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Results tagged with Search options user 5890

This tag is used for questions about the proper construction of sentences.

1
vote
Yes, it's correct. It's barely intelligible, but technically correct. It illustrates nicely there is such a thing as being too concise.
answered Aug 10 '15 by Codeswitcher
4
votes
Important point 1: If one says, "I will come prepared," who is the object of "prepared"? "I" am "prepared". If one says, "I will come armed," who is the object of "armed"? "I" am "armed". Thus if …
answered May 18 '14 by Codeswitcher
3
votes
You're looking for any of: "This had been checked and then sent to you." or "This had been checked before it was sent to you." or "This had been checked before [I, s/he, they, Sally] sent it to y …
answered Apr 29 '14 by Codeswitcher
1
vote
"highly scalable solutions to complex problems" - is this correct? It's perfect. In the second part [...] 500,000 lines of code were produced with database around 1TB size and tabl …
answered Jun 6 '16 by Codeswitcher
2
votes
You're both right. First of all, the sentence "Working earns one more freedom." is perfectly fine. Nothing about it is unusual or in bad style. Second, your friend has a point that bears keeping in …
answered Jun 16 '16 by Codeswitcher
0
votes
Your proposed improvement is technically grammatically sound, but poor style. The problem is that "found" in English means many things. For instance, "he found her hand" can mean "he grasped her han …
answered Apr 21 '16 by Codeswitcher
4
votes
No, it is not. You are correct in noticing that it's a sentence fragment. English speakers often -- when in any but the most formal register -- use sentence fragments. For effect. Not technically …
answered May 16 '14 by Codeswitcher
1
vote
I believe that the way the semicolon is used in the quoted passage is actually technically wrong, and that is some of the source of the difficulty. I had to make two goes at it to parse it, myself. …
answered Feb 19 '16 by Codeswitcher
0
votes
Yes, that's a perfectly fine sentence.
answered Aug 11 '17 by Codeswitcher
3
votes
@Chenmunka's close, but actually, I think you mean: Don't overlook the esteem of the person who values you the most. Both @Chenmunka's sentence (with "worth of the person") and @helix's correcti …
answered Apr 25 '14 by Codeswitcher
7
votes
Of the two hypotheticals you offer, only one of the 12 dead astronauts would have been technically correct, but sounded like a reproach, as if the narrator/author was criticizing her for being c …
answered May 9 '14 by Codeswitcher
1
vote
Those your examples are both perfectly good English, but they mean something slightly different than what you describe wanting to express. The expression "act in a way" suggests not actually doing dif …
answered Jan 6 '17 by Codeswitcher