We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 86847

This tag is used for questions about the proper construction of sentences.

1
vote
Use the simple and continuous past tenses Sorry! I didn't see your message yesterday morning until later that day. I wasn't avoiding replying. Reason: your not seeing the message happened, once …
answered Jan 5 by rpeinhardt
0
votes
(3) I want to change my job. (4) I want to change my career. These don't quite mean what you intend. They mean "I would like to change (something about) my current job/career (but stay in th …
answered Dec 21 '18 by rpeinhardt
0
votes
We must define what is a dice game. This would be understood as: Of all the games that exist, there are some that can be categorized as being a "dice game." We must establish a rule that distingu …
answered Dec 26 '18 by rpeinhardt
1
vote
Either sentence will work Both sentences express the same meaning equally well. Sentence #1 uses a prepositional phrase while sentence #2 uses a gerund. I was excited This is in the past tense. …
answered Jan 8 by rpeinhardt
2
votes
You would never say "Insisted to" The correct grammar is "She insisted on posting this one." This means that she insisted that she post this one. If you intend to convey that she insisted that you …
answered Dec 28 '18 by rpeinhardt
1
vote
"That" is not correct in the original sentence "That" should be "than." Perhaps you misheard or there was a sound quality problem that caused the audio to be distorted and sound like "that" instead o …
answered Jan 25 by rpeinhardt
1
vote
There is no difference in meaning, the choice is a matter of style This question was discussed on the English Language and Usage Exchange and has some good answers if you're curious to read more on t …
answered Apr 16 by rpeinhardt
3
votes
"Making a total of" is acceptable, but a little verbose. Your other option uses a similar looking verb that has an incorrect meaning. Totalize means⁰ "to comprehend in a way that includes everything …
answered Jan 31 by rpeinhardt
1
vote
You might try: Method A is limited by its loss of flexibility in a high dimension but Method B overcomes this limitation. Method B is not limited by a loss of flexibility in a high dimension …
answered Jan 9 by rpeinhardt
2
votes
I think the last one is technically correct but it would never be used (at least not in the USA). I'm not sure it would even be used in British English, either (the dictionary says that usedn't and u …
answered Oct 10 by rpeinhardt