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This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

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Subject + auxiliary be + used to + verb + ing I wasn't used to drinking wine when I first came to Greece, but that's changed now. I am used to drinking wine at lunchtime. I was used to drin …
answered Jul 17 '13 by Mari-Lou A
2
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First of all in English, we don't normally say we know some knowledge. Instead it is far more common to say that "we have some knowledge" in a particular field or subject. Google Ngram illustrates th …
answered Jun 3 '16 by Mari-Lou A
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When attack is a noun, the preposition on is preferred with locations, e.g.; attack on Pearl Harbour attack on Fort Sumter attack on (a) French church South Korea, US to simulate attack on nuclear …
answered Sep 21 '16 by Mari-Lou A
4
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To explain your student the difference in meaning, compare the following Where was she? Where is she? Question no.1 refers to a particular time in the past, the speaker does not know where …
answered Mar 1 '16 by Mari-Lou A
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it will continue to rain for sometime (and will likely continue to do so …). For the difference between Present Perfect and Present Perfect Continuous, I warmly recommend that the user reads the …
answered Oct 31 '16 by Mari-Lou A
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I did that online exercise and these were my answers The answers for 1-4 are in the past simple tense What _____ (happen)? happened Someone _______ (be) in the house. was They _________ (take) …
answered Dec 26 '16 by Mari-Lou A
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It would be odd to say I am suing for children I am suing XYZ for children It could mean a number of things: I am suing because I want to obtain "children" as payment. sue for somethi …
answered Sep 22 '16 by Mari-Lou A
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(a) The film was a real rubbish. NO (a) This car is a rubbish. NO (b) This car is a lemon YES The word rubbish is an uncountable noun, you cannot count "rubbish" individually. The corre …
answered Aug 19 by Mari-Lou A
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The following examples are different ways of saying something is in the right color. That color matches your pants. It [the shirt] matches your pants. The colour of this shirt goes with your trouser …
answered Sep 22 by Mari-Lou A
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Present participles are formed from verbs, and are often used to form verb tenses or adjectives. They can be used with an auxiliary to form the present continuous tense: “We are dancing” or used as an …
answered Dec 21 '16 by Mari-Lou A
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I have been told that 'you look good' is the perfect compliment to give. Because 'you are looking good' is not colloquial. In order for the phrase “You are looking good” to be really colloquial, …
answered Dec 17 '16 by Mari-Lou A
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"Will" is often used for making predictions about the future Some basic English grammars attempt to simplify the future "tense" by saying that "will" should be used when you introduce an opinion with …
answered Jan 5 by Mari-Lou A