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This tag is for questions about the difference in meaning between certain phrases or sentences.

1
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These sentences mean the same thing. Saying "he is no doctor" conveys a little more emphasis on the negation, as if the person has hinted that they are doctor and already given advice and you are emp …
answered Sep 27 '18 by farnsy
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Using "the" in this context is restricting our attention to a certain set of buildings, etc. In this context, it's probably clear which buildings are referred to. Let's say somewhere previously, he …
answered Dec 6 '17 by farnsy
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Any one of them could be correct and their meaning is very similar. I attend a speakers' club Here the club belongs or pertains to numerous speakers. My feeling is that this is the most common …
answered Dec 20 '17 by farnsy
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Very little difference. "Appears" is a very slightly more formal word than "seems." It might be more likely to be used in a professional context, such as in a coroner's report. In addition, "seems …
answered Oct 8 '18 by farnsy
2
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I will just focus on one set of examples: I want to eat apples and oranges. This is the most natural and common way to say this. You want to eat apples and oranges but are not particular about …
answered Dec 24 '17 by farnsy
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Prisons are the best options for serial killers Wrong in most cases. Unless you are talking about a specific set of prisons that you, or someone, gets to choose from, prisons are not separate opt …
answered Nov 4 '18 by farnsy
2
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By and large is not really a synonym for the other two. It means "generally speaking" or "for the most part." It implies that whatever is about to be said is mostly true over a large number of cases …
answered Sep 6 by farnsy