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*As* he finished his speech, the audience

As he finished his speech, the audience burst into applause. Doesn't "as" suggest the two actions happened simultaneously? But they could not happen simultaneously. The audience applauded as soon as ...
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0answers
4 views

What does “spin-off” mean in this context?

Below is from "Dare to be Lazy" by Rolang Barthes I remember this image: When I was a child, Paris was different. It was before the war. It was hot in the summer, hotter than it is now; at least it ...
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0answers
4 views

Favor to someone vs. favor for someone

What's the correct option? maybe both are correct? Example sentence: It's not a favor for/to me, but for/to you. I found both on the net: "Actually, not a favor for me but for Libby." Source. ...
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1answer
8 views

“What letter?” in a title and in a question

If I title a worksheet "What Letter?", am I reducing the grammar too much? It's a worksheet for 5 year old ESL learners. So, obviously, I don't want to confuse them with a full sentence. But I also ...
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1answer
13 views

How to tell the stress of a word and what do commas mean in IPA?

/ˌmiːdɪˈəʊkə/, /ˈmiːdɪˌəʊkə/ These two pronunciations differ only by apostrophe and comma. What do these signs mean and where can I listen to this difference? And another question about IPA - how can ...
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1answer
15 views

adverb between the verb and object

From bbc If the verb has an object, the adverb of manner is usually placed after the object, not between the verb and object. A post says "Lovely" and "wonderful" mean pretty much the same ...
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0answers
11 views

Is it 'separatist-controlled territory' or 'separatists-controlled territory'?

Is it 'separatist-controlled territory' or 'separatists-controlled territory'? There're, at the same time, 'five-year-old (child)' and 'rights (group)', different patterns. I understand that 'right (...
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2answers
10 views

Sleep - countable?

So my first assumption is, of course, that you have to say "I had little sleep", but so many people say "I had a little sleep", and I can't understand why "sleep" becomes countable all of a sudden. Is ...
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1answer
9 views

“want to figure out” vs. “work on figuring out”

I am preparing for IELTS test, in which advanced words and expressions get higher score. consider this I have been wanting to figure out the meaning of that math term. Is the meaning of the ...
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0answers
12 views

as exhausting and strange as the trip had been

I have the text: As exhausting and strange as the trip had been, Kate seemed to love getting to know the missionaries and their families. Which is correct, 1 or 2: 1) Kate seemed to love getting ...
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2answers
24 views

“in my office” vs. “at my office”

consider the following sentences last night, I had a meeting in my office last night, I had a meeting at my office At the office or in the office clearly says both of them are correct. Do ...
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1answer
29 views

Is the sentence correct or shortened?

Let's look at the sentence. He doesn't want to see me win. Is it shortened? Is it correct grammatically? I think the sentence should be as follows. He doesn't want to see me to win. or He ...
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0answers
7 views

worked at (the) production planning department

Is the necessary when we talk about in general but at the same time specifically mentioning a department as follows I have worked at the production planning departments of various manufacturing ...
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0answers
4 views

Just there: where it was possible

I want to convey a simple idea that works in my native language, but I'm not sure about English. I looked at Linguee and its sense is always simplified/omitted in the translations into English. “...
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1answer
16 views

context for “Testify”, “Justify”, “Verify” and “Certify”

From wordreference "Verify x is correct" - test and confirm x is correct. "Justify x is correct" - explain why x is correct. "Certify x is correct" - issue documentation to say x is correct. "Testify ...
1
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1answer
19 views

When calling a company in the united states, how do you start a conversation?

How do you initiate the conversation? Should you use the phrase "How are you?" after or before introducing yourself? I assume it is after you introduce yourself? "Hi, this is ... calling, how are you?...
1
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1answer
11 views

What does the phrase “space-warping portals” mean here?

Please help me figure out the meaning of the phrase "space-warping portals" in the following sentence from the description of the game "Levelhead": Play through hundreds of user-created challenges, ...
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0answers
19 views

meaning of “leave home” in different areas

From Cambridge Dictionary If you leave home, you stop living in your parents’ home. leave the house or leave home? verifies this usage. whereas, go to work at a specific time uses "leave home" ...
2
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1answer
25 views

“boroughs” vs. “districts”

Google and some other guys use "boroughs" when talking about the administrative divisions of NYC: keywords: how many boroughs in nyc Whereas some post uses "districts" when talking about the ...
1
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1answer
11 views

'to do' or 'to make' a problem?

Which word is more idiomatic with a problem, to do or to make? I don't like to do/make problems for people.
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0answers
14 views

The word 'pass' in this context, works?

My friend had a blood test, and afterwards he told me: "everything is ok, thank you. Just a little bit unpleasant". Can I tell him, "Don't worry, it'll pass." meaning that this unpleasant feeling will ...
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0answers
13 views

Can I say “go in the direction the voice came from”?

Let's say When I walked in the park, I heard a cat was meowing. So I tried to look for that cat. I'd like to explain this situation like "I went in the direction the voice came from." Does it make ...
1
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0answers
12 views

Metaphorical reference to someone bad to doing good and being praised more than a good person

I'd like to point out the following phenomenon that frequently occurs in the daily life. Take a mischief, culprit, someone unreliable and well-known to be a lousy piece of manure. Basically a bad ...
2
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2answers
18 views

how to use the noun “edit” correctly?

Merriam-Webster defines edit as an instance or result of editing Google the term "edit meaning" gives the following definition of edit a change or correction made as a result of editing ...
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1answer
17 views

when would I say “I'm having a hard time believing”?

