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1answer
12 views

Could I remove “reference to” from “being informed by reference to”?

A Cambridge english Vocabulary says The vocabulary of English changes over time, with words being added and other words falling into disuse. In order to maintain its currency, the Preliminary and ...
1
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1answer
12 views

How to understand “those wreckers of all but the best laid plans” in this context

"I have been careless, and so have been thwarted by luck and chance, those wreckers of all but the best laid plans. But I know better now. I understand those things that I did not understand before. I ...
0
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1answer
26 views

“Despite the fact that” or “Even though” - Which is more stronger and emphatic?

I know that "even though" is more stronger than "although". The former "makes the contrast between the main and subordinate clauses stronger or more emphatic." I know they all are used to show ...
0
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1answer
33 views

In the sentence “I'm happy that you're happy.”

I came across this line; "I'm happy that you're happy" in movie. What does 'that' mean here? Does 'that' in here have the same meaning as 'when'? I in no way thought that 'that' would address this ...
0
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1answer
48 views

Does it feel natural to use 'several' to mean starting from 'two'? Can 'several' be 'two'?

My question is based on this post: Using 'several' and 'some' Anyway, my question is this: Does it feel natural for native speakers to use several to mean starting from two? Do you ...
-1
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2answers
27 views

“Meanwhile” Vs “In the meantime” Vs “At the same time”

I wonder which choice works and which doesn't work in each example and why? Jim went to answer the phone. ............., Nancy started to prepare lunch. a. meanwhile b. in the meantime c. ...
0
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2answers
34 views

Cutting tree into thin strips

Is the following sentence semantically correct The man cut the tree into thin strips. How can a tree be cut into thin strips? Its stem can be cut into thin strips.
0
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0answers
19 views

Meaning of safe water [on hold]

In the following sentence what is the meaning of the term safe water? The ship is being taken to safe water by the captain and not his crew. I found this sentence in my grammar book hence no other ...
2
votes
2answers
41 views

Why “told me” and not, “said to me”? [duplicate]

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald 1) Whenever you feel like criticizing any one," he told me, "just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had." ...
1
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1answer
27 views

Which is correct - “while chapaties are being made” or “while making chapaties”?

I have to change the voice of the following sentence Our mothers use tongs while making chapaties. I think its answer would be Tongs are used by our mothers while chapaties are being made. But ...
0
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1answer
19 views

Sentences/Verbs [on hold]

Are both sentences correct, and do they mean the same: a) "Tears SLIPPED DOWN my face." b) "Tears OOZED DOWN my face." In case they are both correct, which form is more commonly use?
3
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1answer
61 views

English Definite Article “the” with “Same”

I know we often use the English article "the" before nouns. But I have noticed this is not always true. According to the Oxford dictionary, "Same" is used as Adjective, Pronoun, and Adverb. Oxford ...
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2answers
19 views

When do we use “THE” before character name/nickname?

For example: Why do we use "Wolverine" not "the Wolverine" I want create character of the nameless man called Revenant. Should I use "Revenant" or "the Revenant"? Thanks in advance.
5
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5answers
786 views

Is it alright to say good afternoon Sirs and Madams in a panel interview?

I will be attending a panel interview (with two men and two women). I don't know their names. I want to be more polite, but I am not sure whether it is alright to say Good afternoon, sirs and ...
3
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2answers
43 views

Adjective or adverb before another adjective

I am aware that adjectives only modify nouns, while adverbs modify everything else (verbs, adjectives and other adverbs). However I'm experiencing some difficulty identifying these two expressions ...
0
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2answers
19 views

play snowball / have a snowball fight

A colleague of mine said there is no such thing as "playing snowball" in English. In my native language, when we talk about "snowball", we use it with the verb "play." I wonder playing snowball ...
0
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1answer
29 views

With or without a preposition?

Certainly, it is not as easy to learn to read and spell English as it is most other phonetic languages. from Uncovering the Logic of English: A Common-Sense Approach to Reading, Spelling, and ...
-1
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2answers
32 views

What means “veteran bores”

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald "In consequence, I'm inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me and also made me the victim of not a few veteran ...
1
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2answers
18 views

We're having a party on his birthday VS for his birthday

I know 'for' can be used as "on the occasion of" or "at the time of", so what's the difference between the two sentences in each group? 1A. I'd like make an appointment with the doctor for 11 o'clock ...
0
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1answer
24 views

…followed by (Function)

...The construction with "of" seems to be the most common, followed by the one with no preposition, and then by the ones with "in" and "at" . The funeral is at 3.00, followed by a reception at ...
0
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1answer
34 views

“Opposite to” Vs “Contrary to”

Based on all my researches and what I know myself, the words: "contrary to" and "opposite to" are not exactly the same like many other English synonyms! Opposite is when a word or thing means exactly ...
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2answers
51 views

Difference between “in six years” vs. “for six years”

What is the difference between the two sentences? I have not played hockey in six years. I have not played hockey for six years.
-1
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0answers
10 views

When you are doing something despite your inner feelings / personal interest

I am looking for a quite polite or rather formal phrase / expression to use when I want to say: "Although I don't want to...(the negative statement; e.g. don't want to go,) but (the positive ...
0
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2answers
98 views

Is “to infinitive” a myth?

Let us observe the following examples I want to speak to you I am looking forward to seeing you I am interested to learn English In the sentence 1 we say "to speak” is a to infinitive and to as a ...
0
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2answers
20 views

Is it correct to say “I fell off my bike while riding with my friends”?

