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1answer
20 views

Do these two sentences mean the same thing

what is the difference between "I am sorry to bother you again and I am sorry for bothering you." Do they mean the same thing because again implies that it is not the first time the person ...
0
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1answer
19 views

Is it “glowed” or “glown” when conjugating “glow”?

I want to say he's glown with brilliance but the spell checker barks at me for misspelling, like if it prefers glowed. This resource commands the latter, while this one the exact opposite. I've also ...
0
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3answers
19 views

Taking pauses while drinking

When we take a drink, we pause after taking a certain amount, usually a mouthful of this. What are the pauses called? Supposing X is drinking something. He took some of this, and stopped five times in ...
1
vote
3answers
20 views

Can I use 'prior' without 'to'?

Can the word 'prior' be a substitute for 'earlier', that is not followed by any clarifications in expressions like 'four years prior' (and then goes a period, the sentence stops)? Like '[he did this]. ...
0
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0answers
23 views

How could the following sentence be paraphrased

The harsh reality is that any settlement is going to require the return of some portion of the occupied territories,” Mills said, noting that return of occupied lands is one of the core principles of ...
0
votes
2answers
22 views

Most South Asians have a Toyota/Toyotas

Most South Asians have a Toyota/Toyotas. All of them have a red car/red cars. It put a smile in their face/faces. Both of them have a baby boy/baby boys. In these sentences I'm not sure if I should ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Running short of something [duplicate]

The phrase running short of something means when you don't have enough of something, but I want to mention how much of something I am running short of for example I want to buy a pair of shoes the ...
0
votes
1answer
7 views

Usage of “this time so…”

The following is an excerpt from an NYT article: In 1996, Mr. Lee was convicted of bribing the country’s president, then pardoned. More than a decade later, he was found guilty of tax evasion but ...
0
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1answer
21 views

Is “if rain wouldn't come,” grammatically correct?

I would like to ask if the two following expressions are correct; A) If rain wouldn't come, I could go on a picnic. B) If rain didn't come, I could go on a picnic.
0
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1answer
13 views

Is it called “the ledge/ edge of a flower enclosure”?

In front of houses or buildings people have these structures like the one in the above picture. There is an enclosure and flowers are planted in there. What is the edge of that enclosure called in ...
0
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1answer
24 views

What does “led by” mean here?

Does it mean "organized by Redpoint Ventures" or "Redpoint Ventures invested the most money in this startup"? The company recently wrapped up a $3.5 million seed round led by ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

How to describe word formatting changes automatically and unexpectedly?

How to describe word formatting changes automatically and unexpectedly? Sometimes when we use another PC to open a word file, formatting changes automatically and unexpectedly due to word version ...
0
votes
1answer
12 views

What is the appropriate answer to this clause?

Woman: Hi, how’s your new job going? Man: I’m trying to ____ with the fact that expecting a perfect job is unrealistic. A. bring it on B. get the news C. say to myself D. come to terms I'm very ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

How should I understand the “lumbar” joke in this context (from Modern Family)?

This scene below is from a tv series Modern Family. Cam caught Jay(father of Mitchell) at a mall being harsh on his stepson, Manny, who was struggling to move an inch at a not-so-tall indoor climbing ...
1
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2answers
19 views

Independent clauses and sentences are one and same?

I am learning phrases and clauses and one definition says that independent clauses and sentences are same. Is it true? E.g. He ate dinner. Is it both a sentence and an independent clause? If so, ...
-2
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0answers
28 views

'hardly few' - Which does 'hardly few' means, many or few or something else?

I want to know exactly what the following sentence means. Hardly does the boy take few chances to distinguish between what he does and who he is. Please let me know if 'the boy' has many ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

“Sometimes” vs. “Occasionally”

I am building a survey. I found one that uses this scale for asking about frequency of doing something: Very often Sometimes Occasionally Rarely Never I want to change it to: Always Sometimes Rarely ...
0
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2answers
21 views

''I can pick you up on the street''?

I know that we can say: 'I can pick you up from the station' Can I say like this (see below) if I mean the following: 'I want you to wait me on the sidewalk of the street'. 'I can pick you up on/in ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Is it For increasing interchangeable by To increase in this context?

Is it possible to interchange for increasing by to increase without affecting the readability of this paragraph? Taking into consideration that she has served in her region as a teacher in the local ...
4
votes
3answers
185 views

arose with such larks as were abroad at the moment

From the beginning of chapter 10 of The Just Men of Cordova (1917) by Edgar Wallace, the author was describing someone, saying: But he certainly lived like a gentleman, as all Somers Town agreed, for ...
0
votes
2answers
20 views

Why do we use “to” in here?

I am not a native English speaker. I am an undergraduate student in ELT. This is my first year, and I confuse sometimes. So my question is this: "Review the beliefs of Victor, Sweet, and other ...
1
vote
1answer
14 views

Is the usage of nonetheless in the below sentence correct?

I have written the below sentence. Panicked that his presence had been exposed, by his own folly nonetheless, Diego immediately jumped in the cover of the tree. The sentence here is supposed to mean ...
0
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3answers
42 views

“Both” for three items. Is it really impossible? Is there an alternative?

In Russian: По той причине, что мне нужен стиль и для обычного текста, и для текста внутри таблиц, и для сносок, использование стиля Text Body вводило бы в заблуждение. Here is how this passage ...
0
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0answers
28 views

Past perfect tenses in compound and complex sentences

Consider the following sequence of events. My smartphone starts behaving weirdly. On a Friday, I send an email describing the problem to the customer care of the manufacturer of my smartphone. The ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

If I found two $5 bills on the ground, would it be acceptable to say “$10 are on the ground”?

