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Results tagged with Search options user 13999

An Article is used before a noun to indicate if the noun is something particular (the) or a member of a class (a/an).

1
vote
The first article is unnecessary, since "changes" is plural, but is needed in the singular "food chain". If one is picky, it might be better to use parallel construction and have them both plural: if …
answered Aug 13 by DrMoishe Pippik
0
votes
English does not always require an article before nouns. Specifically: Proper nouns, e.g. "I'm going to France." [But "I'm going to the Philippines," is correct for the plural.] President, in this c …
answered Apr 7 '15 by DrMoishe Pippik
3
votes
Both are correct in colloquial English. One uses pain as a countable noun, e.g. a pain in my arm and a pain in my leg, the other as uncountable, which, like water, does not require an article. It's …
answered May 26 by DrMoishe Pippik
2
votes
It is any one of many songs until it becomes just ours. Afterwards, it would make sense to say, "That is our song." Note the word that'd, short for that would, in the hypothetical future.
answered Mar 18 by DrMoishe Pippik
1
vote
Both are acceptable. Use of the article a makes it generic, in the sense of like the type of person that Trump is. The implication is you are talking about Trump's behavior. Without the article, it m …
answered Jul 27 '18 by DrMoishe Pippik
0
votes
Perhaps an example would help: Give me a book to put under the table leg. There is no specific book I need, just one of the right thickness, so use the indefinite article. Give me the book i …
answered Oct 14 '18 by DrMoishe Pippik
0
votes
Rules of grammar hardly apply to headlines and titles, which are telegraphic speech or even more abbreviated.
answered Dec 4 '18 by DrMoishe Pippik
0
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Since the conversation is about a particular movie, the definite article is appropriate, though "a" might be used in certain context. The statement is incorrect that any knowledge on the part of the …
answered Sep 22 by DrMoishe Pippik