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Results tagged with Search options user 2020

Modal auxiliary verbs are a special type of auxiliary verb, used mainly to express ability, likelihood, permission, and obligation. These include 'will', 'would', 'can', 'could', 'shall', 'should', 'may', 'might', 'must', 'ought', 'need', and 'dare'. Please do not use this tag for the non-modal auxiliaries 'be', 'have', or 'do'.

8
votes
Wouldn't is probably the correct word to use here. "From that day, she wouldn't talk to me" means that she stopped talking to me on that day. The phrase "from that day" implies that she has never tal …
answered Jul 17 '13 by Tanner Swett
2
votes
I'm assuming that you're asking about how to contradict a "should" sentence by using the word "should" again, like this: Person 1: "Daniel should go to the conference." Person 2: (ungrammatical) …
answered Aug 15 '18 by Tanner Swett
28
votes
In general, "should not" and "need not" have significantly different meanings. "Should not" indicates that it is bad to do a particular thing. For example, you should not drive a car too fast, becau …
answered Jun 15 '17 by Tanner Swett