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Results tagged with Search options user 21189

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about what a word means. If the question is about the meaning of a word that can't be understood outside its phrase or sentence, the "meaning-in-context" tag should be also used; for the meaning of a phrase, use the "phrase-meaning" tag instead.

7
votes
In short, yes. To understand this, you must consider the context. In this scene, if I remember correctly from the movie and book, Mark Watney (the main character of the book) is giving his rover a te …
answered Dec 22 '15 by Alex K
7
votes
something. Let me clarify this, as the specific meaning depends on on who the subject is. If this were about a friend from school, then "was out today" brings images of being out around the campus …
answered Dec 7 '15 by Alex K
4
votes
"Watch yourself" has a more negative air about it. It isn't something that I would use kindly. It has a connotation of almost sassiness, and so could even be considered rude in some contexts. A kind …
answered Aug 19 '16 by Alex K
1
vote
Because I am a musician, the first thing that comes to mind is stage fright. However, this generalizes to any case where a person is easily upset, frightened, or made nervous. So a musician could sa …
answered Dec 8 '15 by Alex K
3
votes
I can see why you'd be confused here. The boat being low to the water would look like this (excuse the poor drawing - this is the extent of my drawing abilities): This, in contrast, is a boat that …
answered Nov 11 '15 by Alex K
1
vote
Maybe this will help you ... to come (to be) at the hands of ... This is basically the meaning. It means that it will be done by whosever hands you say. So in your quote: I expected his …
answered Aug 12 '15 by Alex K
5
votes
Of course, the meaning of these simple(r) statements depend a lot on context. However, "I don't like it very much" is typically used as a polite way of saying that you really don't like something … doesn't have to mean that she hates it. But it certainly implies more than the literal meaning of slight dislike or even light like. It's basically a nice way of saying that you don't like something …
answered Dec 18 '15 by Alex K
3
votes
If you looked at the dictionary definitions, you may find that they are similar, but the connotations that they carry differ. To me, this is a fragile object: It looks like it needs to be handled …
answered Dec 22 '15 by Alex K
1
vote
It's not a super common construction, but the meaning becomes clear in the context. The speaker says, . . . the Tatars are not leaving. We will stay . . . [they have tried] to move us on … meaning is "get us to move" in this context. Again, I don't think that this is a common construction. According to Google Ngram, it's pretty rare (0.000000500%). …
answered Dec 23 '15 by Alex K
2
votes
In short, the ones that are correct are all the same. They all look like this: As an American having lived in various parts of the country, I can safely say that "brake light" isn't used AT ALL …
answered Dec 16 '15 by Alex K
3
votes
The two phrases imply slightly different things. If my coworker showed up to the meeting, then he was probably supposed to be there; I had been expecting him. However, if my coworker showed up at the …
answered Jul 7 '15 by Alex K
5
votes
A literal fight is physical, and a metaphorical fight is more debate over policies. To give you a concrete example, you can take a look at what has been going on in the Ukrainian parliament. A couple …
answered Dec 22 '15 by Alex K