction to use as little seasoning as possible. The butler relayed to them ...
1
vote
2answers
16k views

Do you have / Have you had something to eat'?

Consider these two expressions Do you have anything to eat? Have you had anything to eat? In the first expression I am definitely asking someone if he has something to eat. But in the second ...
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

What does “snap” mean in these sentences? [closed]

He dashed back across the road, hurried up to his office, snapped at his secretary not to disturb him, "On vacation in Majorca," snapped Aunt Petunia. "What did you say?" his aunt snapped ...
2
votes
1answer
339 views

Tense of noticing/realizing things

When you explain to someone that you realized or noticed something at a certain point, should the realizing or noticing be past perfect or simple past or present perfect? I emailed you because I ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

What is the meaning of this sentence?

Instead of that, he had just sailed over a party of friends from his own place on the Long Island shore. (Link to source) How do you analyze this sentence? Does he go to a party of friends from his ...
1
vote
3answers
307 views

“Removes her dress” versus “strips her dress” versus “sheds her dress”

Which one is correct? She removes her dress and dives in the pool in her underwear. She strips her dress and dives in the pool in her underwear. She sheds her dress and dives in the pool in her ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

What does “started westward” mean in this sentence?

Jim Ralston could always bring a friend home to dine without notice. The Ralston and Lovell wines rounded off the effect, and even Joe's drawn face had mellowed by the time the Lovell Madeira started ...
2
votes
1answer
8k views

What does saying a verb is “used with/without an object” mean?

This is a comment a poster made to someone on a discussion, Man, why are you hassling me so much this morning? I'm trying to open minds, bro I wasn't sure about the meaning of hassle, and when ...
1
vote
1answer
777 views

“Pretending like a dog,” “act like a dog,” or “imitate like a dog”?

John looks his son, pretending like a dog. John looks his son, acting like a dog. John looks his son, imitating like a dog. To make his son laugh, John acts/pretends/imitates like a dog. ...
6
votes
2answers
24k views

Meaning and usage of “good old”

Sometimes, some good ol' solitude feels good man. What does good old mean, and how do you usually use it in context?
2
votes
1answer
193 views

Is there a similar idiomatic phrase for “reading is great, love reading, read excellent books”?

"Reading is great, love reading, read excellent books." is a rough traslation of the famous saying "读书好 好读书 读好书" by Bing Xin, which is used to encourage Chinese students to read more. In this ...
3
votes
2answers
71 views

Is there an omitted relativizer?

From her [Joad’s mother] position as healer, her hands had grown sure and cool and quiet; from her position as arbiter she had become as remote and faultless in judgment as a goddess. She seemed to ...
4
votes
1answer
222 views

May I omit “do” in a dependent clause?

In a sentence like this: Many people realize that they didn't do any wrongdoings, so they cannot understand why they have to be punished. or Many ..., so they cannot understand why do they ...
2
votes
2answers
24k views

What's the difference between “replace” , “exchange” and “change”?

When I have a problem after purchasing something at the store, I'd like to take it back to the store and change it. These are two examples. One is that I bought a rug, but it didn't fit the space, so ...
2
votes
1answer
682 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? (in less than … since)

Is this sentence correct? The man died in less than a month since the start of his fast.
4
votes
1answer
674 views

How should I use “go + present participle”?

I read some activities are commonly expressed in English by "go + present participle." However, I found a sentence like "Let's go ride a bike!" and I am wondering which sentence I should use. ...
10
votes
1answer
555 views

Why is the subject omitted?

The class everyone had really been looking forward to was Defense Against the Dark Arts, but Quirrell's lessons turned out to be a bit of a joke. His classroom smelled strongly of garlic, which ...
3
votes
1answer
362 views

Should it be “staggered at” or “staggered by”?

I'm trying to say that the linguists were "astounded at his progress": The eminent linguists who were teaching him were staggered by his remarkable progress. They were the ones learning from him ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Are these two complements?

For one thing, when Seamus Finnigan asked eagerly to hear how Quirrell had fought off the zombie, Quirrell went pink and started talking about the weather; for another, they had noticed that a ...
2
votes
1answer
232 views

“corner caught against the coffee table”

This is a comment someone made about their dog during a discussion on dog tricks, Mines a lost cause, he had a cone on the other day because he was scratching his ear, and he tried walking over to ...
1
vote
2answers
189 views

Interpreting a Bertrand Russell piece

In "History of Western Philosophy" Bertrand Russell wrote "The Arabs, although they conquered a great part of the world in the name of a new religion, were not a very religious race; the motive ...
14
votes
4answers
33k views

“Is it proved that …?” vs. “Has it been proven that …?”

Searching The New York Times, I found 22,100 results for "is it proved" and, therefore, I argue that that phrase is likely correct English. But on History Stack Exchange a user edited the following ...
2
votes
2answers
454 views

What does “people whose tags of you” mean in this sentence?

Looking at Google+ settings I have found the following sentence: People whose tags of you are automatically approved to link to your Profile I don't understand how to parse the sentence, since "...

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