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Results tagged with Search options user 11567

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the several possibilities available for a particular meaning, and which one of them would be the most appropriate.

5
votes
The word "race" carries a host of (usually negative) connotations in English as well, and in the wrong situation you can cause a commotion with it. Unfortunately it is the only word we've got that re …
answered Nov 3 '14 by Jason Patterson
1
vote
For something simple like clothing, there really aren't any dedicated nouns for an unwanted feature. We might use any number of adjectives meaning "forbidden" in certain contexts, but none consistent …
answered Jul 26 '17 by Jason Patterson
2
votes
When you want to state that an action was done on purpose, the two words are very closely synonymous and nearly always interchangeable. I personally use deliberately when I want to say that someone n …
answered Dec 26 '14 by Jason Patterson
5
votes
For orange juice, which is usually sold in jugs or cartons and dispensed into smaller portions of uncertain volume, "some" is probably the choice that your test was looking for. Unfortunately there a …
answered Jan 26 '15 by Jason Patterson
3
votes
In American English, any of several prepositions work here. They're either going to describe the position of the cap relative to the bottle or the possession of the cap by the bottle. I've lost t …
answered Aug 23 '15 by Jason Patterson
4
votes
Both versions would be correct grammatically and idiomatically, though I personally prefer which. Which is generally used when selecting from a number of items in a group. Here we are choosing fro …
answered Jan 12 '15 by Jason Patterson
4
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Typically investigation is followed by of or less commonly into. On is used even less often, though I have seen it before. I think that the headline would read more naturally with "Investigation Of …
answered May 24 '15 by Jason Patterson
2
votes
Import is rarely used to mean "significance" outside of formal/academic writing. Importance is used for this purpose in nearly all cases. This isn't simply a difference between casual conversation a …
answered Jun 2 '15 by Jason Patterson
9
votes
In daily conversation you would say poop or poo in American English. Excrement is used when talking about feces (the AmE spelling) being disgusting and filthy. Feces is usually used to describe it …
answered Nov 9 '14 by Jason Patterson
1
vote
"Axis of work" is not a commonly used phrase at all, nor is "strand of work," though it would be possible to define those phrases in context and use them. More common phrases would be: One of th …
answered Mar 1 '16 by Jason Patterson
4
votes
The use of glean has a lot to do with its historical meaning, which involved impoverished peasants collecting leftover grains of wheat from the ground by hand after a field had been harvested in order …
answered Aug 22 '15 by Jason Patterson