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Results tagged with Search options user 40646

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the several possibilities available for a particular meaning, and which one of them would be the most appropriate.

0
votes
"At this point in time" and its relatives have been so mindlessly over-used, especially by government functionaries in England, that the late Gavin Lyall mocked the tendency in The Crocus List, one of …
answered Dec 17 '16 by MMacD
4
votes
In that particular case (talking about a living creature) "above" would sound "warmer", though both are grammatically correct.
answered Dec 13 '16 by MMacD
0
votes
The two words certainly have different meanings. "Inform" takes his perspective, in the same sense that "deliver a lecture" takes the teacher's rather than the students' (for which reason I always, …
answered Dec 13 '16 by MMacD
-1
votes
You're overthinking the problem and adding complexity where no complexity is needed. 1: cat 2: dog 3: sparrow 4: car ...is random. There's no way for you to create a mnemonic for it because the n …
answered Apr 27 '17 by MMacD
0
votes
Drop the "which is reflected", use "rules" rather than "rule", add "to" after give, and you're good. "Which is" serves part of the same function as "in that": they both lead into the same explanatio …
answered Apr 27 '17 by MMacD
14
votes
"Catch cold" is the canonical form in the US and Commonwealth countries. "Get cold" means something quite different, though the argument can easily be made that if you get cold you may well catch col …
answered Dec 14 '16 by MMacD
0
votes
"Had" places the event talked about completely in the past. "Have" might mean there are still implications for the present: "I'll show you the shoes you had never seen before the dog used them a …
answered Apr 27 '17 by MMacD
2
votes
A USAian who recalls old tv series, or who wants to evoke such a memory, could use "mass quantities". That would probably trigger for anyone over 50, and possibly for anyone over 40 (re-runs). For m …
answered Jan 7 '17 by MMacD
2
votes
The questions are all about the completed past (nothing carrying on into the present), so your answer must be, too. But you need not use the perfect; any past will do. You had to be there Yo …
answered Dec 30 '16 by MMacD