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This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about what a word means. If the question is about the meaning of a word that can't be understood outside its phrase or sentence, the "meaning-in-context" tag should be also used; for the meaning of a phrase, use the "phrase-meaning" tag instead.

2
votes
There is a difference in usage. A spring is the upwelling of water from underground, with a visible flow. A source is the commencement of a river or stream, it may be a lake or pond with no percept …
answered Aug 13 '15 by Chenmunka
4
votes
There are certain things that are associated in people's minds with certain events or times of year. For the English (as opposed to the Scots), bagpipes are not often heard at times other than aro …
answered Jan 3 '15 by Chenmunka
1
vote
Yes, it means the books are stacked in three layers. The expression "three deep" (four deep etc.) also carries the sense of irregularity. The books are not precisely arranged in three layers. To ta …
answered May 27 '14 by Chenmunka
0
votes
There is a trend to replace have with of in sentences. This is what appears to have happened here. This has come about from spoken speech where expressions like Should have become elided to Should'v …
answered Feb 11 '14 by Chenmunka
3
votes
"of old" is an expression referring to the past, in particular to beyond living memory. It is used more often in literary or poetic works than in spoken English. The expression should just be taken …
answered Nov 14 '14 by Chenmunka
3
votes
This form is used when the writer intends to emphasise some aspect of the country that existed at the time of birth. In this case the presence of a Mathematical School. This is to set the scene in …
answered Mar 19 '14 by Chenmunka
3
votes
This is an expression that describes the lips slowly moving into a smile. Usually used in a literary context to indicate that some realisation or understanding is dawning upon the protagonist.
answered Feb 7 '14 by Chenmunka
2
votes
Base state is a term used in statistics. We have a measurable quantity, in this case the temperature of the sea. We have an effect upon that quantity, El Nino increases the temperature and therefore …
answered Dec 10 '15 by Chenmunka
1
vote
Which part do you not understand? I see three elements that may cause confusion. Save for is used as a synonym for Except for. An addendum in this case is an extra comment at the end of the original …
answered Aug 16 '14 by Chenmunka
1
vote
Your second sentence is just an alternative way of phrasing the sentence. It could equally be written as either of: As far as spelling is concerned, he’s never been a strong student. He’s never …
answered Feb 23 '16 by Chenmunka
4
votes
It is an idiom that simply means one year later. In the sentence you give, it is not clear what is the start of the year's duration. However, time has run on one year - hence one year on.
answered May 12 '15 by Chenmunka
19
votes
To think much of someone is to think highly of them. To give them high regard or respect. It is very often seen in the negative. I don't think much of him is used to refer to someone you dislike or …
answered Jun 13 '14 by Chenmunka
2
votes
It depends upon the object of your delight, although this is not a hard and fast rule. You can be: Delighted with your new purchase Delighted for the success of your team Delighted about the weather …
answered May 27 '15 by Chenmunka
3
votes
Many years ago there was a comedian on British television by the name of Benny Hill. His shows were popular in other countries too. One of the characters that he regularly played would mangle langua …
answered Jan 19 '15 by Chenmunka
6
votes
Yes, it is a joke. There is an expression Starve a fever and feed a cold. This comes from an old wives tale about treatment of illness. Sleeping a concussion is a play on the saying.
answered May 11 '14 by Chenmunka