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Results tagged with Search options user 73264

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

1
vote
Generally, a cabinet will refer to a single integrated piece of furniture, often with multiple drawers or compartments. As an example, for kitchens, we have upper and lower cabinets where the uppers a …
answered Jul 11 by pboss3010
0
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If you are looking for a word that means "has not been encountered before", the best word would be "unfamiliar". This would fit with your second example: "The problem was unfamiliar" would mean "I hav …
answered Aug 31 '18 by pboss3010
0
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Really, the standard way in the US is to simply say "I need to get gas". The context of filling the car's gas tank is just assumed. If you're in New Jersey or some place that still has full service yo …
answered Jun 21 by pboss3010
1
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So, normally "to bridge" has the implication of building a literal bridge, or a metaphorical one over some kind of viewpoint chasm. In your examples, it would make more sense to use "connect" or "pair …
answered Sep 10 '18 by pboss3010
2
votes
"Down to me/you" isn't uncommon in US English. However, the phrase normally only gets used as part of an elimination process. For example, a teacher searching students for notes being passed around mi …
answered Mar 13 by pboss3010
1
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In the US, you would actually say something like "we had a normal amount of rain this year" or "we had an average rainfall this year". This is, of course, compared to the historical rain totals for a …
answered Apr 23 by pboss3010
1
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They aren't the same. "Feasible" means "you are able to do it". "Practicable" means "it makes sense to do it". For example, "we'll build a bridge across the Atlantic as soon as it's feasible" would m …
answered May 21 by pboss3010