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A pronoun is a word that is used instead of a noun or noun phrase.

5
votes
Language is changing constantly as we can see in the case of the accusative or object form "whom" (question word and relative pronoun). In colloquial language "whom" has vanished. The m has simply be …
answered Aug 29 '15 by rogermue
-1
votes
In my view the use of "it" is in a way that the reader stumbles and really asks what does "it" refer to and when the reader stumbles in his/her reading then another formulation would be preferable. I …
answered Jan 31 '14 by rogermue
0
votes
After a preposition follows the object case as in for him, without her etc. as a general rule. Maybe some speakers say "by he who said this" but I don't see a reason why the simple rule should be brok …
answered Dec 23 '14 by rogermue
2
votes
etc. The list of pronouns is limited. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/pronouns1.htm A pronoun replaces a noun: Peter is my brother. You can replace "Peter" by "he". What noun should "student" replace? …
answered Dec 18 '15 by rogermue
1
vote
A direct object that is a noun can be replaced by a pronoun. I like my teacher. I like him. It can even be replaced by indefinite pronouns such as something, nothing, everything etc. I …
answered Jan 28 '15 by rogermue
0
votes
No, it isn't right. The past tense of to be is : I was, you were, he/she/it was - we were, you were, they were See the conjugation of to be: http://www.verbix.com/webverbix/English/be.html
answered Dec 26 '15 by rogermue
0
votes
Probably the situations of such statements are different. A learner who beginns to learn English nouns may point at a table and ask What is it? -- Teacher: It's a table. A waiter may say to a colle …
answered Jul 12 '15 by rogermue
0
votes
Mother to daughter: Every time (when) I go into the bath it's filthy. Liz Phair, song: Every time I see your face I get all wet between my legs. I would say "every time when" is a three-part conjunct …
answered Feb 6 '16 by rogermue
0
votes
The Lord's Prayer in Old English with translation into an archaic English [1] Fæder ūre þū þe eart on heofonum, Father of ours, thou who art in heavens, [2] Sī þīn nama ġehālgod. Be thy name …
answered Jun 22 '15 by rogermue