This is a question in a practice. I guess this is the answer I'm having a hard time believing as he says about Jenny. My actual question is, what the situation could be when a speaker would say ...
2
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1answer
16 views

Question tags in sentences with “let”

Let them stay here What is the correct question tag for this 1) will they? 2) will you? My grammar book is suggesting first question tag, but I think second is correct. Please, help me with ...
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2answers
24 views

What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences?

He went on to talk about pollution vs. He went on talking about pollution
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0answers
18 views

meaning of “critical errands”

From cnet As coronavirus lockdown restrictions ease and cities reopen around the world, the way you'll go to restaurants, malls and hair salons will change, so it's a good idea to think about how ...
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0answers
16 views

Is it better to use There are or Where are?

In this sentence is it better to use there are or where are? There/Where are more gamers, so it's market for the....
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0answers
11 views

meaning of “but one of”

From Collins Dictionary But is used to mean 'only' Orbit is but one of the sculptor's striking creations. The meaning of the whole sentence seems to be "not only" instead of "only". The ...
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2answers
42 views

“The meanings of A and B are pretty much the same” vs. “The meaning of A and B is pretty much the same”

The words "lovely" and "wonderful" are synonyms. So, should I say The meanings of "lovely" and "wonderful" are pretty much the same or The meaning of "lovely" and "wonderful" is pretty much the ...
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2answers
17 views

If you paid attention, you’ll do well

As I was watching The Affair, I came across a dialogue which seems poor English to me. The dialogue is spoken by a person who is a native American in the series. The dialogue is as follows: If you ...
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0answers
22 views

difference drop/come by

There's this pizza place right next the supermarket. Me and a few friends hang out there every Friday after school. You should drop/come by sometime. What is the difference between these in this ...
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0answers
26 views

Using 'What' As A Relative Pronoun

I have an issue where some ESL students frequently use 'what' in sentences like this i.e. 'It was the first cake what I tried.' (I always prefer 'that' to which in sentences like this.) I at first ...
3
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2answers
24 views

I have worked in/at/within (the) x industry for a while

I would like to ask which preposition should be used with the word industry in an example as follows. I have worked at/ in / within the tourism industry for a while. Is the necessary or does it ...
1
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1answer
24 views

“to be” or “be” that is my question

Does this grammar structure fit here? Nanotechnology is to develop further, as its positive aspects cannot be denied, but be treated with extreme caution. Nanotechnology is to develop further, as its ...
1
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2answers
55 views

Is there a word for large group of horses? [closed]

Is there a word for large group of horses? I know there's "flock" for birds, but I am wondering if there's a similar word for horses and land mammals.
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1answer
11 views

too and either usage differences

A: I don't like oranges. B: I don't like oranges either. This is the right way to express this idea. question 1: But why can't it be written like this: B: I too don't like oranges. question ...
2
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2answers
96 views

What does “lock in” mean here?

Does it mean Prevent? https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/lock-in_1?q=lock+in+ “The biggest lesson we learned from the global financial crisis was to not abandon stocks ...
1
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2answers
23 views

For a simple stroller, the cloth seat can be easily removed from the frame. Would you say “to take the cloth seat off or out of the frame”?

For a simple stroller, the cloth seat can be easily removed from the frame. As shown in the picture, the cloth seat has 2 long holes on its sides. To put the stroller together, people will slide the ...
0
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1answer
13 views

“in three days” VS “For three days”

Can anyone please explain the difference between these two sentences 1) I've not slept in three days. 2) I've not slept for three days. I hear people using the both sentences. I'm just curious if ...
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2answers
21 views

What does “if we thought about it” mean?

"Ordinarily we believe that other human beings are conscious, and almost everyone believes that other mammals and birds are conscious too. But people differ over whether fish are conscious, or ...
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1answer
19 views

Neither - Nor vs Don’t- And [duplicate]

Alex likes neither candy nor cake. Alex don’t like candy and cake. What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences?
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2answers
16 views

What does 'opening storyline' mean in this sentence?

Today I was studying my physics textbook and this sentence shows up "....filling the tank of your car in the opening storyline with gasoline." I can't seem to understand what it means. Google says ...
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0answers
14 views

What is the difference between following? [duplicate]

Walk to Walk over/up to Do they mean the same thing? I've noticed walk to is used for place And walk over/up to is used for people
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0answers
28 views

What's the most normal/ regular/ usual/ common/ ordinary word to describe something not special?

What's the most natural way of saying the opposite of "special" in the contexts listed below? The word I'd use the most naturally is "normal" but one of my teachers said it's not the best choice, ...
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3answers
27 views

The word “patient” can be used for the people who are cared for by caregivers?

Is it possible to use the word "patient" for the people who are cared for by caregivers or the people who are in need of nursing care? If not, what do you call those people?
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1answer
26 views

Does this sentence follow a common pattern?

[About a blocked up sink] Of course if Tom was home he'd put it right in a moment. He loves anything like that. He's ever so good with his hands, Tom is. Is this final "Tom is" a normal thing people ...
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0answers
15 views

Present continuous to express future arangements conditionally

I was taught that we can use present continous to express future that has been arranged. For example, "I am staying home today". Today, I stumbled upon on the following example: "I am staying in ...
1
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1answer
21 views

Knowing how to wield regular expressions unleashes processing powers you might not even know were available

Knowing how to wield regular expressions unleashes processing powers you might not even know were available. What does it mean? to me, it is "you might not even know the fact that processing powers ...

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