What I want to say is: I fell off my bike. I was riding a bike with my friends. => I fell off my bike while riding with my friends. or => I fell while riding a bike with my friends. Which one is ...
1
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1answer
22 views

“ species ” or “ species' ” or “ species's ”?

In an example used for describing the meaning of the word "biodiversity" in Cambridge dictionary the phrase "species habitat and biodiversity" is used: the number and types of plants and animals ...
1
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1answer
27 views

Dangling modifiers

Sitting on the edge of the chair, a scorpion bit me I know that it is an example of dangling modifier because it is not clear who is sitting on the chair, the scorpion or me. It may be modified as ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Does “should not confine [something to something] alone” mean “should look around more”?

A Cambridge english Vocabulary says The list does not provide an exhaustive list of all words which appear on the Preliminary and Preliminary for Schools question papers and candidates should not ...
-1
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0answers
11 views

Question Tag Have to [closed]

I have a question, when I use have to in a sentence do I use mustn't or don't as the question tag. Thanks in advance Wiesy
0
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1answer
11 views

How do I read “off of” naturally?

He brushes a lock of hair off of my cheek. Either I should make a break between "off" and "of" or read them linked "offov"?
0
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0answers
12 views

How do I read “don't take” in a linked way with American accent?

I don’t take too kindly to people telling me what to do. I'm aware of the rule for double t of reading in linked way -- t t turns to d. But here I think "don't take" turns to "don't dake" would be a ...
1
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2answers
63 views

“illuminate the issues at stake” meaning

One of the examples used for the meaning of the word "illuminate" in Cambridge dictionary is: to explain and show more clearly something that is difficult to understand: an article which ...
5
votes
5answers
242 views

What would be synonyms for “be into something”?

I find myself repeatedly using these two expressions; "I'm into Psychology" or "I'm interested in Psychology" but cannot think of other ways to deliver the same meaning. What other expressions ...
0
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0answers
18 views

What preposition should be used with “course”?

What is the right preposition for the following sentences: Did you learn about things like that in\on your course. He is in\on the math course at college. I'll meet you in\on\at the course.
2
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1answer
30 views

how to distinguish between different uses of present perfect?

1- Complete the following exercise : I live in New York now ,but I ___________ (live) in Mexico for many years The answer is "lived" as my grammar book mentioned, But why? ,Since we use the ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

which sentence is correct

my friend made a statement to which I replied " After 2 weeks you won't have the same say " now I don't know if that sentence is correct I think " after 2 weeks you will not have the same opinion " is ...
0
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1answer
18 views

up to my satisfaction or to my satisfaction

Which sentence is more correct? My English is good but not to my satisfaction. My English is good but not up to my satisfaction. Or is there any other better way of saying the same thing? And is ...
0
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2answers
27 views

Does the phrase “in a way” makes such a difference in a statement?

Does the phrase "in a way" makes such a difference in a statement? In other words, is there a major difference by saying: "In a way, a part of you thinks they should have been together." and "...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

What means: “Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn.”

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald This sentence: "Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn." I don't understand because of words: "unaffected scorn" because of ...
0
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2answers
18 views

Is it idiomatic and grammatically correct to say “these are just basic math”?

Is it idiomatic and grammatically correct to say "these are just basic math"? When looking at a bunch of math scribbles on a chalkboard, is it correct to say "These are just basic math"? I did so one ...
0
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1answer
17 views

What Marge says about Giant's Causeway?

I have seen the following video, where Marge and Family go to the Giant's Causeway. I don't fully understand what she says, even if I slow the playback speed. This is the video: https://www.youtube....
0
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1answer
29 views

to ask for vs to ask

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/common-verbs/ask-and-ask-for says that "to ask" is used for questions and "to ask for/to" is used for requests (the 1st with nouns, the 2nd ...
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2answers
26 views

Can the verb 'break' be used for 'wall'

Can the verb break be used for wall? As in the following sentence: Why did she break the garden wall?
0
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1answer
20 views

What do you think is the best way to learn English properly?

I has studied with a grammar book and read and listened many contents in internet (ex: Youtube, news in English ) since I started English. I know there is no shortcut in learning language. But I ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

When would you vs when you would in a sentence

Which is correct: Please let me know when WILL YOU go. Please let me know when YOU WILL go. Also: I don't know when would he arrive. I don't know when he would arrive. Please explain why. Thanks! :...
0
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1answer
17 views

What is the difference between “his participating” and “his participation”?

I don't understand the difference between each of the following pairs. Example 1 A: My boss encourages his participating in conferences. B: My boss encourages his participation in conferences. ...
0
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1answer
18 views

Is there any idiom that means “go ahead with something”?

Is there any idiom that means "go ahead with something"? I thought about "giving oneself the green light", "get a jump on something", but the first one is contrived and the second one means something ...
1
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3answers
36 views

Verb with as if

In my grammar book I found the following. He walks as if the whole Earth belonged to him. And it says that second form of verb is used with as if But at many places I have found usage of first ...
-1
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0answers
16 views

Can anyone answer my question please . What means ( to be closed to ) Thanks in advance [closed]

Can anyone answer my question please . What means ( to be closed to ) Thanks in advance
0
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1answer
26 views

Which is correct: “John was born after…” OR “John had been born after…”?

Is it correct to say: John was born decades after the death of his grandfather. or John had been born decades after the death of his grandfather? I remember learning that "had been" was a relative ...

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