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20 views

grammar rules for titles of posts [duplicate]

When referring to America, one should use the definite article, "the", "the United States". However, in some titles of posts, the definite article is omitted. Is that some kind of grammar rule?
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1answer
25 views

“Actually, he's just…” or “Actually, he just…”?

A: How's it going with you and Toby? B: Great. Actually, he's just moved in with me. Can I say "Actually, he's just..." or should it just be "he"?
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1answer
14 views

Difference between “work at the table” and “work the table”

According to the Human Rights Campaign website, National Coming Out Day has been held every year for 30 years on the anniversary of the second March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights Oct. ...
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0answers
23 views

Someone else/another

They fight a lot. 1) Then let's hope she finds someone else soon. 2) Then let's hope she finds another boyfriend soon. 3) Then let's hope she finds herself another boyfriend soon. In this example ...
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0answers
30 views

Do native speakers say “you're way too late” in real life?

Google gives About 663,000 results for "you're way too late", some comes from lyrics, some are in a story. Do native speakers say it in real life? Imagine that, it's 8 o'clock AM. My son is still ...
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1answer
17 views

Put up at vs. put up in

Consider the following examples: 1. We put up at a hotel in the city centre. 2. We put up in a hotel in the city centre. To me, the first example sounds better than the second one. Can we use the ...
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0answers
13 views

meaning: Mr. Just About

Does "Mr. Just About" make sense as a nickname for someone who does not care about precision? I'd appreciate your help.
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2answers
36 views

the opposite of “Plain English”

Imagine that, Alice is writing a report for a news website ... With Femtosecond Laser, many kinds of ophthalmic diseases could be cured ... Michael suggests "Ophthalmic" sounds too professional ...
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1answer
19 views

Another usage of “from which” in this case?

...or like our young student, they have what is called a mental calendar from which they can pull details about almost any date. (The source: https://youtu.be/43JDG0E5k4U?t=212) Could the "from ...
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1answer
17 views

Should I add 'of' after gerunds?

Should I add 'of' after gerunds to introduce an object? For example, which one is correct: The advent of social media has had a huge impact on sharing information. or The advent of social media ...
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1answer
18 views

What's the grammar and meaning of the sentence “We're make it example on that one!”?

The source of the sentence "We're make it example on that one!": https://cnc.gamepedia.com/Twinblade One of the unit's quote
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3answers
54 views

“Jargon” vs. “Plain English”

A post says Bureaucratese is an informal term for obscure speech or writing that is typically characterized by verbosity, euphemisms, jargon, and buzzwords. Also known as officialese, corporate-...
3
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1answer
19 views

Long-lasting or Long-standing

My feeling so far is that "long-lasting" is more relevant when something that has a non-homogeneous, "dynamic" nature is distributed on the timeline, e.g. "long-lasting drop in sales", "long-lasting ...
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1answer
9 views

no one and no one else differences

She has no one else to look after her but me. She has no one to look after her but me. Which is correct? What is the difference between these two sentences?
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2answers
8 views

No one vs No one else usage

John is my best friend. No one likes me more than he does. John is my best friend. No one else likes me more than he does. 1) Which is correct? What is the difference between these two sentences?...
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0answers
9 views

would have done

In the following dialogue, why did Tom use the tense "would have made"? Can we say "would make" or other tense instead? Ann: So what time should we pick you up on Friday? Can you be ready by noon ...
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1answer
27 views

what does it mean when a name fascinates you [closed]

I just wanted to know out of curiosity because I was wondering and I did not know what it is so can someone please explain it to me I don't know because no one has told me
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1answer
55 views

If I am a future teller and made a prediction yesterday about something two days in the future, how do we use tenses here?

I happened to imagine this particular situation, which is quite unreal. But I am curious how we use verb tenses to describe the situation. Let's say I am future teller. I can tell the future. One ...
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1answer
31 views

Can you vs Can you maybe

Is there any difference in meaning between these following sentences? Can you maybe call him and tell him to meet us there? Can you call him and tell him to meet us there?
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1answer
9 views

Meaning of run into

What is the meaning of run into in the following sentence Officials have spoken of soldiers being outnumbered when normal patrols with the strength of a few dozen each on the Indian side have run ...
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1answer
18 views

Is “I do, so shall you” correct English?

Is "I do, so shall you" correct English? I feel like so, but when I google, I cannot find similar sentences, all I found are "as you sow, so shall you reap", but I try to see if the verb can be ...
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2answers
17 views

to be _ but _ structure

Elusive means hard to find or capture. I read a sentence in the newspaper today which was They were asked to go to Jhalwar on April 5 to be tested but proved elusive. I am confused in the meaning ...
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1answer
29 views

Does sequence of verb tenses also apply to phrasal verbs and multi-word verbs?

Does sequence of verb tenses also apply to phrasal verbs and multi-word verbs? Down below, we can see a phrasal verb in bold in each sentence. According to sequence of verb tenses, the subordinate ...
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2answers
15 views

Right form of verbs after certain verbs

I was taught that in English there is a rule that the subjunctive of verbs follows after verbs like suppose, assume, and so on. For examples, Suppose n be a number. Assume a fact be true. But I ...
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1answer
26 views

meaning of “curt”

A post says Gretchen McCulloch, an internet linguist and author of the upcoming book Because Internet, said OK is not inherently rude but the length of a reply matters. “Anything that’s ...
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1answer
16 views

Meaning of “we are the working out on earth of Freedom of Speech…”

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2001/07/truth-and-consequences/303149/ Analysts offer various explanations for the public's widespread contempt for the media. My own hypothesis is that ...
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1answer
27 views

should I use “should” when talking about grammar rules?

