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This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about what a word means. If the question is about the meaning of a word that can't be understood outside its phrase or sentence, the "meaning-in-context" tag should be also used; for the meaning of a phrase, use the "phrase-meaning" tag instead.

15
votes
You're not looking for the meaning of "be very much"; you need the meaning of "be very much for", which is an idiom. To be for something is to be in favor of it, to be an advocate of it, to be a …
answered Oct 13 '14 by Codeswitcher
3
votes
The word intuition refers to two closely related but different things: a mental process and an example product of that mental process. It is easier to define the product, and then use that to define …
answered Jul 3 '15 by Codeswitcher
2
votes
Bolt on is an idiom in British English, but not in American English. (Not sure about its use in other Commonwealth countries.) The Cambridge Dictionaries Online defines it: added to a main produ …
answered Feb 5 '15 by Codeswitcher
0
votes
HA! No, we don't have one of those in English. And let me tell you: my work life would be substantially easier if we did. Because I have to avoid such ambiguities in my professional writing, it's f …
answered May 8 '14 by Codeswitcher
2
votes
The idiom "so bad" should be taken to mean "very intensely and urgently", and generally applies to wanting, desiring, or needing. As in "I have to go to the bathroom so bad."
answered May 2 '14 by Codeswitcher
0
votes
Actually, "to date" only means "to this day" to the extent that "to this day" means "to the present day" or "until and including now", i.e. up to and including that which is returned by /bin/date. Th …
answered Sep 7 '14 by Codeswitcher
2
votes
Does it mean the flakes are removed from the flint edge by breaking, or separating, or dividing(They should be flying/spraying/sprinkling away from the flint in my word)? Yes!
answered May 22 '14 by Codeswitcher
3
votes
scenario. One can think of it as meaning "one possible configuration of events or circumstances, out of many". We use the word "case" in the construction "in this/that/the/its/his/her/their case" to refer …
answered May 8 '14 by Codeswitcher
3
votes
"Ringing" means "making rings around" or "making a ring around". So "The Ukrainian checkpoints [...] ringing key cities do appear vulnerable [....]" is "The Ukrainian checkpoints making rings around …
answered May 15 '14 by Codeswitcher
1
vote
No, "re-meet" is not idiomatic English. If the intended meaning of "meet" is not "encounter for the first time", but the equally common "have a meeting with", and you are trying to express the idea …
answered Dec 24 '17 by Codeswitcher
2
votes
"Looking to improve vs staying where you are, respectively" is a pretty good stab at it. "Laid back" is an idiom that means someone is unconcerned and unanxious, characterized by a notable lack of ur …
answered Feb 5 '15 by Codeswitcher
6
votes
This is an interesting question because I think it's going to hit a bias in ELL.SE user demographics. The expression to blow the whistle means to expose corruption, that is, conspiracy or extortion b …
answered May 31 '14 by Codeswitcher
0
votes
"Impossibly complex" means "so complex as to be impossible to understand". The author is arguing that a certain line of thinking (the "Macedonian discourse of pathology") was as logically inconsisten …
answered May 14 '14 by Codeswitcher
4
votes
This is actually interesting because the usage you quote is slightly surprising. The verb "rock" has two versions, the transitive and the intransitive. The intransitive is more common: something tha …
answered Jul 25 '14 by Codeswitcher
3
votes
While the term "WASP" literally comes from the acronym "White Anglo-Saxon Protestant", it has come to connote not that literal demographic but a rather privileged and insular class/caste of American s …
answered Aug 30 '14 by Codeswitcher

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