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Results tagged with Search options user 6407

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the several possibilities available for a particular meaning, and which one of them would be the most appropriate.

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'All Yours' Vs. 'All is Yours' Vs. 'Everything is Yours' All yours is by far the most standard of the three, especially with the hand gesture you've mentioned. It also does hold up internationall …
answered Jul 22 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
1
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In this context, well is indeed an adjective, and it means not ill or healthy. It is much more commonly used in British English than American English, though it is valid and correct in both dialects. …
answered May 20 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
3
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In mathematics, probability is expressed on an interval from zero to one, inclusive. A zero probability means the event will never be realized; one means that it's assured. Positive means strictly gr …
answered Aug 15 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
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For the first request, since you've said hit (which makes me think that some force is being used), I'd say thump, thud, thunk or clunk, with the first two being preferred (unless the stick is extremel …
answered Jul 28 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
1
vote
Both are grammatically and semantically correct choices. Here, I would use rivals over competitors because compete with ... competitors sounds awkwardly redundant. You might also consider competing w …
answered May 22 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
3
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In and of itself, there's nothing wrong with don't I? as a question tag. Alternatives: When have I not? What do you mean? As fluffy notes, you specify an argumentative context so these responses d …
answered Aug 1 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
3
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You're reading too much into the context around the words. While we may often speak of preparing for the worst, the words aren't inherently about negative consequences and situations. The word pre …
answered Dec 14 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
1
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Yes, they have different meanings. In the context of Fifty Shades, I don't do romance means the character is wholly uninterested in the usual trappings of attracting a mate: wining and dining, emotion …
answered Dec 4 '15 by Esoteric Screen Name
3
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No, anybody does not mean the same as any body or any corpse (but the latter two are roughly equivalent in this context). As noted by FumbleFingers in the comments, this is a mistake on Word's part, b …
answered Jun 10 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
3
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Both are acceptable phrasings and carry essentially the same gross semantic meaning to a native speaker. Namely, that the listener will receive a chance to be part of an interview. This is the importa …
answered May 21 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
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The difference is in the metaphor within the idiom. Different metaphors create different contexts which create different usages. End to end conveys a linear sense; a line or length of some sort, and …
answered Jul 15 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
7
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Mistress is precisely the word you're looking for and not archaic or obsolete. US English dictionaries: MW (4a), Wikipedia, TFD (1); British English dictionaries: Collins (1), Cambridge (2), Oxford (2 …
answered Feb 5 '15 by Esoteric Screen Name
3
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All four are correct for your situation; they just have slightly different meanings. You can also use very with any of the four choices. Think about it: all four are adjectives, so if using one is gra …
answered Feb 8 '15 by Esoteric Screen Name
5
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I'll be referring to the definitions of count from Oxford Learner's in my answer. Don't count is the closest to an opposite for count in the sense of numbering in sequence (definition 1). There's no …
answered Jul 9 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name
2
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The correct sentence is: I think my card was stolen by my friend. Here, you use the past of is because the action of stealing has completed. The card is gone; it is not currently becoming stolen …
answered May 15 '14 by Esoteric Screen Name

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