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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 113

For questions about noun phrases that contain no articles, definite or indefinite.

1
vote
We'd better go by (!) taxi—if we can get (a) taxi at such (an) hour as 2 a.m. Why no article here? That's just the way the preposition works. by (prep.) using a particular method of transpor …
answered Jun 4 '14 by J.R.
0
votes
It’s perfectly normal speech; the zero article is often used in this manner. One oft-seen example is the phrase man against man – which is considered a form of literary conflict – but the expression m …
answered Mar 31 '18 by J.R.
5
votes
Let S be a set of integers. Now which of the following sentences are correct: The set S contains ... Set S contains ... S contains... None of those are grammatically incorrect, but I p …
answered Feb 18 '14 by J.R.
7
votes
It depends on the context, and you've provided too little of it for a definitive answer. Grammatically, there's no reason an article must be included after the phrase due to. For example: We can …
answered Jun 21 '17 by J.R.
3
votes
The first sentence probably is from a larger news column or book, where some specific school is being discussed. As for the second sentence, forget that silly notion which says the definite article …
answered Mar 2 '17 by J.R.
16
votes
Because you are talking about the lions in the NY zoo, you should use the article. (Otherwise, your sentence makes it sound like you are talking about all lions at all zoos.) As for the accounting ex …
answered Mar 29 '17 by J.R.
2
votes
Long into night wouldn't be ungrammatical, but it wouldn't be idiomatic either. The Ngram is quite interesting; it shows the prominence of one but confirms the occasional usage of the other, such as …
answered Mar 30 '16 by J.R.
7
votes
When both options are acceptable, it's very hard (if not impossible) to tell which would "look better" without larger context. To me, they both mean the same thing, however the emphasis is slightly …
answered Aug 23 '13 by J.R.
6
votes
When talking about counting down until some specified time, it's rather common to omit the article. That's why you'll see phrases like: 10 seconds until liftoff 8 days until Christmas …
answered Dec 28 '15 by J.R.
5
votes
That sentence by itself would read just fine as: The Justice Department argues that a merger with American would prompt US Airways to shift more travelers to higher-priced flights at American’s la …
answered Aug 23 '13 by J.R.
-1
votes
Let's put the phrase into a larger context. Case 1 Have I ever told you the story about James and Susie? I might begin a storytelling session in that way. I would use the word "the", because I'm th …
answered Apr 7 '14 by J.R.
2
votes
Are these two phrases acceptable, if so, is there any, subtle or explicit, difference in meaning or emphasis between them? 1) The readers of a magazine 2) Readers of a magazine Are they …
answered Apr 7 '14 by J.R.
2
votes
I agree with you and your tutor – but mostly with you. I agree with your tutor, because I'm not sure I would declare: How is the number 5 written in the Roman numerals? to be incorrect. Howe …
answered Dec 19 '18 by J.R.