If I found two $5 bills on the ground, would it be acceptable to say "$10 are on the ground"? Is "Two $5 bills are on the ground" the ONLY acceptable sentence?
1
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1answer
18 views

To be overwhelmed by vs to be overwhelmed with

Are the expressions TO BE OVERWHELMED WITH and TO BE OVERWHELMED BY interchangeable? or is there a difference in meaning?
0
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0answers
25 views

Is it too long this phrase to be used without a comma?

I am wondering whether I could put a comma in any place in order to reduce the length of this text? Is it too long this text to be used without a comma? This acknowledgment must be complemented with ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

The current paper is the completion of the first paper

I have submitted a paper to a journal. One of the reviewers is asking me what is the difference between the current paper and a previous paper I've written. In the 2nd paper I have completed the work ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Usage “reason for the” or “reason of the”?

When you want to know why someone is requesting for something when writing an email, which should be used? May I know the reason of/for the request? Is there a difference between the two? Thanks.
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Is the clause “I ever have” in the sentence “the best gift I ever have” grammatically correct?

I am hesitant whether the sentence "the best gift that I ever have", is appropriate for expressing that the gift that will be given to me in the future (might happen or might not) will be ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

in what = which?

Washington has barred companies worldwide from manufacturing chips for Huawei, the telecoms business, in what is a potential death sentence for its affiliate HiSilicon, China’s largest chip designer. ...
0
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2answers
31 views

How would you fill out the blanks in this document? “Done at …”

I am applying for a scholarship and I must fill out this page. I've never seen "Done at" phrase before. And, also at the beginning, there is I......... country........................date of ...
0
votes
2answers
34 views

Using perfect forms for ''for''

So, the rule I have been taught is that 'for' and 'since' must be used with perfect forms, i.e. I have been living in London for 3 years/since 2017. This presents two problems for me: 1.- What if the ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Is it correct to say “don't force the bottle closed/open because the threads of the cap and the bottle don't align well with each other”?

Sometimes, when we screw / unscrew a cap on / off a bottle, the external male thread of the neck of the bottle doesn't align well with the internal female thread the cap. And As a result, the cap ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

What does “at the individual scale” mean in this context?

Our special series “Out of Work in America” tells the stories of unemployed Americans in their own words. For this project, The Times’s National desk collaborated with 11 local news organizations in ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Should I use “the” before “IoT”?

I wanted to know should I use "the" before "Internet of things" or "IoT" in sentences? For example, in this sentence: It is an important issue in ... IoT network. ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Is it natural to say “tuck in the flaps of the medicine box to close it”?

Medicine or pills are often stored in boxes like the above picture. Is the above box called "a pill box" or "medicine box"? And to close the box, we have to fold its flaps in a ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Please teach me what these sentences mean

It wasn’t that she looked as if you could have given her shillings—it was impossible to look less so. Yet when she finally drifted toward him, distinctly handsome, though ever so much older—older ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Is it natural to say “squeeze the toy chick to make it hiss” and “shake the toy chick to make it flash”?

I have a tiny rubber toy chick like the above picture. When I squeeze it, it makes some hissing sound. When I shake it, it flashes or blinks Is it natural to say "squeeze the toy chick to make it ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

Why does “elite” rhyme with “beet” rather than “bite”?

Why is "elite" pronounced /ɪˈliːt/ (rhyming with beet) and not /ɪˈlaɪt/ (rhyming with bite)? Most words that end in ite are pronounced with /aɪ/ — lite, trite, site, etc. — but elite is ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

What is 'Looped' railing?

This is the only description about it. Looped railing : These loops are as beautiful as they are solid. What is 'Looped' railing mean?
0
votes
1answer
24 views

How should I parse this sentence?

IEEE 754-1985 section 7.4(Underflow) says After rounding - when a nonzero result computed as though the exponent range were unbounded would lie strictly between K(which is some value). The following ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

What is the correct preposition to use after “sign up”?

For example: The boy faked his age to sign up in certain websites. The boy faked his age to sign up to certain websites. The boy faked his age to sign up for certain websites. Which one is correct? (...
0
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0answers
10 views

Title of my proposed research paper [duplicate]

I'm asking if the title of my research paper is fine, it's entitled "Psychological Impact to Students Using Modular Learning Modality During Covid-29 Pandemic."
0
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3answers
640 views

Meaning of two expressions from a BBC article: “cheesy leftovers” and “taste buds”

As the Brexit goes to virtually non deal Brexit recently, I am currently reading this article from BBC. First question: The headline has this Post-Brexit trade: Pricey wurst and cheesy leftovers I ...
1
vote
1answer
20 views

What's difference between “to be concerned with”, “to be concerned about” and “to be concerned for”

I found phrases to be concerned with and to be concerned about in my textbook, and it says that there is some difference. But I don't understand it for now so I would be thankful if anyone explains ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

What do you call the painted image done on a car?

What do you call the painted image done on a car? I think there's a specific terms used by people who do the paint job for custom cars, but I can't remember what it was.
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Is it correct to say “Sweetie, don't stretch the neckline all the way to show off your shoulders like those girls on TV like that”?

Some young women wear some special type of tops like the above picture. The top could be a sweater or Tshit or any top can be made into it. What is the common term for it in everyday conversation, for ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Is this called “a display stand with a base”?

Note that: The information on the panel could show menus of a restaurant as the above picture. Or, it could show some instruction that you often see in university or school. Or, people may put some ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Sea creatures (not fish) that have the suffix 'fish'?

I think of two sea creatures of which their names end with the suffix 'fish': Cuttlefish, shell-fish, although by definition they aren't real fish. Are there more names of sea creatures (which aren't ...

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