Consider these Wh-questions begin with what, when, where, who, whom, which, whose, why and how. Wh-questions should begin with what, when, where, who, whom, which, whose, why and how. The ...
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1answer
14 views
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1answer
12 views

Is there a word we can use to refer to big clusters of clouds?

Is there a word we can use to refer to big clusters of clouds, attached or unattached? I am thinking there might be a word, but I've never really heard of words related to cloud being used in any book ...
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0answers
10 views

his brother Pete

a. She came here with her mother**,** Jane McIntosh. b. She came here with her mother Jane McIntosh. Which of the above is correctly punctuated? I think, as she has only one mother, (a) is correct, ...
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2answers
29 views

Is the sentence “What social problems exist in big cities” grammatically correct?

An English class use this as the topic for students. What social problems exist in big cities Typically, to construct a wh-question, one needs to use an auxiliary verb, such as "do/does", which ...
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0answers
13 views

Educate your children to be happy (meaning)

I would like to know the meaning of the sentence "Educate your children to be happy." I wonder if one of the following meanings is correct. Teach your children so that they can be happy. Teach ...
2
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1answer
44 views

Is it true that the word “some” can mean two things?

Let's take the sentence "I ate some meat" for example. Am I correct thinking that it can mean two things, either "I ate some amount of meat", or "I ate some kind of meat, don't know which exactly it ...
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1answer
29 views

How's it going with…?

I want to ask my friend about how his relationship with a girl he's with is going. Are these completely natural: How's it going with Hannah? How's it going with you and Hannah?
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1answer
30 views

I’m not having any free time today

Can I say the below sentence? Is it correctly? I'm sorry I’m not having any free time today. Or are there other better constructions? TIA
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0answers
26 views

I was thinking or I thought

I was thinking, if you were interested, you could come over to dinner Saturday. I thought, if you were interested, you could come over to dinner Saturday. Does using "I was thinking" sound as a more ...
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2answers
34 views

Incomprehensible usage of 'being'

I can not understand the usage of being in this sentence He again protested about the work on the event of the planning being rejected by authority. How is being used? Please explain grammatically ...
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1answer
21 views

three-word compound adjective hyphenation

Which is correct Robotic assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy; or Robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy. Similarly also for, Robotic assisted medial and lateral meniscus repair; or Robotic-...
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0answers
27 views

When do I use a comma before a pronoun?

I'm writing a report about a book. One of the sentences reads "The Outsiders is a book written by Susan Eloise Hinton, who is more commonly known by her pen name of S. E. Hinton." At the word "who", ...
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1answer
32 views

Seventy minus one [closed]

I was watching a series and came across a dialogue which was, “I would love to “af you see kay” you in 70 minus 1”. What does 70 minus 1 mean here? Is it an idiom?
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2answers
31 views

What is the meaning and the grammar of 'which that'

I'm a foreign student who is interested in the book known as Alice in the wonderland. There was a conversation between Alice and the red queen in which the latter replied: "...but I've heard nonsense,...
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1answer
41 views

A term for a statistics in games

In some games there are statistic about how many times user have done something. Examples: Cookie Clicker: Cookies baked Cookies forfeited by ascending Legacy started Building owned ...
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1answer
20 views

False equivalence or false equivalency?

If you compared two objects that have a few commonalities but are essentially incomparable, would you call the comparison a false equivalence or a false equivalency? Like would you say comparing ...
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1answer
31 views

Confusion over using a gerund in a sentence [closed]

Is this sentence idiomatic? I was talking over phone during my visiting to the hospital. If not, why is it not idiomatic? I am using a gerund in a gerund clause after all.
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0answers
27 views

You're standing in a building & point to the glass window to refer to the space outside. Is it ok to say “There're more birds on this side”?

You are standing in a room on the 3rd floor in a building. You then point to the glass window to refer to the space on the left outside the building as showed in the picture. And then you say "There ...
1
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1answer
27 views

present continuous for a general statement: is it possible?

In fact i live in France but Scott (who lives in Australia) is such a nice guy that he is ok to let me use his address, so each record I buy in Australia is delivered to him, where they are waiting to ...
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1answer
18 views

“See (someone) back” is idiom?

Well, I guess you might think that, but when I saw it back then it was anything but boring! Am I right that "saw (someone) back" is idiom? Why is but used before boring? Maybe, it should be ...
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2answers
39 views

Confused over using sentences

I have heard people say I was talking over phone during my visit to the doctor. but is it idiomatic if I say I was talking over phone during my visiting to the doctor.
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1answer
17 views

“To get emotionally attached” VS “To be dependent”

I think "to be dependent on someone" can mean "to be emotionally attached / tied to that person." Though, I guess "to be dependent on someone" seems to cover a wider range of dependancies (like ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

But vs Except usage

She has no one to look after her except me. She has no one to look after her but me. Which is correct? My grammar book says sentence2 is correct. What is the difference between BUT and EXCEPT ...

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