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Results tagged with Search options questions only user 12430

This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

0
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1answer
I found the following sentences as some of the sentences that confuse a lot of ELL, and I, as a part of them, would like to understand them correctly. "He didn't do nothing." Means that he did …
asked Apr 10 '18 by Judicious Allure
1
vote
1answer
What is the difference between "there is no" and "there is not" (the same question for "there are no" and "there are not"? For example: There is no an apple on the table. versus There is not an apple on the table. …
asked Mar 27 '18 by Judicious Allure
1
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1answer
Are the words "intrigued" and "curious" are simply synonyms or there are different uses for each one of them? For example: "I was intrigued about the event yesterday morning." Vs. "I was …
asked Apr 13 '18 by Judicious Allure
2
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2answers
I'm trying to understand if the both sentences are correct, and if they are, what is the difference between them. Her mother is more modest than her. Her mother is more modes than she is …
asked Apr 24 '18 by Judicious Allure
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1answer
Are "next to", beside, and "near" synonyms or there is a difference between them? For example in the following sentences: 1) The refrigerator is next to the window in the kitchen. 2) The … refrigerator is near the window in the kitchen. 3) The refrigerator is beside the window in the kitchen. Based on my search I really didn't find an difference between such sentences. I want to …
asked Mar 11 '18 by Judicious Allure
3
votes
1answer
How should I say: Why there is only one student there? or Why is there only one student there?
asked Mar 27 '18 by Judicious Allure
0
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1answer
What is the difference between ‘I wish it to be clearly understood’ and 'I wish it is clearly understood'? The second sentence was taken from Oxford dictionary - 2.1, and it is not …
asked Apr 7 '18 by Judicious Allure
8
votes
5answers
"I'm going back home" Vs. "I'm coming back home" Assuming that both sound natural and are commonly used in speaking, is the difference between them that the first sentence is …
asked Sep 4 '18 by Judicious Allure
4
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5answers
What's the actual difference between "fire" and "flame"? Based on Cambridge dictionary: Flame is a stream of hot, burning gas from something on fire: Fire (material that is in) the state … , they cannot be used interchangeably? because when I'm thinking about it, I don't necessarily find an difference between them, it's allegedly the same thing, therefore I don't understand why we say "cool flame" rather than "cool fire". …
asked Sep 11 '18 by Judicious Allure
0
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1answer
Is there a difference between "also" and "too" in the following sentences? or it's just a matter of style? If it is just a matter of style what's consider more colloquial and what's more formal? a) This product has two colors too. b) This product has also two colors. …
asked Apr 25 '18 by Judicious Allure
1
vote
1answer
What is the difference between: There is a banana there. and There is one banana there. In both sentences it seems that the meaning is the same, if "one banana" equals to "a banana". …
asked Mar 10 '18 by Judicious Allure
0
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2answers
is the difference between the following sentences: "I should be given 9 euros but you gave me 10 euros." "I had to get 9 euros but you gave me 10 euros." What are the difference between these two sentences? …
asked May 17 '18 by Judicious Allure
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1answer
What is the difference "each" or "each one" or "each of them" or "each one of them"? For example: "Cells can be classified into two main groups: prokaryotic and eukaryotic. Each (or each …
asked Apr 21 '18 by Judicious Allure
0
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1answer
What is the difference between "Who does this course fit for" and "To whom does this course fit for"? And are they build correctly? My purpose is to ask to which people this course fits (but I'm not sure if the word "fit" is correct in that context) …
asked Jan 15 '18 by Judicious Allure
0
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1answer
If someone tell me that he's back home ("I'm back home now") does it mean that he's coming back home now or it means that he's already at home after some time that he wasn't there?
asked Sep 5 '18 by Judicious Allure

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