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Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
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Answers answers:3 (3+)
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Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
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Results tagged with Search options user 10081

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the several possibilities available for a particular meaning, and which one of them would be the most appropriate.

0
votes
Usually, very tells us "to a significant extent/degree" (in the opinion of the speaker). On the other hand, so tells us "to such an extent/degree", and originally meant something like "in this manner …
answered Oct 29 '15 by Epanoui
3
votes
I'm an American native speaker. For "Thank you." I often use these: "You're welcome." "I'm happy to help." "No problem." (Informal, and can sound a little arrogant in some situations, but it really …
answered Mar 29 '17 by Epanoui
0
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Stating that you strongly believe acknowledges that it's your belief, as all knowledge is ultimately. Both express much certainty but 'positive' allows for no doubt while 'I believe' hints at the ide …
answered Sep 4 '14 by Epanoui
1
vote
Yes. It sounds a little more formal, but just the "to" form (often called the Infinitive of Purpose) is a bit simpler and easier to understand in a long sentence with many parts.
answered Mar 29 '17 by Epanoui
6
votes
You can say: Have a look at this link: Take a look at this link: Check out this link: I do not recommend simply saying "Check this link.". I sometimes read this written by a non-nativ …
answered Apr 4 '17 by Epanoui