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12 views

Future Perfect with time adverbs/clauses : which action came first

I'd like to know which action came first in those sentences. Even though I know the future perfect references the first action, because of the time adverbs/clauses,I don't know which action came first....
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1answer
21 views

Does “By country” mean “come from those countries”?

A wiki post uses "By country" when talking about "Syrian refugees" Does "By country" mean "come from those countries" there?
1
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1answer
19 views

At the enemies or at the enemy

The French used this tactic at the enemy. This tank as a special machine gun that fires 1000 round/s at the enemy. Should we use the plural "enemies" or is "enemy" fine? Why is that?
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0answers
14 views

aid + to infinitive vs. aid + to gerund

Is there any subtle difference in meaning between them? "The computer is an aid to keeping costs down." "The computer is an aid to keep costs down." I think the former is preferred, but the latter ...
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0answers
18 views

Does “official” mean governor or officer in some situations?

A Financial Times post says China has asked officials to stop mentioning its premier programme to recruit the brightest tech talent from overseas, after growing suspicions over the scheme from the ...
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0answers
27 views

Is the phrase “factor is because” a little bit wordy

An IELTS learning material website gives this response for question "Why did you choose that job" To be honest, I make a choice of this job with two main reasons. At first, I am in love with ...
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1answer
15 views

What is the difference between these two future conditionals?

If you lend me some money I will start a business. or, If you will lend me some money I will start a business. What is the difference between the meaning of these two future conditionals?
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1answer
16 views

What does “points of friction” mean in this sentence?

What does "points of friction" mean in this sentence? Q: Are any of the points of friction which you read about in the Introduction & The Origins of the Cold War: U.S. Choices After WW2 ...
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1answer
24 views

Are going to give me/will give me/are giving me

A: It's your birthday soon. Do you think... you'll get some good presents?/you're going to get some good presents? B: I already know what my mom and dad… are going to give me./will give me./are ...
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0answers
24 views

What does this sentence mean “I am seriously considered resigning”? [closed]

Is this sentence correct? "I'm seriously considered resigning" What does considered resigning mean?
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1answer
22 views

What does “humbling enterprise” means?

So I've got this sentence while watching a video: "Astronomy is a humbling enterprise to pursue." What that means? https://youtu.be/9W3RsaWuCuE?t=3
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1answer
17 views

Is it natural to use past tense here?

all. Is it natural to use past tense "asked" after "so we were talking…" or should I use "ask" instead? I met with three of my best friends earlier today. We meet once a month to chat. As girls do. ...
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1answer
35 views

“Capital letter”, “uppercase letter”

If you're teaching someone to read and write. What is the most common way to say... a "capital letter" or "uppercase letter". Which would be the difference between them.
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1answer
22 views

the difference between 'stretched off' and 'stretched out'

Could you explain what is the difference between 'stretched off' and 'stretched out'? stretched off Outside the train endless fields stretched off, broken by an occasional farm building. ...
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2answers
64 views
+50

Do we use past tense in a subordinating sentence when talking about a thing that a non-specific person might have done in the past?

When we use when or if or any other subordinating conjunctions (unless, because, and once, etc) to talk about a thing a non-specific person might have done in the past, do we use past tense? Example ...
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1answer
14 views

Does this sentence say something specific, or is it ambiguous?

I read this sentence and found it to be confusing: According to NAME, there is an ongoing shortage of forensic pathologists working in the United States, with about 500 currently employed and a ...
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0answers
25 views

Addressing the probability of a category as a whole

Assume that we have a bag of candies, 10 candies, 6 of them square, 4 of them circle. You shall pick a random number between 0 and 100, and I will give you one of the candies by that number. You don'...
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2answers
37 views

A is to B what C is to D

NABBING A DISEASE hotspot is to epidemic control what locking up a serial perpetrator is to crime investigation. Can I change it to below, and which one is right? What nabbing a disease hotspot is ...
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1answer
28 views

Do adults speak this way “I want to allow all refugees”?

Some English-learning tutorial gives a sentence ... I want to allow all refugees Does it sounds like children's talking, e.g. "I want this", "I want that". Do adults say things that way in real ...
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1answer
32 views

Difference between “begin” and “start”

I have a gap-fill exercise in which begin and start are given: _By the time I got to the cinema, the film (1)____. _ As soon as they (2)_____ to explain, other people told at them to be quiet. ...
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0answers
10 views

Much vs very usage [duplicate]

He is much interested in the project He is very interested in the project. What is the difference between these two sentences?
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0answers
20 views

“attract somebody to do something”

As per Cambridge Dictionary, the usage of "attract" is: attract sb to sth They are trying to attract more holiday-makers to the area. Is it grammatically correct to use "attract sb to do sth"? ...
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1answer
19 views

“than compared to” or “than that of” in comparative?

I got stuck by the following sentence, which can be found here: If we generate the column proportions, we can see that a higher fraction of plain text emails are spam(209/1195 = 17.5%) than ...
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0answers
23 views

Using (of) or (in) with the word “member”

Actually I find it hard in a lot of occasions to know when to use "in" and when to use "of". One of those cases comes with the word "member" as follows : 1- He is member in the group of math. 2- ...
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0answers
15 views

Why is the Past Perfect in this sentence? [closed]

"She will trust her mother's judgment in this as she had always trusted it in all things". This is from a book. Why is the Past Perfect used here? This is the reason why she will trust her mother, so ...
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0answers
36 views

I am nothing in front of you

I hear the expression" I am nothing in front of you or I am nothing before you". Are the above two acceptable in native English speaking countries in the meaning of " in no way I can compare with you"...
3
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1answer
74 views

What does “you a stranger” mean?

