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This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the meaning or correctness of a word in a sentence. Give as much context as possible.

1
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1answer
In http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-pacific-15263826 there is the phrase "ethnic Russian". Will you please tell me what does it mean? (I know what the word "ethnic" means)
asked Aug 1 '14 by Megadeth
0
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1answer
I wonder if "defer" can be used in such a way: "We defer this discussion to the last section (of this paper)", for example. My hesitation came from that search results did not give similar usage.
asked Jan 3 '19 by Megadeth
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In math context, "exactly one" is a better, more precise quantifier. It is common in math to see that "there is exactly one" or "there is precisely one" means "there is one and only one", which means …
answered Jun 6 '17 by Megadeth
0
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1answer
I came across the word "punchline", so I looked up its meaning in the dictionary http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/punchline. Nevertheless, there seems no such word in current usage. Thus, I b …
asked Sep 13 '14 by Megadeth
2
votes
2answers
The main question is if using "unsolicited" implies a negative connotation? My original intention is simply to express "spontaneous" in the situation. Why not "spontaneous"? Perhaps it gives a feeling …
asked Dec 31 '18 by Megadeth
1
vote
1answer
Is the use of the phrase set agoing legitimate? By legitimate I mean that if an author uses this phrase then her\his readers catch its meaning. Incidentally, I have not found any evidence rejecting …
asked Jul 4 '14 by Megadeth
3
votes
1answer
I am after a word that is not too unknown and that can convey the meaning of "desiredly? Here "desiredly" is only used to make a point; I did some search and am under the impression that there is no s …
asked May 5 '18 by Megadeth
0
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2answers
So I wonder if there is any chance for such a use of the term "delusional" to make sense (even for exaggeration): We will show that such-and-so concept can be delusional. If not, would "illusional" be …
asked Feb 15 '19 by Megadeth
2
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2answers
Suppose we have a proposition of any given form (for example, "the earth is 'flat' "). In terms of observations, the best we can do is to decide if the proposition is disproved or not disproved (which …
asked Jul 8 '19 by Megadeth
0
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1answer
I would like to find a term, if it exists, to describe an individual who kids himself. Specifically, the term is to describe someone who does something that is obviously self-deceiving in some sense.
asked Dec 9 '18 by Megadeth
1
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2answers
I would like to find a verb such that " 'the verb' you this much" is the opposite of "cost you this much". My intuition is that "give" would be such a choice, but I would like to see if there is a bet …
asked Aug 25 '18 by Megadeth
0
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2answers
I wonder if there is single word in English that is the version of "anachronism" with "time" replaced with "occasion". I recall that I saw such a word somewhere; but I am not really sure. To supplem …
asked Nov 20 '18 by Megadeth
2
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2answers
Amoral in its dogmatic usage refers to irrelevant to morality, see, say http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/amoral. But I am wondering: 1) In current usage, is this word also used to mean …
asked Jul 16 '14 by Megadeth
1
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Well, I would say some author would like to use "there exist" as a direct translation of the existential quantifier. In this case, like in your case, the author does not bother to fit his writing in a …
answered Jan 16 '15 by Megadeth
0
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3answers
Out of curiosity, is there a verb, which need not be popular, such that it says "suffice" and "require" simultaneously? I am after a verb that is equivalent to "if and only if". The major context tha …
asked Jul 10 '18 by Megadeth

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