Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 3187

Use the idiom tag for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about set phrases with unusual meanings that can't be properly understood just from the separate words in them.

1
vote
The question is tricky! The word in concern is welcome. The origin of the word is wilcuma in Old English. This means Wil (pleasure) and cuma (guest). The word has been used to show getting some kind …
answered Jul 19 '14 by Maulik V
2
votes
on the ground here means the place/thing in concern. It could be anything, the company, the business or things the like. OALD describes it: on the ground - in the place where something is happen …
answered Aug 1 '14 by Maulik V
8
votes
Oxford explains it: Think nothing of - Consider (an activity others regard as unusual, wrong, or difficult) as straightforward or normal. In other words, when you do something unusual without th …
answered Jan 9 '14 by Maulik V
-1
votes
The simple meaning of this phrase is... Live every moment of life because you don't know what is going to happen on the very next moment. Life is uncertain and it may end anytime without givi …
answered Apr 25 '14 by Maulik V
1
vote
Firstly, let's look at these idioms: (The idiom) 'snoop around' action is intentionally done in order to find something secret or something about someone's personal life. The Free Dictionary …
answered Jun 17 '14 by Maulik V
1
vote
Used as a singular noun, we can certainly use in the lead that way. This said, your sentences in the given contexts are okay. TheFreeDictionary talks about it: You often say that someone is in t …
answered Sep 23 '14 by Maulik V
2
votes
Working socks off means to work very hard to achieve something or finish the task. to work [someone's] socks off - to work very hard In your example, it means you are working very hard and the …
answered Mar 4 '14 by Maulik V
0
votes
In my opinion, a proper way to say this is ... He's a great person/student. He's one in a million. Here, the idiom one in a million means -nearly unique; one of a very few. Note that you can al …
answered Aug 29 '14 by Maulik V
3
votes
Quick/fast learner is the most appropriate term you can convey the message without any ambiguity. Nevertheless, apt pupil, sharp, quick-witted etc. are quite close to the term. Another term (a singl …
answered Feb 18 '14 by Maulik V
7
votes
rains? What has beating the bush to do anything to come to the point? Why a tail would wag the dog; how is it connected with the organization? But if you study those idioms, you'll find that they not only perfectly fit in the sentence but also add great flair to the sentences. …
answered Nov 17 '15 by Maulik V
7
votes
The noun 'blues' refer to 'sad' feeling. This could be due to anything -laziness, no interest etc. It has nothing to do with the color 'blue'. If you have blues, you feel sad. The commonest use is 'M …
answered May 20 '15 by Maulik V
3
votes
It's a very informal usage of the idiom in AmE. bite me (very informal) - used to say to someone that they have made you feel angry or embarrassed. I don't think it's an old expression. So, if y …
answered Apr 22 '14 by Maulik V
3
votes
The sentence is utterly ungrammatical. There are many ways to say that. I'm not in the office after the noon. I'm here till afternoon, then I'm on leave I'm on a half day leave, post lunch (t …
answered Oct 29 '14 by Maulik V
-1
votes
Agree with Damkerng and I too expect a noun after describe as. Nevertheless, if you use being, it suggests a little bit of their efforts of being that!. In other words, whenever we describe someone …
answered Mar 6 '14 by Maulik V
0
votes
If you are talking about the idiom, the FreeDictionaries says that both are correct. fall on one's knees and fall to one's knees means - to kneel down, usually in respect.
answered Dec 21 '15 by Maulik V

15 30 50 per page