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A preposition is a word governing, and usually preceding, a noun or pronoun and expressing a relation to another word or element in the clause.

1
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Whether or not these prepositions work in these contexts has much to do with the root meanings of the verbs "infect" and "graduate" and how prepositions are typically used with them. Either way, in … because you might talk about "the graduation rate of immigrants in a subject area from a college. All of those prepositions are tied to "graduate" in specific ways. Infections can happen in people or among …
answered Dec 7 '17 by joiedevivre
23
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I suppose the dictionary definition of "exactly" that the other answer mentioned sort of works, but in this context, as a native speaker, I'd interpret "right" to mean "near." So if someone told me to …
answered May 23 '18 by joiedevivre
5
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sentence is usually much more important for choosing the best preposition. English is pretty lax about prepositions compared to some other languages, so none of the proposed prepositions is necessarily … incorrect. However, I would say that the best prepositions to use with the verb "contact" are usually "by" (a method), "on" (a platform), "in" (a location), or "at" (other types of locations). Here …
answered Dec 4 '17 by joiedevivre
0
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There's no real "why" in all of this. It's just how English is. And sometimes it can go either way. I can say "I punched him in the arm" or "I punched his arm." Other expressions are less lenient. Ho …
answered Feb 13 '18 by joiedevivre
0
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I can only hear the first sentence as a type of redundancy used for emphasis, and in fact I would be likely to punctuate it as follows: This bed has not been slept in for a long time—by anybody. How …
answered Jun 7 '18 by joiedevivre
1
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I can't find any supporting documentation, but as a native speaker, I would say they are not exactly interchangeable. I don't think anyone would say, "People have hope of change." It would also be odd …
answered Feb 9 '18 by joiedevivre