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For questions about "The", the only definite article used in English.

1
vote
"To have wind" is to be flatulent so I'm afraid I parse "Gone with wind" as "Went while farting".
answered Apr 3 '14 by David Richerby
5
votes
It's exactly the same as "the five lamps" except that there weren't just five – there were many.
answered Nov 14 '18 by David Richerby
0
votes
"A kimono is a traditional Japanese garment" could be read as "There is some particular kimono that is a traditional Japanese garment", by analogy with "A person is outside the door." The statement " …
answered Sep 15 '14 by David Richerby
37
votes
Both are fine and seem to be widely used. To me, "don't have the time" implies a long-term situation, whereas "don't have time" could be more temporary. For example, "My life is so busy that I don't h …
answered Aug 5 '15 by David Richerby
4
votes
Like most things, it depends on context. As most of the other answers have pointed out, if you are the only owner of the bookstore, you'd normally say "I'm the owner of a bookstore." If you jointly o …
answered Jun 28 by David Richerby
10
votes
"Come to market" is an idiomatic phrase meaning "go on sale to the general public". It doesn't mean that the phones have come to markets, i.e., been moved into position in shops, markets and other pla …
answered May 17 '18 by David Richerby