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Results tagged with Search options user 6407

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about what a word means. If the question is about the meaning of a word that can't be understood outside its phrase or sentence, the "meaning-in-context" tag should be also used; for the meaning of a phrase, use the "phrase-meaning" tag instead.

3
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Bumper 1, 2 here means unusually large and successful, and is often used this way in the context of production yields. You can see from the context that Russia's oil production is much larger than us …
answered Dec 7 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
1
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). It might also be that the FBI was following the refugees for some reason, meaning they were literally behind us [the refugees]. Behind may also be used in a temporal sense, meaning that the FBI started …
answered Jun 3 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
1
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Rump here means the small, unimportant remnants or left overs from something larger. MW def. 3, Oxford def. 2. Rump rebel organizations is a compound noun phrase, lumping all the words together to for …
answered Jul 17 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
3
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It's saying "your experience of being a fan will be enhanced or improved if you have friends with you (while you are being a fan)". X is Y with Z means that adding Z to X will make X become Y.
answered Jul 19 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
2
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Your change to the phrasing is grammatical, but substantially changes the meaning. Using who nonetheless have creates a contrast: they have easy, loving relationships in spite of their beauty … archaic in that context. Even if we grant the secondary meaning of enjoy in this case, the phrasing doesn't carry the strong connotation of triumph in the face of adversity that the nonetheless construction does. …
answered Mar 1 '16 by Esoteric Screen Name
5
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As stated in the definition, it means to be in a specified circumstance; in this case, he is in the circumstance of probably losing ten dollars. The use of stand here means that the loss of money has …
answered Jun 3 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
17
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far as meaning having a profound connection to some 'essence of pie'. This is a twist on the common sports advice / trope be the ball. You'll get a great (and hilarious) explanation if you watch this clip from the classic movie Caddyshack. …
answered May 27 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
2
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ad, one is generally assumed not to be searching for someone who would be a poor match, as the phrasing might suggest. This is a very idiomatic construction with subtle, nuanced meaning which I find …
answered May 23 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
2
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Own is often used as an emphasiser to enhance or draw attention to the closeness or possessional aspect of the relationship. Some examples: I'll be staying in my own home tonight. Draws attention t …
answered Feb 8 '15 by Esoteric Screen Name
2
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appear in colloquial speech. Beyond X's Y is an idiom meaning outside, past, or greater than the scope of Y, as Y relates to X. Examples: Beyond one's ken - outside of one's knowledge and experience … understood to mean everyone or the topic in general In this specific case, fixing is a gerund, and as such, an appropriate target for the preposition beyond. Because this is an idiom, it's understood that its meaning here is ability to repair, and not literal act of repairing. …
answered Nov 10 '16 by Esoteric Screen Name
4
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An expansion: Jo Counsell ... concedes that such [highly ambitious] parents exist. "But because we are a support organisation, [such parents] don't tend to approach us. Most of our parents [i.e., …
answered Jun 16 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
7
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example: it's, how's, he's, she's, that's, etc. In standard English, s' is never a contraction*. The double meaning of 's leads to one of the most common mistakes in written English: confusing its …
answered Jul 28 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
3
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used to work in an office. I didn't like that. Both of these statements are grammatically valid. The difference between hated and didn't like is one of meaning, not grammar. Hate is a much …
answered Mar 1 '16 by Esoteric Screen Name