Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 41995

for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.

7
votes
Internship is perfectly understood in British English and its use would not lead to any confusion. Whilst the term work experience is also used as Phylyp suggests there would be no misunderstanding in …
answered Mar 19 '17 by Sarriesfan
3
votes
If you look at the definition in the Oxford English Dictionary, Slap , and look in the adverb section you can see definition 1.1. 1.1 Exactly; right: Princess Diana was correct in her suspicions …
answered Jan 27 '17 by Sarriesfan
1
vote
As Chris H says in his comment to another answer in the context of the clip provided the person is addressed in the clip as "Ma'am" short for "Madam". This is common practice in British English when …
answered Oct 18 '18 by Sarriesfan
6
votes
From the perspective of a British English speaker I would not use 'cousin brother' but as Alexander mentions in his comment 'male cousin' is used on occasion, where clarity is needed. But most of the …
answered May 19 '17 by Sarriesfan