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Results tagged with Search options user 11894

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the several possibilities available for a particular meaning, and which one of them would be the most appropriate.

0
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I had always been perplexed as to why the day commemorating the worst day in recorded history would be qualified as good. But synonyms of good are virtuous, righteous, or commendable. Good Friday is t …
answered Nov 15 '14 by JimM
1
vote
Both prepositional phrases are correct. If someone calls you, & asks, "Where are you, right now," answer, "I'm at home." Some office furniture looks attractive in the home. at home is specific. You're …
answered Nov 18 '14 by JimM
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vote
Either eventually or ultimately is correct. If the statement is preceded by the progressive steps leading to the crash, I'd use eventually. If the statement is by itself, or mostly unrelated to previo …
answered Jun 20 '15 by JimM
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'To use' would be the most structurally correct, since it's being compared in preference to the infinitive, 'to interact'. However, it's totally permissible to compare an infinitive to a participle. ' …
answered Nov 12 '14 by JimM
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Concerning the capitalization, the capitals should be consistent. '-- substances like Calcium, Sodium, and even H2O' would be used in a scholarly report. '-- substances like calcium, sodium, and even …
answered Nov 13 '14 by JimM
2
votes
1answer
How does one decide whether to use who or that? In the title example: The correct pronoun is who. The correct pronoun is that. Either is correct. They're interchangeable. It depends on the context. …
asked Jun 5 '15 by JimM