I was reading a book and I noticed a strange sentence for me. "It was brave of you to help Arthur - and you a stranger". What does "you a stranger" mean? Is it a shortened "you are a stranger"?
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0answers
14 views

Conjunctions 'like' and 'as' after the verb 'look'

Is the use of 'like' correct in this sentence? The horse looked like it was running. Or here should be as (as if).
11
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6answers
4k views

Why is there one P in “hoping” and two P's in “hopping”?

Hoping is the present participle of hope. hopping is the present participle of hop. Hoping has only one p while hopping has two. What difference does it make? Why is hoping not hopping? Edit: I ...
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0answers
16 views

Do I am going to watch and I am watching have the same meaning?

I would like to know if this two sentences below have the same meaning or not. I am watching a movie tomorrow. I am going to watch a movie tomorrow.
14
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1answer
2k views

“the US.” or “the US”

When I said "in my field, people earn triple in the US. for the same work in China." a native speaker told me I should have got rid of that ".", is it a more modern style to refer to America?
3
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1answer
34 views

It's not due “in” tomorrow

I stumbled across this sentence while reading a book: It's not due in tomorrow. it refers to a piece of homework. After looking up the word "due" in several dictionaries, I suppose "due" means ...
0
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1answer
14 views

Grammar and Meaning in Context

During the lock down period when students couldn't go to school, I watched a number of clips all recorded by EFL English teachers encouraging students to take part in online classes. The content of ...
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0answers
13 views

Suppose [something] than [something]?

In given text I don't understand what does than belong to. Suppose? If not, and if it belongs to any more, then what does any more means in this context?
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0answers
23 views

The meaning of “He ripped out a fathom and a half o' brimstone Spanish,”

'"Why, Sim!" he says. Just like that--after twenty year! "Sim," he says, "what brings you?" '"Pudden," I says, not knowing whether to laugh or cry. '"You told me to bring cannon-shot next time, an'...
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0answers
32 views

Is “public image” a common phrase to refer to something like public “ego”?

As per Cambridge Dictionary, "ego" means your idea or opinion of yourself, especially your feeling of your own importance and ability That's how someone think themselves are. For example, Tom ...
2
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1answer
28 views

“the situation” vs. “a situation”

Consider the following sentences "brain drain" refers to a situation in which large numbers of educated and skilled people leave their own country to live and work in another one. "brain drain"...
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0answers
32 views

“go to university” vs. “go to an university”

consider these Michael went to an American university last year Michael went to America to go to university last year Michael went to an American university to started to get a degree ...
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0answers
10 views

Placement of commas in certain phrasal enumerations

I am gonna burn your house, and then smash your car and maybe steal your dog. I am gonna burn your house, and then smash your car, and maybe steal your dog. Which one is correct? Do we place ...
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1answer
13 views

Parallelism structure

If you were to add up all of the people who have some psychiatric disorder, struggle with depression or suicidal thoughts, have been subjected to neglect or abuse, have dealt with tragedy or the death ...
2
votes
1answer
303 views

“there grew a feeling”

There are 837 hits in Google Books that use "there grew a feeling". Learning those, I made up this: Last year I seldom go home because of work, there grew a feeling that I didn't care about my ...
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1answer
14 views

Trend of or trend for in the academic graph

I want to write an introduction about this graph: Are these sentences correct and have a good structure ? “The graph gives information about the percentage of recycling trends of four different ...
3
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2answers
61 views

“they were perfectly normal, thank you very much” – what is the thank you for?

from "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone" Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. what does "thank you ...
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0answers
22 views

Which one is correct: “a three-hour journey” or “three hours' journey” [closed]

The village we visited was __________ from our hotel. a three-hour journey three hours' journey
 a journey’s three hours the journey for three hours 
 the three-hour’s journey Answer ...
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1answer
10 views

a house Up For Sale

A post uses this title Harry Potter’s On-Screen Home At Privet Drive Up For Sale What does "up" here mean? Does it mean "ready"?
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1answer
12 views

I want to know whether the sentence which I am mentioning below is right

I want to know whether the sentence which I am mentioning below is right It's a humble request kindly give a Leaving Certificate of the School.
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1answer
21 views

Should I use past perfect in this sentence?

Should I use past perfect in this sentence? I've come up with three options: I forgot to add them on Sunday, so I added them today. I've forgotten to add them on Sunday, so I added them today. I ...
2
votes
1answer
20 views

a term to refer to “take away part of their salary”

In my company, employees should work from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm, 5 days a week. My company buys employees insurance, provides stock options to employees and pay wage monthly and had never been delayed. ...
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0answers
14 views

“There is a tear on her face”

How do I describe this? Is this one clear? "There is a tear on her face"
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0answers
22 views

meaning of “proceed to”

Per Cambridge Dictionary, "proceed to" means to do something after you have done something else Consider these Alice sat down and proceeded to tell bob about her skiing holiday. Alice sat ...

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